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Mathematical Analysis, Volume 1
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Mathematical Analysis, Volume I was written by Dr. Elias Zakon of the ...

Mathematical Analysis, Volume I was written by Dr. Elias Zakon of the University of Windsor and submitted to the Open Textbook Challenge by Dr. Bradley Lucier of Purdue University. According to the preface, "One of [the] main objectives is updating the undergraduate analysis as a rigorous postcalculus course... [without losing] contacts with classical texts still widely in use."

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Author:
Elias Zakon
English Language Arts 10
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This course is oriented toward US high school students in grade 10. ...

This course is oriented toward US high school students in grade 10. Its structure and materials are aligned to the US Common Core Standards. You will be expected to build literary analysis from the texts as well as outside sources of knowledge. By the conclusion of this course, you will be prepared for the material in upper level high school English courses (and, subsequently, collegiate texts). You will be able to read and interpret more autonomously, and you will be able to handle more rigorous texts with fewer instructional supports

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Arts and Humanities
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Saylor ELA 10 Unit 5: Up from Slavery
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After having learned rhetoric and studied examples of historical speeches, it is ...

After having learned rhetoric and studied examples of historical speeches, it is sensible to follow that by reading a longer, historically significant text. Up from Slavery, by Booker T. Washington, is a piece of influential nonfiction literature that provides a window into America’s history while allowing you to hone your reading comprehension, analysis, and evaluation skills.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Author:
Karen Breazeale
History of Europe, 1000 to 1800
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This course will introduce the student to the history of Europe from ...

This course will introduce the student to the history of Europe from the medieval period to the Age of Revolutions in the eighteenth century. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Europe during this 800-year period including the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, European expansion overseas, and the French Revolution. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Europe had transformed from a fragmented and volatile network of medieval polities into a series of independent nation-states by 1800. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Think critically and analytically about European history in the medieval and early modern eras; Identify and describe the religious, intellectual, social, and political components of the European Middle Ages; Identify the origins and characteristics of the Italian and Northern European Renaissance, as well as describe new developments in art, philosophy, religion, architecture, and science during the era of ĺÎĺĺĺŤrebirthĄ_ĺĺö; Identify and describe the causes and effects of the European Age of Discovery. Students will also be able to analyze the impact of overseas expansion on European monarchies, the world economy, and indigenous peoples; Describe and analyze the Protestant Reformation. Students will be able to identify the origins of the movement, the various inflections of the Reformation across Europe, and the Catholic Counter Reformation; Identify the era of religious warfare that plagued Europe after the Protestant Reformation. Students will analyze causes and effects of the religious conflicts that erupted in France, England, the Netherlands, and the Holy Roman Empire; Identify and explain why and how 'absolute' monarchs gained power in western Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Students will also be able to identify and describe why two nations - England and the Netherlands - embraced constitutionalism rather than absolutism; Assess how and why absolutism characterized the monarchies of Prussia and Austria in the 1600s. Students will also be able to identify and describe the development of Russia and the reign of Peter the Great; Identify the origins and characteristics of the Scientific Revolution, as well as describe its impact on European civilization as a whole; Identify the origins of the European Enlightenment and assess how this movement altered the social, political, and religious fabric of Europe; Identify and describe the social and economic changes that swept across Europe during the eighteenth century. Students will be able to assess the origin and impact of the 'agricultural revolution,' the marked increase in Europe's population, the development of 'cottage industries,' the rise of the Atlantic economy, and the changes in domestic and religious practices; Identify and describe the origins and impact of the French Revolution. Students will also be able to analyze the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century, using historical research methods. (History 201)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
World Cultures
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Try College 101
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This course is designed to equip the student with the basic academic, ...

This course is designed to equip the student with the basic academic, professional, and personal skills needed in college. Of course, some of the skills this course presents may take a lifetime to master! Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: clarify and state your individual educational goals, and formulate specific plans to work towards the goals; design and implement a personal time management plan; identify your preferred learning style; describe and employ critical thinking and creative thinking skills; adequately describe effective listening, note taking, memory retention, and writing skills, and methods for improving these skills; identify and accurately judge the credibility of websites; describe and use different methods of exam preparation; explain test anxiety and list strategies for reducing it; describe the interview process and strategies for successful interviewing; create a resume and a cover letter. This free course may be completed online at any time. It has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. (Try College 101)

Subject:
Higher Education
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ECON102: Principles of Macroeconomics
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Economics is traditionally divided into two parts: microeconomics and macroeconomics. The purpose ...

Economics is traditionally divided into two parts: microeconomics and macroeconomics. The purpose of this course is to provide you with a fundamental understanding of the principles of macroeconomics. Macroeconomists study how a country’s economy works and try to determine the best choices to improve the overall wellbeing of a nation. Typical topics include inflation (the overall level of prices), employment, fiscal policy (government taxing and spending), and money and banking (interest rates and lending policies). Individuals and firms need to consider how macroeconomic events will affect their own prosperity. To better define macroeconomics, consider its distinction from microeconomics. Imagine you are attempting to figure out how the price of a certain good has been determined. Microeconomics would focus on how supply and demand determine prices, while macroeconomics would study the determination of prices at all levels. To test particular policies and ideas, or to find out the causes of good macroeconomic performance, we need to have some measure of overall economic activity. For this reason, macroeconomics uses aggregates (totals) to measure key concepts such as national income, output, unemployment, inflation, and business cycles (periodic expansions and contractions of economic activity). By studying macroeconomics and understanding the critical ideas and tools used to measure economic data, you will have a better perspective on the issues and problems discussed in contemporary economics. This course will ask you to think critically about the national and global issues we currently face. It will also introduce the tools and principles you need to draw your own conclusions in an informed manner.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Economics
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The Saylor Foundation
Introduction to Financial Accounting (Business 103)
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Accounting can be considered the language of business. If you are learning ...

Accounting can be considered the language of business. If you are learning accounting for the first time, embracing its foundational concepts may be a challenging process. Mastery of accounting primarily rests in your ability to critically think through and synthesize the information as it applies to a given situation. You should approach the learning of accounting the same way you would approach learning a foreign language; It will take time and practice to ensure you remember the concepts. There are a number of sub-disciplines that fall under the umbrella of "accounting,” but in this course, we will be focused on financial accounting.

Subject:
Accounting
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Full Course
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The Saylor Foundation
Managerial Accounting (Business 105)
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Almost all management decisions deal with the same key issues: cost, price, ...

Almost all management decisions deal with the same key issues: cost, price, and profit. This course will examine this sort of decision-making, identifying the tools and methods managers use to make the best-informed decisions possible. We will begin with an introduction to the terms that will be referenced in the later units. We will then discuss the various methods and theories that managers deploy when tracking costs and profits. The final section will explain how managers report the overall performance of a firm or department for internal use. Upon completion of this course, students will be better prepared to make informed decisions within a firm.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Accounting
Management
Material Type:
Full Course
Reading
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
English Language Arts 11
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English III, American Literature, explores the literature of America from the narratives ...

English III, American Literature, explores the literature of America from the narratives of the early colonists to the foundational documents of our forefathers, and the literature of our modern times. In English III, you will gain a firm grasp of the various literary periods throughout American history as well as the ability to analyze different genres and styles of notable American authors. As you progress through the course, you will gain an appreciation for American literature and an understanding of how the literature of the day acted as a reflection of the historical period from which it evolved. This course will also give you the opportunity to hone your own writing skills as you identify the characteristics of effective writing for a variety of different purposes and audiences.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Foundation Skills
U.S. History
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Activity/Lab
Full Course
Reading
Unit of Study
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The Saylor Foundation
Early Globalizations: East Meets West (1200s-1600s)
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the world's ...

This course will introduce the student to the history of the world's major civilizations from medieval times to the early modern era. The student will learn about the pivotal political, economic, and social changes that took place in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Europe during this period. By the end of the course, the student will understand how many different civilizations evolved from isolated societies into expansive, interconnected empires capable of exerting global influence. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Think critically and analytically about world history in the medieval and early modern eras; Identify and describe the emergence, decline, and main features of the Byzantine Empire; Identify the origins and characteristics of the European medieval period and describe the rapidly changing forces at work in society, the economy, and religion during this time; Identify the origins of the Aztec and Inca civilizations and assess how these empires affected socio-economic development in the Americas; Identify the origins of the Tang and Song dynasties in China and assess the impact of these empires on Chinese government, society, religion, and economy during what scholars refer to as the 'golden age'; Identify the origins of the Mongol Empire, which dominated much of Asia in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Students will analyze the nature of this empire created by nomads; Identify the reasons for a changing balance in the world economy in the 1400s and analyze why Europe superseded Asia as the most dominant civilization on the globe; Assess how and why the European Age of Discovery had such a large impact on the New World, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia; Identify the origins and characteristics of the Renaissance and describe its impact on European civilization as a whole; Identify the origins of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe and assess how this movement altered the social, political, and religious fabric of Europe; Identify the origins of colonial Brazil and New Spain. Students will also be able to assess the impact of Spanish and Portuguese colonization on the New World, Africa, and Europe; Identify the origins of the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires and assess the unique characteristics of these dynasties and their impact upon Asia and the world; Identify the origins of the Atlantic slave trade, assessing how this forced migration of peoples affected Africa, Africans, Europe, and the New World; Analyze and describe the Asian trading world, the Ming dynasty in China, the ĺÎĺĺĺŤwarring states,' and early modern eras in Japan; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the medieval period to the early modern era using historical research methods. (History 221)

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Arts and Humanities
Economics
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The Saylor Foundation
Comparative New Worlds, 1400-1750
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This course will introduce the student to a comparative history of New ...

This course will introduce the student to a comparative history of New World societies from 1400 to 1750. The student will learn about European exploration and colonization as well as the culture of native peoples of the Americas. By the end of the course, you will understand how the New World evolved from fledgling settlements into profitable European colonies and how New World societies were highly varied polities. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: analyze what constituted the 'New World' in the fifteenth century; identify and describe the major tribes/native civilizations of North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean at the time of European contact; identify and describe the effects of European colonization on native peoples; identify and describe the reasons for the European Age of Discovery in the New World; identify and describe early New World exploration and initial settlements by Portugal and Spain; identify and describe how and why the consolidation of powerful European states in the 1600s resulted in New World exploration, settlement, and commerce; compare and contrast New France, French Louisiana, the French West Indies, and French Guiana; compare and contrast British North America (New England, Middle and Lower Colonies), the British West Indies, and British Central and South America; compare and contrast New Spain, the Spanish Caribbean, and Spanish South America; analyze and describe Portuguese Brazil; identify and describe the African slave trade and will also be able to compare and contrast the enslavement of Africans in New World societies; identify and describe inter-European conflicts and European-Native Indian violence in the New World; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the causes and effects of exploration and colonization in the New World. (History 321)

Subject:
World History
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Lecture
Lecture Notes
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The Saylor Foundation
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic ...

This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
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Lecture Notes
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The Saylor Foundation
World History in the Early Modern and Modern Eras (1600-Present)
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This course will present a comparative overview of world history from the ...

This course will present a comparative overview of world history from the 17th century to the present era. The student will examine the origins of major economic, political, social, cultural, and technological trends of the past 400 years and explore the impact of these trends on world societies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Think critically about world history in the early modern and modern eras; Assess how global trade networks shaped the economic development of Asia, Europe, and the Americas in the 17th and 18th centuries; Identify the origins of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe and assess the social and political consequences of these movements for the peoples of Europe; Identify the origins of the Enlightenment in Europe and assess how Enlightenment ideas led to political and social revolutions in Europe and the Americas; Identify the origins of the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions in Europe and assess how these intellectual and economic movements altered social, political, and economic life across the globe in the 18th and 19th centuries; Compare and contrast how European imperialism affected the states and peoples of Asia, Africa, and the Americas in the 19th century; Identify the origins of World War I and analyze how the war's outcome altered economic and political balances of power throughout the world; Identify the origins of totalitarian political movements across the globe in the 1920s and 1930s and assess how these movements led to World War II; Analyze how World War II reshaped power balances throughout the world and led to the emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as global superpowers; Assess how decolonization movements in the 1950s and 1960s altered political, economic, and social relationships between the United States, the nations of Europe, and developing countries throughout the world; Assess how the end of the Cold War led to political and economic realignments throughout the world and encouraged the growth of new global markets and systems of trade and information exchange; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 17th century through the present, using historical research methods. (History 103)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
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Lecture Notes
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The Saylor Foundation
The Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World, 1776-1848
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This course introduces the history of the Age of Revolutions in the ...

This course introduces the history of the Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World from 1776 to 1848. Running alongside and extending beyond these political revolutions is the First Industrial Revolution. The Atlantic World, dominated by European empires in 1776, was transformed through revolution into a series of independent states by 1848, experiencing profound changes through the development and consolidation of capitalism. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: think analytically about the history of the revolutionary age between 1776 and 1848; define what a revolution" means as well as describe what made 1776-1848 an "age of revolution"; define the concept of the Atlantic World and describe its importance in World History; explain the basic intellectual and technical movements associated with the Enlightenment and their relations to the revolutionary movements that follow; identify and describe the causes of the American Revolution; identify and describe the many stages of the French Revolution: the end of absolutist monarchy, the implementation of constitutional monarchy, and the rise of the Jacobin Republic; compare and contrast the Declaration of the Rights of Man and other major statements of the Revolutionary period and Enlightenment thinking; identify and describe the impact of the first successful slave rebellion in world history--the Haitian Revolution; compare and contrast the debate between Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the causes and effects of the Age of Revolutions. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 303)

Subject:
World History
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Assessment
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Reading
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Cultural and Literary Expression in the 18th and 19th Centuries
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The period between the Renaissance and the Modern Era are referred to ...

The period between the Renaissance and the Modern Era are referred to as the long 18th and 19th centuries, meaning that they span from around 1680-1830 and 1775-1910 - a time in which so many literary movements and cultural changes took place. In this course, the student will examine these formative cultural and literary developments such as the Enlightenment and Restoration Literature; the Rise of the Novel; Romanticism; and the Victorian Period. The student will identify and contextualize the principal characteristics of each of these movements/developments by reading representative texts. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the major literary trends of the 18th and 19th century, from Restoration comedy and satires through Victorian poetry and prose; outline the major developments in philosophical thought during the Enlightenment and identify these strains of thought in works like Voltarie's Candide; identify the factors that led to the rise of the novel as a literary form; identify the specific traits that characterize early sentimental, Gothic, and picaresque novel; describe the political factors that led to the popularity of Romanticism; describe the shift in thought that led to the split between Romanticism and Enlightenment; identify the themes, conventions, and tropes of Romantic poetry; define and explain the significance of the term/concept of ĺÎĺĺĺŤthe Romantic imagination; define the political, social, and economic factors that led to the surge in popular Victorian fiction; explain the significance of poetic experimentation in the 19th century works of writers like Tennyson, Hopkins, and Browning. (English Literature 203)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
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Lecture Notes
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Syllabus
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The Saylor Foundation
History of Europe, 1800 to the Present
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This course will introduce the student to the history of Europe from ...

This course will introduce the student to the history of Europe from 1800 to present day. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Europe during this period including Industrial Revolution, the First and Second World Wars, imperialism, and the Cold War. By the end of this course, the student will understand how nationalism, industrialization, and imperialism fueled the rise of European nation-states in the nineteenth century, as well as how world war and oppressive regimes devastated Europe during the 1900s. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Think critically and analytically about European history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; Identify and analyze the varying causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution in Europe; Identify, describe, and analyze the development of a coherent set of ideologies in post-Napoleonic Europe: liberalism, socialism, Marxism, nationalism, and Romanticism; Identify and describe the causes and effects of the era of reform and revolution in Europe in the 1820s and 1830s, as well as analyze the Revolutions of 1848; Describe and analyze the effects of urbanizationĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜexpanding cities, rising public health risks, redefined social classes, the evolving nature of the family, and new developments in science and thought; Identify the age of nationalism in Europe between 1850 and 1914. Students will analyze FranceĺÎĺĺÎĺs Second Empire, ItalyĺÎĺĺÎĺs unification, GermanyĺÎĺĺÎĺs unification, and the modernization of Russia. Students will also be able to define the emergence of the modern nation-state during this period; Identify the causes and characteristics of EuropeĺÎĺĺÎĺs ĺÎĺĺĺŤNew ImperialismĄ_ĺĺö of the late nineteenth century. Students will also be able to describe and analyze responses to this imperialism in Africa, India, the Middle East, and the Far East; Assess how and why World War I erupted in 1914. Students will also be able to identify and describe the characteristics and impact of the Great War; Identify and describe the Russian Revolution of 1917, including the fall of the Romanov dynasty and the Bolshevik Revolution; Identify and describe the cultural and social problems that characterized post-WWI Europe. Students will be able to analyze Modernism, ethnic and economic problems in central and eastern Europe, and the Great Depression; Identify and describe the rise of authoritarian regimes in Europe during the 1920s and 1930s. Students will be able to analyze Stalinism, Fascism, and Nazism; Identify and describe the causes and conflicts of World War II. Students will also be able to analyze, identify, and describe the Holocaust; Analyze and explain the Cold War. Students will also be able to analyze, identify, and describe the collapse of Communism and the Soviet Union, as well as the end of the Cold War; Identify and describe the post-WWII social transformations in Europe, including the rise of feminism, the rise of counterculture, and new developments in both science and technology; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, using historical research methods. (History 202)

Subject:
World Cultures
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Lecture Notes
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The Saylor Foundation
History of Africa to 1890
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This course introduces the history of Africa from 300,000 BCE to the ...

This course introduces the history of Africa from 300,000 BCE to the era of European imperialism in the nineteenth century. The story continues in HIST 252, which covers the last 120 years of African history. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: locate major regions, geographic features, and populations in Africa and label them on a map; identify major events and trends in the history of Africa prior to 1890 that describe change over time; demonstrate the impact of the African environment on human history in Africa and explain how humans in turn changed that environment; compare and contrast the diverse social and political structures and systems devised by Africans; summarize the connections between Africans and other peoples of the world and the ways in which those connections changed over time; demonstrate the usefulness, best practices, and limitations of different types of sources for understanding the African past; appraise various conceptions of the African past given the evidence from that past; assess the degree to which there can be said to be one, shared African history before 1890. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 251)

Subject:
World History
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Reading
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Textbook
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The Saylor Foundation
20th Century Art
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Examination of the cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in ...

Examination of the cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in Europe and the United States, surveying the artwork of Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Pop Art, and Op-Art, and Modern and Postmodern architecture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
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Full Course
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Reading
Syllabus
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The Saylor Foundation
Principles of Management (Business 208)
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This course will illustrate the ways in which the practice of management ...

This course will illustrate the ways in which the practice of management evolves as firms grow in size. Historically, middle managers have served as so-called ŇgatekeepersÓ who collect, analyze, and pass information up and down the management chain within an organization. But two recent developments at the turn of the 21st century Đ namely, low-cost data manipulation in computers and the emergence of widespread, real-time communication (in the forms of inexpensive, long-distance global calling, email, text messaging, and social media) Đ have reduced the need for these middle-manager gatekeepers, and companies have eliminated thousands of such positions. The goal? To speed the flow of information and decision-making and reduce the number of layers that separate the customer from the leadership of an organization.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Management
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The Saylor Foundation
Organizational Behavior (Business 209)
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This course will cover five major OB areas including managing individuals, managing ...

This course will cover five major OB areas including managing individuals, managing groups, power and politics, conflict management, and organizational change. Before delving into more rigorous content, it is important to understand what an organization is and the history of organizational behavior as a discipline. In taking this into consideration, this course will begin with a look at the basics of an organization.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Management
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation