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100's Day
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What does 100 look like? Sound like? Feel like? In this video from Curious George, explore the many ways to measure 100 things. ***Access to Teacher's Domain content now requires free login to PBS Learning Media. ***Access to Teacher's Domain content now requires free login to PBS Learning Media.

Subject:
Engineering
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Teachers' Domain
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
08/09/2007
20/20 Vision
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In this activity, students determine their own eyesight and calculate what a good average eyesight value for the class would be. Students learn about technologies to enhance eyesight and how engineers play an important role in the development of these technologies.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denali Lander
Janet Yowell
Joe Freidrichsen
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/26/2008
3RC (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Compost)
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In this lesson, students expand their understanding of solid waste management to include the idea of 3RC (reduce, reuse, recycle and compost). They will look at the effects of packaging decisions (reducing) and learn about engineering advancements in packaging materials and solid waste management. Also, they will observe biodegradation in a model landfill (composting).

Subject:
Engineering
Ecology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Amy Kolenbrander
Janet Yowell
Jessica Todd
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
9th Grade Cube Challenge
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Students will use a perceived weak material to construct something that is surprisingly strong.
Students can experiment with different shapes and configurations to see what holds the most weight.
The cube size is defined, what each student places within each 4x4 square, is up to them.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Author:
John Brander
Date Added:
02/28/2019
AC Circuits
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This eBook was written as the sequel to the eBook titled DC Circuits, which was written in 2016 by Chad Davis.
This eBook covers Alternating Current (AC) circuit theory as well us a brief introduction of electronics. It is
broken up into seven modules. Module 1 covers the basic theory of AC signals. Since only DC sources are used in
the first eBook, details of AC signals such as sinusoidal waveforms (or sine waves), square waves, and triangle
waves are provided. Module 2, titled AC Circuits Math Background, covers the mathematics background needed
for solving AC circuit problems. The background material in Modules 1 and 2 are combined in Module 3 to solve
circuits with AC sources that include resistors, inductors, and capacitors (RLC circuits).

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
SHAREOK
Date Added:
01/07/2017
AC / DC: What's the Difference?
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This animated essay from the American Experience Web site explains the difference between alternating and direct electric current and offers in-depth explanations about the role played by a battery, light bulb, wire, and generator. Grades 6-12. ***Access to Teacher's Domain content now requires free login to PBS Learning Media.

Subject:
Engineering
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Teachers' Domain
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
01/22/2004
ACESSE Resource A - Introduction to Formative Assessment to Support Equitable 3D Instruction
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In this professional development session, we will develop a shared understanding of how formative assessment works and different approaches that have been developed. The material for this resource come from a series of PD sessions on formative assessment developed by the ACESSE team: Philip Bell, Shelley Stromholt, Bill Penuel, Katie Van Horne, Tiffany Neill, and Sam Shaw.We will be updating this Facilitator's Guide for ACESSE Resource A with the most up-to-date information about this resource over time. If you encounter problems with this resource, you can contact us at: STEMteachingtools@uw.edu

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Sarah Evans
Date Added:
12/20/2016
ACESSE Resource B - How to Assess Three-Dimensional Learning in Your Classroom
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The NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education and the resulting Next Generation Science Standards focus on an integrated three-dimensional view of science learning in which students develop understanding of core ideas of science and crosscutting concepts in the context of engaging in science and engineering practices.How is assessing three-dimensional science learning different than how we have thought of science learning in the past? How can we design assessment tasks that elicit student’s current understanding of specific aspects of the disciplinary core ideas, science and engineering practices, and crosscutting concepts in order to shape future instruction? In this workshop, participants will learn how to interpret and design cognitive formative assessment to fit a three-dimensional view of learning.This resource originates from a series of PD sessions on 3D formative assessment developed and provided by Katie Van Horne, Shelley Stromholt, Bill Penuel, and Philip Bell. It has been improved through a collaboration in the ACESSE project with science education experts from 13 states. Please cite this resource as follows:Stromholt, S., Van Horne, K., Bell, P., Penuel, W. R., Neill, T. & Shaw, S. (2017). How to Assess Three-Dimensional Learning in Your Classroom: Building Assessment Tasks that Work. [OER Professional Development Session from the ACESSE Project] Retrieved from http://stemteachingtools.org/pd/SessionB

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Sarah Evans
Date Added:
01/06/2017
ACESSE Resource C - Making Science Instruction Compelling for All Students
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How can science instruction be meaningfullyconnected to the out-of-school lives of students? In this professional development, we will consider how to design formative assessments that build on learners’ interest and knowledge, promoting equity and social justice in the process. The material for this resource comes from a series of PD sessions on formative assessment originally developed by Philip Bell and Shelley Stromholt.We will be updating this Facilitator's Guide for ACESSE Resource C with the most up to date information about this resource over time. If you encounter problesm with this resources, you can contact us at STEMteachingtools@uw.eduThis resource was refined through a 13-state collaboration to make the resource more broadly useful. If you choose to adapt these materials, please attribute the source and that it was work funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Sarah Evans
Date Added:
06/02/2017
ACESSE Resource D - How to Craft 3D Classroom Science Assessments
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Abstract: This session provides a step-by-step process to support participants as they design a 3D assessment task for the science classroom. Along the way, they learn how to define 3D learning performances for specific lessons—and how to use a range of tools to support their assessment design work. A key goal of the session activity is to improve the connection of intended learning goals to assessment practices. Participants build their 3D assessment design capacity by designing and workshopping tasks—before piloting them in their classrooms. The approaches learned in this workshop can be used with any curricula, at any grade level, and across all subjects of science. 

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Hank Clark
Date Added:
02/09/2018
ACESSE Resource G - Learning to See the Resources Students Bring to Sense-Making
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Overview: In this workshop, we will build our capacity to identify the range of intellectual resources students use as they make sense of phenomena. We will first explore how equity and justice relate to culture-based approaches to pedagogy—and then focus on how to identify and leverage the resources students use in moments of sensemaking. This resource can also be used by individuals wanting to learn how equity involves promoting the rightful presence of all students across scales of justice, desettling inequities, and supporting expansive learning pathways. This workshop provides participants with an opportunity to explore important theoretical ideas by exploring examples of how learners engage in diverse sense-making. Participants will learn about some of the challenges that less expansive learning environments can cause for learners from non-dominant communities. This resource is estimated to take between 161-268 minutes (2 ⅔ - 4 ¾ hours), depending on the choices of the facilitator in scenario selection.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Hank Clark
AM I on the Radio?
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Student groups create working radios by soldering circuit components supplied from AM radio kits. By carrying out this activity in conjunction with its associated lesson concerning circuits and how AM radios work, students are able to identify each circuit component they are soldering, as well as how their placement causes the radio to work. Besides reinforcing lesson concepts, students also learn how to solder, which is an activity that many engineers perform regularly giving students a chance to be able to engage in a real-life engineering activity.

Subject:
Engineering
Electronic Technology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Brandon Jones
Emily Spataro
Lara Oliver
Lisa Burton
Date Added:
09/18/2014
APSAR: Anonymous Position Based Security Aware Routing Protocol for MANETs
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In the last two decades, research in various aspects of mobile ad-hoc networks, MANETs, has been very active, motivated mainly by military, disaster relief and law enforcement scenarios. More recently, location information has become increasingly available; partially prompted by the emerging trend to incorporate location or position sensing into personal handheld devices. An evolutionary natural step is to adopt such position-based operation in MANETs. This results in what we call position-based MANETs. In such settings, devices are equipped with position-sensing capabilities and rely on position information in their operation. The main distinguishing feature of the envisaged position-based MANET environment is the communication paradigm based not on permanent or semi-permanent identities, addresses or pseudonyms, but on instantaneous node locations or positions. In some application settings, such as: military, law enforcement and search-and-rescue, node identities are not nearly as important as node positions. Such settings have certain characteristics in common. First, node position is very important: knowledge of the physical, as opposed to logical or relative topology, makes it possible to avoid wasteful communication and focus on nodes located within a specific area. Thus, the emphasis is not on the longterm node identity, but rather on current node position. Second, critical environments face security and privacy attacks. Security attacks aim to distribute false location and network ing control information, e.g., routing control messages, or impede the propagation of genuine information. The goal of privacy attacks is to track nodes as they move. Third, when the operating environment is hostile, as is the case in military and law enforcement settings, node identities must not be revealed. We use the term hostile to mean that communication is being monitored by adversarial entities that are not part of the MANET. The need to hide node identities becomes more pressing if we further assume that MANET nodes do not trust each other, due to a suspicious environment where nodes can be compromised. In such an environment, it is natural for node movements to be obscured, such that tracking a given node is impossible or, at least, very difficult. While we do not claim that such suspicious and hostile location-based MANET environments are commonplace, they do occur and require high security and privacy guarantees. While doing all these;there is a challenge for nodes to maintain anonymity protection from outside observers or malicious attackers. Full anonymity protection can be achieved only when ;sources,destinations and routes all are protected. In this work, to offer better anonymity protection, we propose an Anonymous Position-based Security Aware Routing Protocol (APSAR). Experimental results exhibit consistency with the theoretical analysis, and show that APSAR achieves better route anonymity protection compared to other anonymous routing protocols. Also, APSAR achieves comparable routing efficiency to the GPSR geographical routing protocol. The work in this thesis addresses a number of security and privacy issues arising in position-based MANETs. models. We address the problem of position based security aware routing in consideration with better anonymity protection .

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Module
Author:
priyanka malgi
Date Added:
10/12/2017
APSC 100 Tiny House Project – Simple Book Publishing
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This book exists primarily to support Project 677 in APSC 100 in the Faculty of Engineering at Queen’s University during the winter term of 2019. It provides a publicly visible collection of information that will help with this design project. Use of these resources elsewhere under the CC license is encouraged, but not supported. The contents of this book will grow and change over the term. Please fell free to add your comments or questions in any of the sections and I will try to address them.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Rick Sellens
Date Added:
03/25/2019
Abdominal Cavity and Laparoscopic Surgery
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For students interested in studying biomechanical engineering, especially in the field of surgery, this lesson serves as an anatomy and physiology primer of the abdominopelvic cavity. Students are introduced to the abdominopelvic cavity—a region of the body that is the focus of laparoscopic surgery—as well as the benefits and drawbacks of laparoscopic surgery. Understanding the abdominopelvic environment and laparoscopic surgery is critical for biomechanical engineers who design laparoscopic surgical tools.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Benjamin S. Terry
Brandi N. Briggs
Denise W. Carlson
Stephanie Rivale
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Ablative Shield Egg Data Sheet
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You will present students with a challenge: build a structure from different materials that will protect a model of the Ares launch vehicles (a raw egg) from the heat of a propane torch for as long as possible. Then they design, build, test, and revise their own thermal protection systems. They document their designs with sketches and written descriptions. As a culmination, students compile their results into a poster and present them to the class.

This activity explores the concepts of energy transfer with the following standards:
• Energy is a property of many substances and is associated with heat and light.
• Heat moves in predictable ways, flowing from warmer objects to cooler ones, until both reach the same temperature.

Subject:
Engineering
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
heather mahon (berk)
Date Added:
09/27/2018
Able Sports
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This activity focuses on getting the students to think about disabilities and how they can make some aspects of life more difficult. The students are asked to pick a disability and design a new kind of sport for it.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Author:
Bonniejean Boettcher
Date Added:
09/26/2008
About Accuracy and Approximation
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Students learn about the concepts of accuracy and approximation as they pertain to robotics, gain insight into experimental accuracy, and learn how and when to estimate values that they measure. Students also explore sources of error stemming from the robot setup and rounding numbers.

Subject:
Engineering
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Ronald Poveda
Date Added:
09/18/2014