Search Results (36)

View
Selected filters:
  • Special Education
Adapted Physical Education--Basketball Fundamentals
Rating

Adapted Physical Education Class BasketballLesson OverviewDate: January 28, 2018                                                   Grade Level: 6-8Concept: Basketball Shooting and PassingObjectives:Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the concept of shooting a basketball by standing at a certain distance from a basketball hoop and shooting a ball in the direction of the hoop up to 5 times in a row with 80% accuracy. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the concept of passing a basketball to a partner by standing a certain distance from a partner and passing a ball in the direction of that person up to 5 times in a row with 80% accuracy. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of catching a basketball by attempting to catch a ball thrown at them at least 5 times in a row with 80% accuracy. Introduction:Ask students what their background knowledge of basketball is. What “things” do you need to play? Have you ever watched a basketball game? Two videos will be shown to the class prior to beginning the lesson. The first video is of a high school special needs basketball player who makes an incredible shot in his only game ever played. The second video is of a basketball game played entirely with students who have various disabilities. Both video links are provided and should provide motivation for the class to play basketball. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUztRvfhDT8https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJFr5KVdEXA Vocabulary:Chest Pass- the basketball is passed directly from the passer 's chest to the receiver 's chest.Bounce Pass- the basketball bounces about two-thirds of the way from the passer to the receiver.Overhead Pass- the player holds the ball over their head with both hands and then tosses the ball to a teammate.Shooting form- Put the ball in your shooting hand make sure your body is square to the basket, and put your feet shoulder width apart, and also put your elbow in towards your body. Body of Lesson:After watching the introduction videos, students will come into the gym and partner up. One ball will be given to each set of partners. Students will stand 5-10 feet away from each other depending on the level of comfort felt by students to catch a ball. The instructor will demonstrate a chest pass and then have students practice this pass several times back and forth with their partner. The instructor will come around and help any students who are in need of assistance. When students are comfortable with this type of pass they may begin to back up and get farther away from their partner. These same steps will be repeated for the bounce pass and the overhead pass. Depending on student strength, they may begin these skills with a balloon or beach ball to gain confidence and correct form before moving on to the basketball.After the instructor is able to assess each student on each type of pass, the class will move on to shooting. The instructor will demonstrate the correct shooting form and then students will be allowed to go to a basket to practice this form. One student will shoot while their partner rebounds the ball for them, after ten shots the students will switch roles. Students will be instructed to start only a few feet away from the basket until they are able to make two shots in a row, afterwards they can move back another few feet until they are unable to make a shot. The instructor will walk around the gym and make any shooting corrections that are needed and assess each student on their ability to shoot a basketball at the hoop. Depending on disability, students may feel more comfortable and confident using a hula hoop for the basketball hoop and/or garbage can as a larger surface.Multiple Intelligences:Students will use the following multiple intelligences through participation in Adaptive PE:•Kinesthetic-Students who enjoy being on the go as much as possible. Learn best by doing—hands-on activities and incorporate body movement. Examples in PE class would be walking, passing and shooting the basketball.•Interpersonal-Those students who show good social skills and partake in group or team activities. Examples in PE class would be partnering up to pass the ball back and forth, participating in a mock basketball game.•Musical-Rhythmic-Students connect to an activity through familiar tunes of music. Examples in PE—having a song to keep rhythm of passing the ball back and forth.  Accommodations/Modifications: Multiple accommodations are made depending on the abilities of the students in the class. These are as follows:Deaf/Hearing Impairment 1. Brighter ball helps to make up for a player calling your name to pass you the ball. 2. Lights to signal a whistle. 3. Make hand signaled plays not verbal. 4. Give a written outline of the day’s events. Cognitive Impairments 1. Repeat instructions clearly and slowly. 2. Quick/simple instructions. 3. Use larger materials (beach balls and hula hoops) 4. Give motivation for small goals (catch a ball) then work higher (make a basket). 5. Enhance success rate by awarding points for passes and catches. 6. Many rules can be changed (allow double dribbling, no time limit in the lane, etc.). Visual Impairment 1. Orient player on the court and give an area to cover. 2. Brighter colored equipment. 3. Brighter boundary lines. 4. Beeper in the ball. 5. Lighted hoops. 6. In drills, use a ball retrieving device or set up in partners. 7. Catch the ball with arms extended to feel the ball and bring into the body. 8. Call the person’s name before passing to them. 9. Bounce passes are easier to track and slower pace. 10. Place a beeper behind the goal to help in aiming at the target. Orthopedic Impairment 1. Use the two-hand chest pass. 2. When shooting, do not go head on; easier to go slightly to the non-dominant side. 3. Adaptations to the game a. Travel if more than two pushes are taken with ball in lap. b. Can only dribble twice then must pass, shoot, or take two additional pushes. c. Remain seated at all times. d. Place all players in wheelchairs. One Arm Involvement 1. Trap the ball with the body to catch the ball. 2. Throw with one arm. 3. Overhead passes for long throws. 4. Stop dribble then place ball on the hand for a shot. One Leg Involvement 1. Bring the ball to the side of the body instead of towards the body to catch the ball. 2. Students who use crutches can use the one arm throw. 3. Students who use crutches are successful with the one arm shot. 4. One regular crutch and one Lofstrand crutch helps to free one arm quickly(Adaptation and modification information was compiled by Jenny Walter,  Adapted Physical Education student at Manchester College, Spring 2008).Assessment: Formative assessment: Observation will be used throughout the lesson to correct student form and give feedback. Students who are completing the passes and shooting correctly will be allowed to move farther distances away from their target to increase difficulty for those who are capable of performing the skills. Summative assessment: The instructor will have a checklist for each student to determine if they met the objectives for the day. The checklist is attached.  Materials: Computer, projector, internet access, several basketballs (beach balls, balloons, lighter basketballs), basketball hoops (hula hoops, garbage cans), beeper balls, beeper cones, whistles, specialized equipment lights, specialized brightly colored balls, boundaries, targets, etc. Standard(s): A physically educated individual:·       Demonstrates competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities.·       Demonstrates understanding of movement concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply to the learning and performance of physical activities.·       Participates regularly in physical activity.·       Exhibits responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others in physical activity settings.·       Values physical activity for health enjoyment challenge, self-expression and/or social interaction.·       PE 8.1.2 Students demonstrate critical elements of specialized manipulative skills in modified team activities.·       PE 8.2.4 Students engage in a variety of physical activities that will enhance health-related fitness (inside and/or outside of school).  

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Abby Deprey
Adapted Physical Education Class Basketball
Rating

Chelsey Loomis and Abby DepreyDate: January 28, 2018                                                   Grade Level: 6-8Concept: Basketball Shooting and PassingObjectives:Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the concept of shooting a basketball by standing at a certain distance from a basketball hoop and shooting a ball in the direction of the hoop at least 5 times in a row. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the concept of passing a basketball to a partner by standing a certain distance from a partner and passing a ball in the direction of that person at least 5 times in a row. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of catching a basketball by attempting to catch a ball thrown at them at least 5 times in a row. Introduction:Two videos will be shown to the class prior to beginning the lesson. The first video is of a high school special needs basketball player who makes an incredible shot in his only game ever played. The second video is of a basketball game played entirely with students who have various disabilities. Both video links are provided and should provide motivation for the class to play basketball. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUztRvfhDT8https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJFr5KVdEXA Vocabulary:Chest Pass- the basketball is passed directly from the passer 's chest to the receiver 's chest.Bounce Pass- the basketball bounces about two-thirds of the way from the passer to the receiver.Overhead Pass- the player holds the ball over their head with both hands and then tosses the ball to a teammate.Shooting form- Put the ball in your shooting hand make sure your body is square to the basket, and put your feet shoulder width apart, and also put your elbow in towards your body. Body of Lesson:After watching the introduction videos, students will come into the gym and partner up. One ball will be given to each set of partners. Students will stand 5-10 feet away from each other depending on the level of comfort felt by students to catch a ball. The instructor will demonstrate a chest pass and then have students practice this pass several times back and forth with their partner. The instructor will come around and help any students who are in need of assistance. When students are comfortable with this type of pass they may begin to back up and get farther away from their partner. These same steps will be repeated for the bounce pass and the overhead pass. Depending on student strength, they may begin these skills with a balloon or beach ball to gain confidence and correct form before moving on to the basketball.After the instructor is able to assess each student on each type of pass, the class will move on to shooting. The instructor will demonstrate the correct shooting form and then students will be allowed to go to a basket to practice this form. One student will shoot while their partner rebounds the ball for them, after ten shots the students will switch roles. Students will be instructed to start only a few feet away from the basket until they are able to make two shots in a row, afterwards they can move back another few feet until they are unable to make a shot. The instructor will walk around the gym and make any shooting corrections that are needed and assess each student on their ability to shoot a basketball at the hoop. Depending on disability, students may feel more comfortable and confident using a hula hoop for the basketball hoop and/or garbage can as a larger surface.Multiple Intelligences:Students will use the following multiple intelligences through participation in Adaptive PE:•Kinesthetic-Students who enjoy being on the go as much as possible. Learn best by doing—hands-on activities and incorporate body movement•Interpersonal-Those students who show good social skills and partake in group or team activities•Musical-Rhythmic-Students connect to an activity through familiar tunes of music.  Accommodations/Modifications: Multiple accommodations are made depending on the abilities of the students in the class. These are as follows:Deaf/Hearing Impairment 1. Brighter ball helps to make up for a player calling your name to pass you the ball. 2. Lights to signal a whistle. 3. Make hand signaled plays not verbal. 4. Give a written outline of the day’s events. Cognitive Impairments 1. Repeat instructions clearly and slowly. 2. Quick/simple instructions. 3. Use larger materials (beach balls and hula hoops) 4. Give motivation for small goals (catch a ball) then work higher (make a basket). 5. Enhance success rate by awarding points for passes and catches. 6. Many rules can be changed (allow double dribbling, no time limit in the lane, etc.). Visual Impairment 1. Orient player on the court and give an area to cover. 2. Brighter colored equipment. 3. Brighter boundary lines. 4. Beeper in the ball. 5. Lighted hoops. 6. In drills, use a ball retrieving device or set up in partners. 7. Catch the ball with arms extended to feel the ball and bring into the body. 8. Call the person’s name before passing to them. 9. Bounce passes are easier to track and slower pace. 10. Place a beeper behind the goal to help in aiming at the target. Orthopedic Impairment 1. Use the two-hand chest pass. 2. When shooting, do not go head on; easier to go slightly to the non-dominant side. 3. Adaptations to the game a. Travel if more than two pushes are taken with ball in lap. b. Can only dribble twice then must pass, shoot, or take two additional pushes. c. Remain seated at all times. d. Place all players in wheelchairs. One Arm Involvement 1. Trap the ball with the body to catch the ball. 2. Throw with one arm. 3. Overhead passes for long throws. 4. Stop dribble then place ball on the hand for a shot. One Leg Involvement 1. Bring the ball to the side of the body instead of towards the body to catch the ball. 2. Students who use crutches can use the one arm throw. 3. Students who use crutches are successful with the one arm shot. 4. One regular crutch and one Lofstrand crutch helps to free one arm quickly(Adaptation and modification information was compiled by Jenny Walter,  Adapted Physical Education student at Manchester College, Spring 2008).Assessment: Formative assessment: Observation will be used throughout the lesson to correct student form and give feedback. Students who are completing the passes and shooting correctly will be allowed to move farther distances away from their target to increase difficulty for those who are capable of performing the skills. Summative assessment: The instructor will have a checklist for each student to determine if they met the objectives for the day. The checklist is attached.  Materials: Computer, projector, internet access, several basketballs (beach balls, balloons, lighter basketballs), basketball hoops (hula hoops, garbage cans), beeper balls, beeper cones, whistles, specialized equipment lights, specialized brightly colored balls, boundaries, targets, etc. Standard(s): A physically educated individual:·         Demonstrates competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities.·         Demonstrates understanding of movement concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply to the learning and performance of physical activities.·         Participates regularly in physical activity.·         Exhibits responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others in physical activity settings.·         Values physical activity for health enjoyment challenge, self-expression and/or social interaction.·         PE 8.1.2 Students demonstrate critical elements of specialized manipulative skills in modified team activities.·         PE 8.2.4 Students engage in a variety of physical activities that will enhance health-related fitness (inside and/or outside of school). 

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Special Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Chelsey Loomis
Blended Learning Professional Development Online Course
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this online learning module, you will: 1: Understand blended learning models2: Learn to design blended learning experiences

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Education
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Higher Education
Language Education (ESL)
Special Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
The Case of the Ineffective Special Educator: Instructional Challenges of a First Year Principal
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This case was developed to use in leadership courses with specific implications for school law and supervision of instruction. Varied data are presented about the school and district for students to analyze. School instructional policies of inclusion of special needs students and supervision of teachers play a role in the course of events at Washington Elementary School. Dr. Long, a first year principal faces the challenge of addressing the issue of a special education teacher who does not perform responsibilities, and there are direct implications for district personnel procedures regarding providing teachers with assistance.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Fran Crochet
Leslie Jones
Developing Sound Aligned Assessments and Rubrics
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Are we teaching what we think we are teaching?""Are students learning what they are supposed to be learning?""Is there a way to teach the subject better, therefore promoting better learning?"In problem based learning, assessment needs to not only reflect the learning process but the content being learned as well.This online learning module will explore the following learning targets: •Identify how formative and summative classroom assessments are integral to instruction.•Recognize and develop high-quality performance assessments for evaluating student work.•Recognize and develop high-quality rubrics for evaluating student work.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Education
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Educational Theory and Practice I, Fall 2011
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course is designed to prepare you for a successful student teaching experience. Some of the major themes and activities are: analysis of yourself as a teacher and as a learner, subject knowledge, adolescent development, student learning styles, lesson planning, assessment strategies, classroom management techniques and differentiated instruction. The course requires significant personal involvement and time. You will observe high school classes, begin to pursue a more active role in the classroom in the latter part of the semester, do reflective writings on what you see and think (journal), design and teach a mini-lesson, design a major curriculum unit and engage in our classroom discussions and activities.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Reen Gibb
Family Involvement in the Education of Secondary-School-Age Students With Disabilities
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Family support for learning is important for all students, but it may be particularly important for children with disabilities. One of the main tenets of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Action is parents’ participation in decision making related to their children’s education. However, despite legislative support for parental involvement, little information has been available until now to examine the actual level of family support for education that is given to middle- and high-school-age students with disabilities.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Harvard Graduate School of Education
Provider Set:
Harvard Family Research Project
Goal Setting for Children with Learning Disabilities: Parents' Role
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Here are some ways to help your children, students, clients, and people with learning disabilities set their own goals and reach them. Children should also be encouraged to set goals for learning, personal growth, and their future. When children learn to set goals and reach them, they can visualize their future, make good choices, and make their dreams come true. The Frostig Center did twenty years of research on what makes people with learning disabilities successful as adults: goal setting was one of six success attributes.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities
Provider Set:
LD Online
Helping Parents Deal with the Fact Their Child Has a Disability
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Being told that your child has a disability can be as traumatizing as learning of a family member's sudden death. Many parents are stunned by such news. Receiving such a message can produce overwhelming emotions of shock, disbelief, anxiety, fear, and despair. Within that moment, research has shown that some parents cannot distinguish between the unconscious wish for an idealized normal child from an unthinkable, sudden reality of one who is not. Here is help for teachers working with parents of children with disabilities.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities
Provider Set:
LD Online
Helping Students Develop The Skills For Focus and Attention (General Ed, K-12)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Student Primers, Instructional Strategies, Study Strategies and Recommended Apps, Games, Activities, etc. geared towards helping students develop skills for Focus and Attention. Optional links to thousands of teacher-reviewed resources. 

Subject:
Education
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Language Education (ESL)
Special Education
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Eric Weinstein
The Importance of Teaching 21st Century Skills
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Every school system is unique, but we are all connected by a shared aspiration: that all students have an educational experience that prepares them for success in college, in careers, and in life. Now more than ever, educators must not only provide rigorous academic content, but we must also be more intentional about fostering critical thinking, communication, collaboration, creativity, and other 21st century skills that our young people need to navigate this complex, rapidly changing world. Download this common cartridge file for professional learning on 21st Century Skills

Subject:
Education
Early Childhood Development
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Introduction to Technology Integration
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

The goal of this module is to give teachers an overview of the basic considerations concerning integrating technology in the classroom to meet the needs of all learners.
Users:
Higher Education Instructors: This module could be integrated into a content area course or used as a mini course on technology integration.
Librarians: This module could be used as an in-service tool to introduce teachers to technology integration, library resources and how the librarian and teacher can work together to select, implement, and assess technology to enhance student learning.
Self-Paced Study: Anyone can work through the module at their own pace for professional development.

The goal of this module is to give teachers an overview of the basic considerations concerning integrating technology in the classroom to meet the needs of all learners.

The learner will assess their access to technology and their personal beliefs and attitudes about technology.
Learning Objectives

The learner will examine two models of technology integration.

TPACK - Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

SAMR Model of Technology Integration

The Common Core Standards that are related to technology and digital media will be examined.

Learners will choose a common core standard that suggests using technology and/or digital sources of information and identify technology(s) that will support the standard and enhance the learning environment. The focus will be on selecting technology for the content area (TK and CK) and determine the level of SAMR addressed in the application of the technology

Learners will reflect on best practices for maximizing using technology

Learners will use a technology evaluation rubric to evaluate a technology tool selected to meet a specific learning goal.

Learners will examine the important considerations regarding ethical and safe use of technology and Internet use.

Learners will examine and evaluate the “Privacy Policy” of two educational game companies.

Learners will develop a Technology Integration Professional Development Plan that will include their areas of need and a timeline and resources (network/PLC).

Subject:
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Higher Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Paula Lombardi
Looking for Support
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

An elementary special education teacher talks about finding support in challenging situations. Kira Martin has had more different experiences in her six years of teaching than some people have in a whole career. She taught Language Arts for the Peace Corps in Granada for two years. On returning to the United States, she taught Š—“cross-categorical special educationŠ— in first through third grades both as a resource teacher and in a self-contained classroom. The following year she taught sixth-grade students with learning disabilities, then math and social studies to academically gifted sixth graders. After taking a year off to get her masterŠ—Čs degree, she moved to Š—“a straight fourth grade classroom,Š— and finally to fourth grade AIG Academically and Intellectually Gifted math.Š—Not all of these situations have been ideal, but in every school she was able to build a support network that helped her to grow professionally and personally.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Special Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Articles & More
Author:
Kathleen Casson
A Module for the Administration of Homebound Instructional Programs
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Special program and other school administrators regularly confront the issue of whether students under their charge are entitled to receive homebound instruction and if so, what procedures and criteria they should apply in coming to a proper decision. Where a student is entitled to such services the administrator must decide what subjects must be taught as well as their duration, intensity and frequency. Although virtually all state legislatures have addressed a student’s right to receive homebound instruction the right to such benefits may intersect with those arising under federal laws such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act {IDEA/2004), the Rehabilitation Act (§ 504) and the Americans with Disabilities Act, thereby creating confusion for many administrators. In June, 2007 the Virginia Department of Education (“VDE”) promulgated Instructional Services guidelines implementing the state’s statutory requirements. Since the problems of homebound instruction school administrators face are substantially similar across jurisdictions the 2007 VDE guidelines provide an outstanding pedagogical vehicle for educational leadership and policy students in Virginia to practice making decisions about educational entitlements in a safe way. Moreover, it affords them an opportunity to develop analytical and interpretive skills which are transferable to other contexts. It also affords the students an opportunity to consider how local policies are developed and the importance of including the right stakeholders in that process. The author has designed a series of fact patterns where students are asked to apply the VDE guidelines to those patterns. The patterns and their questions can easily be adapted to fit the requirements of other state jurisdictions.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Lewis Wasserman