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7th Grade Global Inequalities Social Studies Standards at a Glance Template 6-12
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Unit plan for 7th grade Global Studies surrounding the topic of inequalities.
Compelling questions:
Why do inequalities exist around the world?
How do we impact change?

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Deb Brix
Jackie Konz
Toni Bounds
Date Added:
05/14/2019
Attitudes about Racial Discrimination and Racial Inequality in the US: A Data-Driven Learning Guide
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The goal of this module is to explore White and Black Americans' attitudes about racial discrimination and racial inequality. Crosstabulation will be used.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
TeachingWithData.org
Provider Set:
TeachingWithData.org
Author:
ICPSR
Date Added:
11/07/2014
Big Questions For The Future Lecture Series
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This series looks at the Oxford Martin School's academics and how their research is making a difference to our global future. The series will be of interest to people who are concerned about the future for the planet, how civilisation will adapt to emerging problems and issues such as climate change, over population, increased urbanisation of populations and the creation of vaccines to fight against future pandemics. The Oxford Martin School academics explain their various research topics in an accessible and thoughtful way and try to find practical solutions to these issues.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Colin Goding|Ian Goldin|Adrian Hill|Angela McClean|Katherine Willis|Robyn Norton|Sonia Contera|Pedro Ferreira|Steve Rayner
Date Added:
08/20/2012
Building Inclusive Cities: Tackling Urban Inequality and Segregation
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Urban design, inequality and segregation are strongly connected.

Cities around the world, from the Global South to the Global North, are facing a rise in inequality and socio-economic segregation. The wealthy are increasingly concentrating in the most attractive urban areas and poverty is spreading to the suburbs. Rising levels of segregation have major consequences for the social sustainability of cities and leads to unequal life opportunities depending on where in the city you live.

In this course, aimed at a broad range of professionals, from urban planners and architects to geographers, you will learn what the main drivers and indicators of urban inequality and segregation are, using examples from cities from all over the world. You will learn how segregation is measured, how to interpret the results of the analyses of segregation and how to relate these insights to urban design. With this knowledge, you will be able to analyze how these issues may be affecting your local environment.

Additionally, we will present some historical examples of how urban design has played a role shaping spatial inequality and segregation in a selection of case study cities. This will help you to get a better understanding of how urban design can reduce spatial inequality and segregation.

The course is taught by the editors of the new SpringerOpen book “Urban socio-economic segregation and income inequality. A global perspective” and senior experts from the Urban Design section of TU Delft, which is ranked number 2 in the QS World University Rankings in the field of Architecture.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
Leo van den Burg
Maarten van Ham
Tanja Herdt
Date Added:
01/17/2023
Can We End Poverty Overnight?
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Americans make up around four percent of the world population and yet they control over 25% of the world’s wealth. If that wealth were shared evenly across the globe, couldn’t we solve the problem of global poverty overnight? In this video, Professor Matt Zwolinski of the University of San Diego explores how best to end poverty for good.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Matt Zwolinski
Date Added:
08/19/2015
EconGuy Videos: Do the Rich Pay Too Much in Taxes?
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We keep hearing that the wealthy pay a disproportionate share of our taxes. Do the rich pay too much tax? We can't answer that question without looking at how income is distributed. It turns out that tax payments are unequal because income is unequal. Even if we taxed everyone at exactly the same rate, the rich would still have huge tax payments - because they're the ones making the most income.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Saint Michael's College
Provider Set:
EconGuy Videos
Author:
Patrick Walsh
Date Added:
11/29/2013
Economics Made Easy: Curricular Resources for Economics Courses
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Looking for engaging content for your economics courses? The Institute for Humane Studies has curated this collection of educational resources to help economics professors enrich their curriculum. Find videos, interactive games, reading lists, and more on everything from opportunity costs to trade policy. This collection is updated frequently with new content, so watch this space!

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Institute for Humane Studies
Date Added:
04/13/2018
The Economy
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The Economy is a course in economics. Throughout, we start with a question or a problem about the economy—why the advent of capitalism is associated with a sharp increase in average living standards, for example—and then teach the tools of economics that contribute to an answer.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
The CORE Project
Date Added:
09/15/2017
Five Inequality Myths
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Many people are concerned with growing income inequality, but according to Professor Antony Davies of Duquesne University, there are a lot of misconceptions about inequality. In this lecture, Professor Davies explores five common myths about inequality, covering topics like profit, types of equality, and the standard of living.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Antony Davies
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Global Inequality Lab 1
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These materials include background for the instructor and a lab that engages student in an analysis of global inequality while learning and using the R language (a programming language for statistics). Students obtain data on the US and two other countries (one more developed and one less developed).

Subject:
Computer Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture Notes
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Elin Waring
Janet Michello
Date Added:
05/31/2019
Global Inequality Lab 2
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These materials include background for the instructor and a lab that engages student in an analysis of global inequality while learning and using the R language (a programming language for statistics). Students ultimately write a function to access country level data from the CIA World Factbook.

Subject:
Computer Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture Notes
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Lehman College
Author:
Elin Waring
Janet Michello
Michello Janet
Waring Elin
Date Added:
05/31/2019
Global Women's Issues: Women in the World Today, extended version
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Global Women’s Issues and the Beijing Platform for Action. This book is based on the 12 critical areas of concern identified at the Beijing Conference: 1 The persistent and increasing burden of poverty on women 2 Inequalities and inadequacies in and unequal access to education and training 3 Inequalities and inadequacies in and unequal access to health care and related services 4 Violence against women 5 The effects of armed or other kinds of conflict on women, including those living under foreign occupation 6 Inequality in economic structures and policies, in all forms of productive activities and in access to resources 7 Inequality between men and women in the sharing of power and decision- making at all levels 8 Insufficient mechanisms at all levels to promote the advancement of women 9 Lack of respect for and inadequate promotion and protection of the human rights of women 10 Stereotyping of women and inequality in women’s access to and participation in all communication systems, especially in the media 11 Gender inequalities in the management of natural resources and in the safeguarding of the environment 12 Persistent discrimination against and violation of the rights of the girl child

Subject:
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Faculty Reviewed Open Textbooks
Author:
United States Department of State Bureau of International Information Programs
Date Added:
12/15/2014
Health Disparities
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Educational Use
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This lesson explores the concept of health disparities for socially disadvantaged groups (e.g., youth of color and LGBT youth). Students are encouraged to examine the causes and impact of these disparities and to create possible solutions for overcoming them.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
12/02/2016
Income Inequality and the Effects of Globalization
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Income inequality in America is a serious issue. People are worried about a widening gap between the rich and the poor in the United States. But is the global story the same? In this video, Professor Tyler Cowen of George Mason University explains how globalization is affecting income inequality worldwide.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Tyler Cowen
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Is There Too Much Inequality in America?: A Debate
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The question of income inequality has become a key issue in contemporary politics. What caused the distribution of wealth in America to become so lopsided in favor of the 1%? What are the best ways to even the playing field? How can society best help its poorest? Does inequality even matter? The Institute for Humane Studies asked two professors-- Professor Steve Horwitz, economist at St. Lawrence University, and Professor Jeffrey Reiman, philosopher at American University- to answer questions about wealth, fairness, inequality in the United States. This is their debate.

Subject:
Philosophy
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Jeffrey Reiman
Steve Horwitz
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Mapping Inequality
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Mapping Inequality opens the HOLC files at the National Archives to scholars, students, and residents and policy leaders in local communities. This site makes the well-known security maps of HOLC available in digital form, as well as the data and textual assessments of the area descriptions that were created to go with the maps. By bringing study of HOLC into the digital realm, Mapping Inequality embraces a big data approach that can simultaneously give a national view of the program or a neighborhood-level assessment of the 1930s real estate rescue. Project researchers are providing access to some of the digital tools and interactive resources they are using in their own research, in the hope that the public will be able to understand the effects of federal housing policy and local implementation in their own communities.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Higher Education
U.S. History
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Interactive
Author:
Digital Scholarship Lab
University of Richmond
Date Added:
10/27/2019
Math, Grade 6, Equations and Inequalities
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Equations and Inequalities

Type of Unit: Concept

Prior Knowledge

Students should be able to:

Add, subtract, multiply, and divide with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals.
Use the symbols <, >, and =.
Evaluate expressions for specific values of their variables.
Identify when two expressions are equivalent.
Simplify expressions using the distributive property and by combining like terms.
Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world problems.
Order rational numbers.
Represent rational numbers on a number line.

Lesson Flow

In the exploratory lesson, students use a balance scale to find a counterfeit coin that weighs less than the genuine coins. Then continuing with a balance scale, students write mathematical equations and inequalities, identify numbers that are, or are not, solutions to an equation or an inequality, and learn how to use the addition and multiplication properties of equality to solve equations. Students then learn how to use equations to solve word problems, including word problems that can be solved by writing a proportion. Finally, students connect inequalities and their graphs to real-world situations.

Subject:
Mathematics
Algebra
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
Math, Grade 6, Equations and Inequalities, Balance Scale As A Mathematical Model
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Lesson OverviewStudents solve a classic puzzle about finding a counterfeit coin. The puzzle introduces students to the idea of a scale being balanced when the weight of the objects on both sides is the same and the scale being unbalanced when the objects on one side do not weigh the same as the objects on the other side.Key ConceptsThe concept of an inequality statement can be modeled using an unbalanced scale. The context—weighing a set of coins in order to identify the one coin that weighs less than the others—allows students to manipulate the weight on either side of the scale. In doing so, they are focused on the relationship between two weights—two quantities—and whether or not they are equal.Goals and Learning ObjectivesExplore a balance scale as a model for an equation or an inequality.Introduce formal meanings of equality and inequality.

Subject:
Numbers and Operations
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 6, Equations and Inequalities, Inequality Statements Including Variables
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Lesson OverviewStudents represent real-world situations using inequality statements that include a variable.Key ConceptsInequality statements tell you whether values in a situation are greater than or less than a given number and also tell you whether values in the situation can be equal to that number or not.The symbols < and > tell you that the unknown value(s) in a situation cannot be equal to a given number: the unknown value(s) are strictly greater than or less than the number. The inequality x < y means x must be less than y. The inequality x > y means x must be greater than y.The symbols ≤  and ≥ tell you that the unknown value(s) in a situation can also be equal to a given number: the unknown value(s) are less than or equal to, or greater than or equal to, the number. The inequality x ≤ y means x is less than or equal to y. The inequality x ≥ y means x is greater than or equal to y.Goals and Learning ObjectivesUnderstand the inequality symbols <, >, ≤, and ≥.Write inequality statements for real-world situations.ELL: When writing the summary, provide ELLs access to a dictionary and give them time to discuss their summary with a partner before writing, to help them organize their thoughts. Allow ELLs who share the same primary language to discuss in their native language if they wish.

Subject:
Numbers and Operations
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015