Psychology Textbooks and Full Courses

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Psychology Textbooks and Full Courses Collection Resources (68)

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Abnormal Behavior
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This course will help to define abnormal and normal behaviors and to group these abnormal phenomena into 'disorders.' It will cover the basic concepts surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of abnormal psychological phenomena. The student will investigate the characteristics, epidemiology, controversy, and treatment of individual disorders. The student will begin by defining normal versus abnormal behavior and reviewing the historical context in which abnormal psychology emerged, then discuss the major theories or paradigms associated with abnormal psychology, the classification system used to differentiate and define disorders, and the research methods often utilized in the study of abnormal psychology. Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: describe the historical context from which the current conceptualization of abnormal psychology has evolved; identify and describe the main theoretical perspectives/paradigms which have influenced the field of abnormal psychology; identify and differentiate the classification of psychological disorders; evaluate treatment approaches; explain the major research findings for each group of disorders and how they add to our knowledge of the causes and treatment of psychological disorders. (Psychology 401)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Abnormal Psychology: An e-text!
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This wiki is an ongoing collaboration between Dr. Caleb Lack and students at the University of Central Oklahoma and Arkansas Tech University. So far, over 300 students have spent eight semesters and thousands of hours in contributing to this wiki. The purpose of this wiki is to offer an alternative to the often quite expensive textbooks used in most undergraduate abnormal psychology courses by creating a user-driven, interactive online text. The wiki covers a larger number of topics than traditional texts, allowing professors and students to focus on their own interests.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikispaces
Author:
Caleb Lack
Date Added:
07/06/2016
Abnormal Psychology Course LibGuide
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This LibGuide was designed to accompany a community college course in Abnormal Psychology. It contains original material created by the instructor (Mind Maps and Focus Questions), as well as supporting readings gathered from other open sources and some links to freely available copyrighted material. Institutions with a subscription to the LibGuides platform may want to make a copy so they can adapt it to local needs and control the content.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Reading
Provider:
Northwestern Michigan College
Date Added:
10/10/2016
Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Feelings, Spring 2013
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This course studies the relations of affect to cognition and behavior, feeling to thinking and acting, and values to beliefs and practices. These connections will be considered at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.

Subject:
Biology
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Chorover, Stephan
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Animal Behavior, Fall 2013
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Most of the major categories of adaptive behavior can be seen in all animals. This course begins with the evolution of behavior, the driver of nervous system evolution, reviewed using concepts developed in ethology, sociobiology, other comparative studies, and in studies of brain evolution. The roles of various types of plasticity are considered, as well as foraging and feeding, defensive and aggressive behavior, courtship and reproduction, migration and navigation, social activities and communication, with contributions of inherited patterns and cognitive abilities. Both field and laboratory based studies are reviewed; and finally, human behavior is considered within the context of primate studies.

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Schneider, Gerald
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Autism Theory and Technology, Spring 2011
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This course illuminates current theories about autism together with challenges faced by people on the autism spectrum. Theories in communicating, interacting socially, managing cognitive and affective overload, and achieving independent lifestyles are covered. In parallel, the course presents state-of-the-art technologies being developed for helping improve both theoretical understanding and practical outcomes. Participants are expected to meet and interact with people on the autism spectrum. Weekly reading, discussion, and a term project are required.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Matthew Goodwin
Rosalind W. Picard
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Clinical Psychology
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This course will cover the basic concepts of clinical psychology -- the study of diagnosing, treating, and understanding abnormal and maladaptive behaviors. Much of the information in this course is based on the Diagnostic Statistical Manual IV-TR (DSM), which is the industry standard for both clinical psychologists and psychiatrists. Few issues in the field have hard-and-fast answers. As such, rather than providing you with step-by-step directions, this course has been designed to assist you in making educated decisions when diagnosing and treating a mental disease. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Describe the historical context of the emergence of clinical psychology; Demonstrate an awareness of the differences between mental health professionals in the broad field of clinical psychology; Identify the subspecialty areas within clinical psychology (i.e., community psychology, health psychology, and neuropsychology); Define the main tasks of the clinical psychologist and explain how the contributions of this subspecialty fit into or relate to the broader field of psychology; Define the criteria for what is considered 'abnormal' versus 'normal' and explain how these definitions fit into the notion that psychopathology exists on a continuum; Compare/contrast the different types of psychotherapy treatments; Discuss the ethical considerations related to the practice of psychotherapy; List the main diagnostic features of a variety of mental disorders (i.e., mood disorders, schizophrenia, etc.); Identify the potential factors that may contribute to the instigation and persistence of mental illness for individuals across the lifespan (i.e., children, adults, and older adults). (Psychology 205)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Cognitive Psychology
Conditions of Use:
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This course will introduce you to cognitive psychology. Memory, along with attention, perception, language, and decision making, are among the most prominent topics within this broad and diverse field. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify underlying theoretical considerations in the field of cognitive psychology; Describe the historical context in which cognitive psychology emerged as a field; Define cognitive psychology as is was historically defined and is now defined; Identify the main academic fields and other subdisciplines of psychology to which cognitive psychology is tied; Describe the main findings in the primary areas of scientific research within cognitive psychology; Compare and contrast the theories associated within the primary areas of scientific research in cognitive psychology (e.g., models of memory, attention, etc.). (Psychology 206)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Cognitive Psychology
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Cognitive Psychology is a psychological science which is interested in various mind and brain related subfields such as cognition, the mental processes that underlie behavior, reasoning and decision making.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
05/13/2016
Collaborative Consultation and Larger Systems, Fall 2007
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How do individuals and families interface with larger systems, and how do therapists intervene collaboratively? How do larger systems structure the lives of individuals and families? Relationally-trained practitioners are attempting to answer these questions through collaborative and interdisciplinary, team-focused projects in mental health, education, the law, and business, among other fields. Similarly, scholars and researchers are developing specific culturally responsive models: outreach family therapy, collaborative health care, multi-systemic school interventions, social-justice-oriented and spiritual approaches, organizational coaching, and consulting, among others. This course explores these developments and aims at developing a clinical and consulting knowledge that contributes to families, organizations, and communities within a collaborative and social-justice-oriented vision.

Subject:
Management
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ed.D
Gonzalo Bacigalupe
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Consciousness Studies
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Everyone has their own view of the nature of consciousness based on their education and background. The intention of this book is to expand this view by providing an insight into the various ideas and beliefs on the subject as well as a review of current work in neuroscience. The neuroscientist should find the philosophical discussion interesting because this provides first-person insights into the nature of consciousness and also provides some subtle arguments about why consciousness is not a simple problem. The student of philosophy will find a useful introduction to the subject and information about neuroscience and physics that is difficult to acquire elsewhere.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
07/27/2016
Cultural Psychology
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Cultural Psychology reviews the cultural, community, and ecological factors that play a role in how people perceive their environment. The goal of this course is to investigate the ways in which culture can affect aspects of that individual's psychology. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify current trends in contemporary cultural psychology and compare and contrast these concepts with historical and empirical psychological theory; compare and contrast variations in cognitive processes and expectations amongst cultures; describe the difference between measuring and quantifying intelligence within different cultural groups, including culturally normed assessment tools; explain the study of intercultural relations and communication; demonstrate an awareness of theories of cultural differences in affective expression, including both culture-specific and universal concepts; list factors of motivation and cultural implications; identify the stages of human development, including racial and ethnicity-specific developmental theories with a focus on comparing and contrasting individualistic and collectivistic themes; list the criteria for various psychological disorders, including cultural adaptations and culture-bound syndromes. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Psychology 403)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
Discover Psychology 2.0 - A Brief Introductory Text
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This textbook presents core concepts common to introductory courses. The 15 units cover the traditional areas of intro-to-psychology; ranging from biological aspects of psychology to psychological disorders to social psychology. This book can be modified: feel free to add or remove modules to better suit your specific needs.

This book includes a comprehensive instructor's manual, PowerPoint presentations, a test bank, reading anticipation guides, and adaptive student quizzes.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Cara Laney
David M. Buss
David Watson
Edward Diener
Elizabeth F. Loftus
Emily Hooker
George Loewenstein
Henry L. Roediger III
Jeanne Tsai
Kathleen B. McDermott
Mark E. Bouton
Max H. Bazerman
Richard E. Lucas
Robert Siegler
Robert V. Levine
Ross Thompson
Sarah Pressman
Sudeep Bhatia
Susan T. Fiske
Yoshihisa Kashima
Date Added:
12/08/2016
Educational Psychology
Conditions of Use:
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Educational psychologists work to understand how to structure educational systems in order to meet the mental and emotional needs of students. They study how people learn, identify and suggest efficient teaching methods, and evaluate the effectiveness of various educational policies and practices. Educational psychologists often point out the inherently social nature of our current educational system, study the ways that learning environments affect education, and study the ways that societal, local, and family issues affect learning and classroom practice. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain why knowledge of psychology is important to effective teaching; discuss, compare, and contrast cognitive and behavioral psychology; discuss, compare, and contrast constructivist and behaviorist models of teaching and learning, as well as their applications in classroom management; identify important cognitive stages of development, the typical age range of each stage, and the ways that teachers can use that knowledge; identify important aspects of personal, emotional, and moral development, and ways that teachers can use that knowledge; identify diversity in terms of differences in learning styles, intelligence, cultures, and gender, as well as specific abilities and disabilities, that a modern classroom might need to accommodate; discuss theories of motivation and defend those you would use in your classroom; discuss classroom management strategies that smooth the learning process and prevent or deal with misbehavior, and defend those strategies you would use in your classroom; identify communication skills that enhance learning, management, and coordination with students' families; identify strategies for enhancing students' ability to use complex cognitive skills; identify the major parts of a lesson or unit plan; identify and discuss types of teacher-made assessments; discuss the uses of and issues surrounding standardized testing; identify and discuss factors that influence job satisfaction in a teaching career. (Psychology 303)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Entertainment Education for Behavior Change
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This course examines and teaches ways in which education can be subtly but effectively worked into both new and time-honored genres of entertainment to foster positive behavior change and life improvement in both developing countries and local environments. The course develops students' ability to understand the ingredients of successful entertainment (emotions, empathy, efficacy and empowerment) and how these ingredients can be employed to enhance social and personal health and life skills. Examines methodology and develops skills needed to create a successful Entertainment-Education (E-E) project in entertainment (story, drama, etc.) formats with effective behavior change messages.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Esta de Fossard
Date Added:
09/15/2009
Evolutionary Psychology, Spring 1999
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Current research on the evolution and development of cognition and affect, including intuitive physics, biology, and psychology, language, emotions sexuality, social relations.

Subject:
Biology
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Pinker, Steven
Date Added:
01/01/1999
Feeling and Imagination in Art, Science, and Technology, Spring 2004
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Seminar on the creativity in art, science, and technology. Discussion of how these pursuits are jointly dependent on affective as well as cognitive elements in human nature. Feeling and imagination studied in relation to principles of idealization, consummation, and the aesthetic values that give meaning to science and technology as well as literature and the other arts. Readings in philosophy, psychology, and literature.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Singer Irving
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Gender and Sexuality
Conditions of Use:
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This course will introduce the student to the psychology behind gender and sexuality. In this course, the student will take a look at how our understanding of one's own gender and sex can affect different aspects of our functioning, while also identifying the factors in our lives that can impact oneĺÎĺĺÎĺs gender and sex. This course will begin by introducing and defining the concepts of gender and sexuality, then looking at the similarities and differences between sexes in terms of biological and neurological functioning and development, as well as gender and sexual identity. Also, the student will discuss why and how the sexes are psychologically and cognitively different. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define and explain specific terms that relate to gender and sexuality; define and explain influences that impact homosexual and heterosexual gender identities; define and explain sexual stereotypes; explain the biologically based characteristics, including differences and similarities, between genders; explain the differences between gender identities, including theoretical approaches; explain the sociobiological and psychoanalytic approaches to sexuality and gender identity; define and explain the social learning and cognitive developmental approaches to gender and sexuality; explain the commonalities and differences between the cognitive abilities of genders; explain the commonalities and differences between gender and aggression. (Psychology 406)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Conditions of Use:
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This course will introduce the student to organizational psychology, or the application of psychological research and theory to human interaction in the workplace. Industrial/Organization Psychology takes research findings and theories that were originally used to explain general human behavior and applies them to human behavior in the workplace. The course begins by taking a look at how the student evaluates jobs and employees before exploring how the student evaluates and motivate employees, noting what encourages versus discourages employee job commitment. The student will then study leadership and group influences in the workplace, including working conditions, humans factors, performance management, and work teams. Leadership interaction and the leadership theories are also covered. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: perform a thorough and systematic competency model (job analysis); develop and validate a job specific selection design; design, develop, and evaluate a job specific training program; define a performance appraisal process and form; identify research methods for conducting experiments; explain organizational recruitment, selection, and retainment; evaluate the work performance of employees; describe the motivating factors of employees; identify teamwork problems and issues; compare and contrast models of motivation and leadership; explain organizational issues including: teams, attitudes, and occupational health; define work-life balance and its impact on organizations and employees. (Psychology 304)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011