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ADA National Network
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The ADA National Network provides informal guidance on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other disability-related laws. The ten regional Centers that comprise the ADA National Network staff a toll-free information line and respond to inquiries submitted online via email or regional Center websites.

Business owners, architects and designers, representatives of state and local government agencies, employers, people with disabilities and their family members, service providers, educational entities, and others interested in the ADA can receive individualized responses - Find Your Region/ADA Center.

Our ADA Specialists can answer most questions immediately and, if necessary, will research complex questions to provide you the most thorough guidance possible. Referrals to local and state/territory resources for disability issues, which are not addressed by the ADA, can also be provided.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
ADA National Network
Date Added:
11/23/2022
ADA National Network
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The ADA National Network offers a variety of training opportunities to increase your knowledge of the ADA. We provide training on all ADA topics and on all levels from basic to advanced. Trainings are available in-person, webcast, and online.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
ADA National Newtwork
Date Added:
11/23/2022
AEM Basics
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AIM or AEM?
Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) are materials designed or converted in a way that makes them usable across the widest range of student variability regardless of format. In relation to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the term AIM refers to print instructional materials that have been transformed into four specialized formats (audio, braille, digital, and large print text). Sometimes students with disabilities have difficulty accessing print in the same way as their peers. To succeed in school, these students need learning materials presented in a way that works for them. In 2014, the term "accessible educational materials" or "AEM" was expanded to include both print- and technology-based educational materials including electronic textbooks, and related core materials. Practically speaking the terms AIM and AEM are often used interchangeably.

In the following video learn from AEM users, educators, parents, and state and national leaders about how AEM can be a game changer for those with print disabilities.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Assistive Technology and Accessible Educational Materials Center
Date Added:
11/23/2022
AEM Center: K-12 Critical Components of the Quality Indicators for the Provision of Accessible Educational Materials & Accessible Technologies
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The purpose of the National AEM Center’s Quality Indicators with Critical Components for K-12 is to assist state and local education agencies with planning, implementing, and evaluating systems for providing accessible materials and technologies for all students who need them. States and local school districts will find the Quality Indicators useful for implementing statutory requirements that mandate equitable access to learning opportunities for students with disabilities, including equal access to printed materials, digital materials, and technologies.

Subject:
Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
CAST
Date Added:
08/11/2022
AEM Pilot
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AEM Pilot Home
Welcome to the AEM Pilot*, an interactive web-based tool that guides states and K-12 school districts to create more inclusive learning environments for students with disabilities. Building background knowledge about accessible educational materials (AEM), conducting self-assessments, and monitoring continuous progress are all facilitated by the AEM Pilot. If your state or district has work to do to improve the accessibility of the materials and technologies provided to learners with disabilities, take off with the AEM Pilot!

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
CAST
Date Added:
11/23/2022
AEM for Families – Maine-AEM
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AEM for Families
Accessible Educational Materials: The following resources will assist students and families with questions regarding Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) and Assistive Technology (AT):

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Maine AEM Program
Date Added:
11/23/2022
ARBORIZAÇÃO URBANA:PROPOSTA DE SEQUÊNCIA DIDÁTICA SOBRE OS BENEFÍCIOS DAS ÁRVORES
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
5.0 stars

ESTE PRODUTO EDUCACIONAL FOI PRODUZIDO A PARTIR DE UM ESTUDO DE PESQUISA DE MESTRADO,VOLTADO A CAPACITAÇÃO DE PROFESSORES DA EDUCAÇÃO BASICA NA MODALIDADE ESPECIAL.O QUAL FOI PRODUZIDA UMA SEQUENCIA DIDÁTICA COMO ESTRATEGIA DIDÁTICA PARA SE TRABALHAR O TEMA ARBORIZAÇÃO URBANA E EDUCAÇÃO AMBIENTAL.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Education
Special Education
Ecology
Material Type:
Primary Source
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
APARECIDA ALVES DOS SANTOS LUSTOSA
MARLI SCHMITT ZANELLA
Date Added:
08/05/2021
About Accessible Formats
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Understanding accessible formats requires some background knowledge of the barriers many learners with disabilities experience when reading or accessing information in print-based and certain digital-based materials.

"Text-based" refers to materials with static or fixed text and images, such as textbooks and supplemental text materials. Both print and digital materials can be text-based. For example, an electronic textbook that replicates a standard print textbook is considered a text-based material.

Books in standard print are common examples of text-based materials. To successfully use print, learners need functional skills related to sensory, physical, and cognitive abilities. Some learners may have visual disabilities that make it difficult to see the text and images on the page. Other learners may be unable to hold printed materials because of a physical disability. Still others may be unable to read or derive meaning from the printed text because of a learning disability.

Certain digital materials also have text and images. Specifically, text-based digital materials are not consistently designed for use with assistive technology (AT). Some learners use AT to read and navigate text and images in digital materials. Screen readers, text to speech, and switches are a few examples of AT devices and software that learners with a wide range of disabilities use. To prevent barriers for learners who use AT, see Vetting for Accessibility.

Because of the frequent barriers presented by text-based materials, some learners with disabilities need alternative forms, known as accessible formats. Examples of accessible formats include audio, braille, large print, tactile graphics, and digital text conforming with accessibility standards.

The term accessible format is defined in section 121 of the Copyright Act, known as the Chafee Amendment:

Subject:
Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
National Center on Accessible Educational Materials
Date Added:
08/11/2022
About the AEM Center at CAST
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About the AEM Center at CAST
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National Center on Accessible Educational Materials logo
Based at CAST, the AEM Center is funded by the Office of Special Education Programs at the U.S. Department of Education. We work with states and districts to build capacity for developing and sustaining robust systems for providing accessible materials and technologies for all learners who need them. To us, accessibility means that individuals with disabilities—from early childhood through the workforce—have equal access to materials and technologies for reaching educational outcomes and advancing in employment.

We provide three levels of technical assistance:

Universal technical assistance is available to everyone. You’ll find products and services throughout our website and collected on our resources page. Webinars and conference presentations are listed on our events page.
Targeted technical assistance describes the Center's strategic collaborations to address problems of practice in early childhood programs, higher education, and workforce development. Supports for families are also a part of our targeted technical assistance.
Intensive technical assistance describes the Center's capacity-building activities with a small cohort of states. This partnership is designed to produce practices that can be scaled nationally.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
National Center On Accessible Educational Materials
Date Added:
11/23/2022
About the National Center on Deaf-Blindness
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What We Do
There are approximately 10,000 children and youth in the United States who have been identified as deaf-blind. Deaf-blindness is a low-incidence disability and within this population there is great variability in terms of age, race/ethnicity, cause of deaf-blindness, and severity and type of hearing and vision loss. Ninety percent have additional physical, medical, or cognitive disabilities.

As a national technical assistance center, NCDB works with state deaf-blind projects and other partners to improve educational results and quality of life for children who are deaf-blind and their families.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
National Center on Deaf-Blindness
Date Added:
11/23/2022
Access & Accommodations for Students Experiencing Deaf or Hard on Hearing
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Accommodations are provided by a school, employer, or other institution to ensure deaf people are able to fully access all the experiences and activities offered. There are many different types of accommodations, ranging from interpreters to extra time for testing.

In order to ensure equitable opportunities and effective communication for all students, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act mandate that reasonable accommodations be provided when requested.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
National Deaf Center
Date Added:
11/23/2022
Accessibility of Educational Materials
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K-12 classrooms are embracing technology and are working to overcome accessibility issues associated with digital and online educational materials. While there are legal accessibility standards in place (see resources below), educational materials are not always accessible to students with visual impairments or blindness. Most developers – and the companies who produce digital/online educational materials – are more aware of accessibility and are often striving to incorporate accessibility into their products. For some, the lack of awareness and/or the lack of accessibility knowledge is a key factor. This is especially true with educational app developers who produce a small apps geared for emerging readers or basic math apps for young students.

Many larger organizations that are creating digital textbooks and online assignments have a small accessibility team. Unfortunately, accessibility is not always given priority and companies need a gentle push to bring or keep accessibility as a priority goal. States and school districts do have the power of writing accessibility into their contracts with providers.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Perkins School For The Blind
Date Added:
11/23/2022