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Accepting Size Differences
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There is no doubt that modern lifestyle changes have contributed to the problems of overweight and obesity among adults and children. Some school health and physical education programs are tackling the challenge of integrating healthier eating and regular exercise into the lives of students. But what about the social challenges that face children who are overweight? And how do media messages reinforce the bias they already experience among many of their peers? In these lessons, students will evaluate both their own biases related to size differences and the ways in which media shape those biases.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
12/02/2016
Advanced Analytic Methods in Geospatial Intelligence
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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General James Clapper, former United States Director of National Intelligence and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), once said \everything happens somewhere.\" He stressed that there are aspects of time and place to every intelligence problem. In this course, you will examine how time and place work with general intelligence techniques to create geospatial intelligence. You will learn and apply critical thinking skills, structured analytical techniques, and other intelligence methods in a geospatial context. You'll also learn how to reduce personal and organizational bias by conducting an Analysis of Competing Hypotheses, by R. Heuer, a 45-year veteran of the CIA. As a result, you will be better prepared for the world of geospatial intelligence analysis."

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http
Penn State University
Provider Set:
// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Dennis Bellafiore
Todd Bacastow
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Behavioral Economics and Finance, Spring 2004
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Surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Prospect theory. Biases in probabilistic judgment. Self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings. Fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions. Financial market anomalies and theories. Impact of markets, learning, and incentives. Some evidence on memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subject:
Finance
Economics
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gabaix, Xavier
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Bias
Rating

Systematic error, or 'bias' is of particular importance in any epidemiological investigation, and should be avoided wherever possible. Biases will reduce the validity of any results obtained, whether it be by overestimating or underestimating the frequency of disease in a population or the association between an exposure and disease. The forms of bias covered here can only be minimised through careful study design and execution - they cannot be accounted for in the analysis. Although confounding is considered by many authors as a form of bias, it can be accounted for during analysis, and so is covered separately.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
WikiVet
Provider Set:
Veterinary Epidemiology
Date Added:
02/27/2015
Bias Correction of NWP Model Data
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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The lesson "Bias Correction of NWP Model Data" first describes what affects bias in NWP models: regime continuity, timing of features that affect sensible weather, and existence (or not) of those features in the models. After discussing examples of each of these, three bias correction methods are presented: Model Output Statistics (MOS), decaying average, and a SmartInit tool developed at the Boise ID WFO called BOIVerify. Situations where each perform well and each perform poorly are discussed. Finally, after a comprehensive review question and feedback, a summary and series of points to remember are presented. Optional materials on downloading bias correction data files from NCEP and on the model climate used to calculate anomalies for the North American Ensemble Prediction System are also available.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
COMET MetEd Collection
Author:
COMET
Date Added:
06/22/2010
Civil rights march on Washington, D.C.
Rating

Photograph shows a procession of African Americans carrying signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing, and an end to bias.  Students will list their observations, make inferences, and devise questions while working in small cooperative learning groups using the LOC Primary Source Analysis Tool.  Special attention should be drawn to the vocabulary (integrated, bias, and equal rights) words on the signs.  Were African Americans truly free?  What bound them?  How does "separate but equal" play here?  Does equal mean the same thing for everyone?  How did perspectives impact society at this time?

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Date Added:
09/15/2017
Confounding
Rating

The issue of confounding is of central importance in any analytic epidemiological study (as well as in those descriptive studies aiming to compare different populations), especially in the case of observational studies. Confounding results from non-random differences between the groups of animals being compared in relation to a second, 'confounding' exposure which is independently associated with both the exposure of interest (although not a consequence of this) and the outcome of interest (although not an effect of this). This results in the effect of the exposure of interest is 'mixed up' with the effect of the confounding exposure, and therefore an incorrect estimate of the true association. As such, confounding is viewed by many authors as a form of bias - however, unlike forms of selection and information bias, it is a natural feature of the data (in the case of an observational study), and techniques are available to account for it during analysis.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
WikiVet
Provider Set:
Veterinary Epidemiology
Date Added:
02/27/2015
Differences Across the Curriculum: Part 1
Conditions of Use:
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This set of lessons can be used with "Differences Across the Curriculum: Parts 2, 3, and 4" as an integrated approach to exploring diversity with eighth graders. The unit will revolve around the use of the drama version of "The Diary of Anne Frank." Students will learn how diversity creates bias which leads to conflict, where students confront their bias and practice tolerance. These parts reflect the four core curricula in an interwoven approach to teaching students to confront their biases, learn tolerance, and infer the impact of these on today's society. This activity, Part 1, is meant to serve as a pre-reading activity to the reading of the play form of "The Diary of Anne Frank." See attachment created on Inspiration software to gain insight to the organization of the entire unit.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Lynn Carter
Date Added:
06/20/2000
Differences Across the Curriculum: Part 2
Conditions of Use:
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This set of lessons can be used with "Differences Across the Curriculum: Parts 1, 3, and 4" as an integrated approach to exploring diversity with eighth graders. The unit will revolve around the use of the drama version of "The Diary of Anne Frank." Students will learn how diversity creates bias, which leads to conflict, where students confront their bias and practice tolerance. These parts reflect the four core curricula in an interwoven approach to teaching students to confront their biases, learn tolerance, and infer the impact of these on today's society. This activity, Part 2, is meant to augment the pre-reading activities completed in Part 1 in a Social Sciences class.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Lynn Carter
Date Added:
06/20/2000
English Language Arts, Grade 11
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Project: Growing Up Digital
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In this unit, students will produce two major pieces of work.  The first piece is an argument essay that grapples with one of the core questions of the unit: who are we, and who have we become because of the ways we connect? Students will read, annotate, and discuss several texts together as they consider the issues surrounding this question, and they will also research and annotate independently as they search for more evidence and perspectives to help deepen their ideas.  They will also create a museum exhibit as part of a team.  The exhibit project will help students identify what's worth preserving about their unique place in history.

PROJECT UNITS

This project unit continues to meet the English Language Arts standards as it also utilizes the learning principles established by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. It is designed to support deep content knowledge and perseverance through long-term project planning and implementation. In addition, it will help students to recognize, develop, and apply the planning, teamwork, communication, and presentation skills they will use while presenting a final product to their class and/or the greater community. This real-world project-based activity will give students an opportunity to apply the skills they have been learning all year and will guide them to develop the motivation, knowledge, and skills they need in order to be college and career ready.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students write an argument paper where they develop a claim about current culture as it has been influenced by digital connectivity.
Students participate in a group project to create a museum exhibit that captures a unique place, time, and relationship to technology. Students acknowledge the differing perspectives of each group member and use those perspectives to synthesize one cohesive visual argument together.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What does it mean to be digitally connected?
What are the implications of living in a world where everyone is digitally connected?
How does the availability of instant connectivity shape our relationships?
What does our Internet use reveal about people's needs as humans?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Project: Growing Up Digital, The Effect of Digital Connectivity, Research On Information & Interaction
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In this lesson, you will consider the ways that ubiquitous computing has changed how we interact with information and how it has changed how we think about knowledge. You'll also have an opportunity to research independently.In this lesson, students will consider the ways that ubiquitous computing has changed how we interact with information and how it has changed how we think about knowledge. They'll also have an opportunity to research independently.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
An Exploration of Data & Bias
Rating

This unit will explore the concepts of bias and confirmation bias and how they affect people's presentation and interpretation of data. It includes 5 days of lessons and independent work that culminate in students being able to show what bias and confirmation bias are and how they affect the way we interpret data.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Rachel Bartlett
Angie Miller
Date Added:
06/22/2017
Fake News: Bias in the Media
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The media plays an important role in how you interpret current events. The news media can use particular wording to sway public opinion. This seminar will help you build necessary skills to analyze and understand the media you consume to help you make informed decisions.StandardsCC.8.5.9-10.F: Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.CC.8.5.9-10.I Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.CC.1.2.11-12.D Evaluate how an author’s point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.CC.1.2.11-12.F Evaluate how words and phrases shape meaning and tone in texts.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
False, Misleading, Clickbait-y, and/or Satirical “News” Sources
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This is a list of fake, false, or regularly misleading websites that are shared on Facebook and social media. Some of these websites may rely on “outrage” by using distorted headlines and decontextualized or dubious information in order to generate likes, shares, and profits. These websites are categorized with the number 1 next to them. Some websites on this list may circulate misleading and/or potentially unreliable information, and they are marked with a 2. Other websites on this list sometimes use clickbait-y headlines and social media descriptions, and they are marked with a 3. Other sources on this list are purposefully fake with the intent of satire/comedy, which can offer important critical commentary on politics and society, but have the potential to be shared as actual/literal news. They are marked with a 4.

Subject:
Communication
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Melissa Zimdars
Date Added:
11/15/2016
THE HUMAN TERRAIN SYSTEM: Operationally Relevant Social Science Research in Iraq and Afghanistan
Rating

The Human Terrain System is now a defunct initiative that had been created as early as the 1970s. The concept was that anthropologists would be useful to military troops trying to understand the cultural framework within the country that the troops were assigned to. The anthropologist would be embedded within a specific branch of the service, usually the US Army, to assess, evaluate and create relationships with local peoples. The result of this initiative were poor for a variety of reasons, not the least of which was the death of several anthropologists within war zones.

Subject:
Languages
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Communication
Public Relations
U.S. History
General Law
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson
Primary Source
Author:
Jay B Winchester (Judge Advocate
PhD Janet Harris (Director
US Army Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs)
US Army Medical Research and Material Command)
Date Added:
09/06/2018
How Trustworthy is the internet?
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  Students will spend 3-5 days learning about bias. They must figure out what bias is and how to spot bias in an online article. For the final product students will be asked to create a product that their peers can use to identify bias.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
06/08/2018
I’m Not Biased, Am I? Understanding Implicit Bias
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Bias is a universal human condition. It is not a personal defect, but it is important to recognize your biases and manage them. We cannot cure unconscious bias, but we can address it. This lesson will provide you the opportunity to identify your personal biases. You have them, even if you think you don’t! You are encouraged to try this lesson so you can be more aware of your personal biases and take the necessary steps to reduce their impact on your life.StandardsCC.8.5.11-12.G Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
01/02/2018
Introduction to Climate Models
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This module explains how climate models work. Because the modeling of both weather and climate share many similarities, the content throughout this module draws frequent comparisons and highlights the differences. We explain not only how, but why climate models differ from weather models. To do so, we explore the difference between weather and climate, then show how models are built to simulate climate and generate the statistics that describe it. We conclude with a discussion of models are tuned and tested. Understanding how climate responds to changes in atmospheric composition and other factors drives climate research. Climate models provide a tool to understand how processes work and interact with each other. Our intended audience is the weather forecasting community: those who are already familiar with NWP models. Non-forecasters with an interest in weather and climate should also find the module useful. The content is not overly technical and the goal of this module is not to train people to develop climate models but to highlight the similarities and differences between weather and climate models.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
COMET MetEd Collection
Author:
COMET
Date Added:
09/19/2012
Introduction to Verification of Hydrologic Forecasts
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This module offers a comprehensive description of a set of common verification measures for hydrologic forecasts, both deterministic and probabilistic. Through use of rich illustrations, animations, and interactions, this module explains how these verification measures can provide valuable information to users with varying needs. In addition to providing a measure of how well a forecast matches observations, verification measures can be used to help forecasters and users learn about the strengths and weaknesses of a forecast.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
COMET MetEd Collection
Author:
COMET
Date Added:
06/30/2008