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Use of World Health Organization and CDC Growth Charts for Children Aged 0--59 Months in the United States
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In April 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO) released new international growth ...

In April 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO) released new international growth charts for children aged 0--59 months. Similar to the 2000 CDC growth charts, these charts describe weight for age, length (or stature) for age, weight for length (or stature), and body mass index for age. Whereas the WHO charts are growth standards, describing the growth of healthy children in optimal conditions, the CDC charts are a growth reference, describing how certain children grew in a particular place and time. However, in practice, clinicians use growth charts as standards rather than references.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Reading Informational Text
Biology
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
Centers For Disease Control and Prevention
Grade 4 ELA Module 1A
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Module 1A focuses on building community by making connections between visual imagery, ...

Module 1A focuses on building community by making connections between visual imagery, oral accounts, poetry and written texts of various cultures with a focus on the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) culture. Students will determine a central idea and demonstrate how gathering information from a variety of sources can help us understand a central idea more fully.| Module 1 also reinforces reading fluency, close text analysis, explanatory paragraph writing, and presenting to peers. The module reinforces the fact that Native Americans—specifically the Iroquois (Haudenosaunee, People of the Longhouse) —were early inhabitants of the New York region and state, and continue to contribute to the region’s history.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Grade 5 ELA Module 1
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What are human rights, and how do real people and fictional characters ...

What are human rights, and how do real people and fictional characters respond when those rights are challenged? Students will develop their ability to read and understand complex text as they consider this question. Students will begin to build knowledge about human rights through a close read of the introduction and selected articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), paired with short firsthand accounts of people around the world who currently face human rights challenges. In Unit 2, students will do an extended study of Esperanza Rising (740L) by Pam Muñoz Ryan, applying their new learning about human rights as one lens through which to interpret the character and theme in this rich novel—a complex coming-of-age story set in Mexico and rural California during the early 1930s. Through close reading, interpretation, and analysis of fiction and nonfiction texts, students will synthesize their understanding of human rights. The specific literacy focus is on supporting understanding through quoting directly from text, inferring theme, and comparing and contrasting how different texts address the topics and themes of human rights. Students will write an analytical essay in which they describe how a character in the novel responds to challenges. In Unit 3, students will continue to revisit the text and themes of the UDHR and Esperanza Rising as they read, write, and ultimately perform Readers Theater. Students will compare novels and Readers Theater as two forms of narrative writing. They will then select specific articles of the UDHR that relate thematically to the novel and reread key passages of the novel with that theme in mind. They will write individual and small group scripts based on these key passages and on phrases from the UDHR. Students will revise, rehearse, and ultimately perform their group Readers Theater scripts for their class and/or school or community members. 

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Grade 8 ELA Module 1
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In this module, students will develop their ability to read and understand ...

In this module, students will develop their ability to read and understand complex text as they consider the challenges of fictional and real refugees. In the first unit, students will begin Inside Out & Back Again, by Thanhha Lai, analyzing how critical incidents reveal the dynamic nature of the main character, Ha, a 10-year-old Vietnamese girl whose family is deciding whether to flee during the fall of Saigon. The novel, poignantly told in free verse, will challenge students to consider the impact of specific word choice on tone and meaning. Students will build their ability to infer and analyze text, both in discussion and through writing. They then will read informational text to learn more about the history of war in Vietnam, and the specific historical context of Ha’s family’s struggle during the fall of Saigon. In Unit 2, students will build knowledge about refugees’ search for a place to call home. They will read informational texts that convey universal themes of refugees’

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
People of the Whale: Grades K-1: Electronic Book
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This informational text explores how the Inupiat of Alaska's northwest have adapted ...

This informational text explores how the Inupiat of Alaska's northwest have adapted to changing climate conditions throughout the past and present. The changes impact how close to the ocean they live and how easily they can hunt bowhead whales to maintain their lifestyle. The text is written at a kindergarten through grade one reading level. This is an onscreen version that contains recorded narration allowing students to listen to the text as they read along. Highlighted vocabulary words have individually recorded definitions heard by clicking on the links.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
Jessica Fries-Gaither
Grade 6 ELA Module 1
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In this module, students are involved in a deep study of mythology, ...

In this module, students are involved in a deep study of mythology, its purposes, and elements. Students will read Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief (780L), a high-interest novel about a sixth-grade boy on a hero’s journey. Some students may be familiar with this popular fantasy book; in this module, students will read with a focus on the archetypal journey and close reading of the many mythical allusions. As they begin the novel, students also will read a complex informational text that explains the archetypal storyline of the hero’s journey which has been repeated in literature throughout the centuries. Through the close reading of literary and informational texts, students will learn multiple strategies for acquiring and using academic vocabulary. Students will also build routines and expectations of discussion as they work in small groups. At the end of Unit 1, having read half of the novel, students will explain, with text-based evidence, how Percy is an archetypal hero. In Unit 2, students will continue reading The Lightning Thief (more independently): in class, they will focus on the novel’s many allusions to classic myths; those allusions will serve as an entry point into a deeper study of Greek mythology. They also will continue to build their informational reading skills through the close reading of texts about the close reading of texts about the elements of myths. This will create a conceptual framework to support students’ reading of mythology. As a whole class, students will closely read several complex Greek myths. They then will work in small groups to build expertise on one of those myths. In Unit 3, students shift their focus to narrative writing skills. This series of writing lessons will scaffold students to their final performance task in which they will apply their knowledge about the hero’s journey and the elements of mythology to create their own hero’s journey stories.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
English 10 Q1
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In English 10, we will study and explore poetry, narratives, short stories, ...

In English 10, we will study and explore poetry, narratives, short stories, novels, non-fiction essays, articles and informational texts. Our comprehension of these texts will be facilitated by analyzing and evaluating the literary elements, plot, character development and themes of each work. As part of this course, we will continue to develop writing skills by experimenting with multiple forms of writing. We will clarify thinking and writing by improving our ability to support opinions, providing expressive details and using the writing process as a means to strengthen ideas. This course will provide ample opportunities for students to imaginatively and critically express themselves through multi-media resources as they make essential connections to the world, themselves and literature.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Mountain Heights Academy
Author:
Individual Authors
CC Tasks: My Report About Frogs (Grade 1)
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Common Core Task Description: This task asks students to write an informative ...

Common Core Task Description: This task asks students to write an informative text and use information/facts to write a report about what was learned. This 3-4 week unit leads students in an exploration of informational texts. Read alouds and structured conversations are used to guide students in the process of using an informational text as a learning tool (i.e., gathering facts from what an author has written). Students then use what they have learned from a mentor text to create their own teaching text. Extensions for continued learning around frogs are included.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
New York City Department of Education
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Unit 1
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In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision ...

In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision of the American Dream as put together by our Founding Fathers. They will be asked: How, if at all, has this dream changed? Is this dream your dream? First students will participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing for his or her vision of the American Dream, and then they will write an argument laying out and defending their personal view of what the American Dream should be.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate closely one of the documents that they feel expresses the American Dream.
Students participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing his or her vision of the American Dream.
Students write a paper, taking into consideration the different points of view in the documents read, answering the question “What is the American Dream now?”
Students write their own argument describing and defending their vision of what the American Dream should be.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What has been the historical vision of the American Dream?
What should the American Dream be? (What should we as individuals and as a nation aspire to?)
How would women, former slaves, and other disenfranchised groups living during the time these documents were written respond to them?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Unit 1
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In our lives, we are constantly telling stories to ourselves and to ...

In our lives, we are constantly telling stories to ourselves and to others in an attempt to both understand our experiences and present our best selves to others.  But how do we tell a story about ourselves that is both true and positive? How do we hold ourselves up in the best possible light, while still being honest about our struggles and our flaws? Students will explore ways of interpreting and portraying personal experiences.  They'll read Chinua Achebe's novel Things Fall Apart , analyzing the text through the eyes of one character. They'll get to know that character's flaws and strengths, and they'll tell part of the story from that character's perspective, doing their best to tell an honest tale that presents their character's best side. Then they'll explore their own stories, crafting a personal narrative about an important moment of learning in his or her life.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and analyze Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart , viewing the events and conflicts of the novel through the eyes of one of the central characters.
Students write a two-part narrative project: one narrative told through their character’s perspective and one personal narrative about an incident in their own life.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How do our conflicts shape and show our character?
How can we tell a story about ourselves that’s both honest and positive?
How do definitions of justice change depending on the culture you live in?
What are ways individuals can react to a changing world? To a community that doesn’t accept us?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English 12 Q1
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ĺĐTo be or not to be?ĺÓ Is it the ĺĐbest of timesĺÓ ...

ĺĐTo be or not to be?ĺÓ Is it the ĺĐbest of timesĺÓ or the ĺĐworst of timesĺÓ? Explore these famous questions and more in English 12. This course focuses on British literature in all of its genres: drama, poetry, the novel, short story, and nonfiction literary and informational texts. Students will also apply timeless conversations to our modern world through scholarly research and writing about current issues. Critical reading, analysis, writing, and speaking will cover the core curriculum requirements. In addition to mastering the standard core, our students will employ the latest technological tools to communicate and collaborate, and create professional, creative projects. Emphasis will be placed on skills that will be critical to a successful transition to college and beyond. This is the first of a four-quarter course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
Mountain Heights Academy
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Unit 6, Episode 1, Lesson 4
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Over the next two lessons, you will complete the culminating assessment for ...

Over the next two lessons, you will complete the culminating assessment for this unit. You'll read text and answer questions that will reflect your reading comprehension.

Over the next two lessons, students will complete the culminating assessment for this unit.

In this lesson, students will read text and answer questions that reflect their reading comprehension. Some questions will ask students to select from a group of answers supplied. Other questions will ask students to construct their own answers and write them in the space provided.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Provider:
Pearson
Grade 11 ELA Module 1
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In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze literary and nonfiction texts ...

In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze literary and nonfiction texts focusing on how central ideas develop and interact within a text. Students also explore the impact of authors’ choices regarding how to develop and relate elements within a text.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Grade 7 ELA Module 1
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In this 8 eight-week module, students explore the experiences of people of ...

In this 8 eight-week module, students explore the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War. They build proficiency in using textual evidence to support ideas in their writing, both in shorter responses and in an extended essay. In Unit 1, students begin the novel A Long Walk to Water (720L) by Linda Sue Park. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to analyze and contrast the points of view of the two central characters, Salva and Nya. They also will read informational text to gather evidence on the perspectives of the Dinka and Nuer tribes of Southern Sudan. In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the commonalities between Salva and Nya in relation to the novel’s theme: how individuals survive in challenging environments. (The main characters’ journeys are fraught with challenges imposed by the environment, including the lack of safe drinking water, threats posed by animals, and the constant scarcity of food. They are also challenged by political and social environments.). As in Unit 1, students will read this literature closely alongside complex informational texts (focusing on background on Sudan and factual accounts of the experiences of refugees from the Second Sudanese Civil War). Unit 2 culminates with a literary analysis essay about the theme of survival. Unit 3 brings students back to a deep exploration of character and point of view: students will combine their research about Sudan with specific quotes from A Long Walk to Water as they craft a two-voice poem, comparing and contrasting the points of view of the two main characters, Salva and Nya,. The two-voice poem gives students an opportunity to use both their analysis of the characters and theme in the novel and their research about the experiences of the people of Southern Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War. 

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Reading Like a Historian, Unit 1: Introduction
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Read the Fine Print
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The Reading Like a Historian curriculum turns students into historical investigators. Students ...

The Reading Like a Historian curriculum turns students into historical investigators. Students may find this change jarring after a steady diet of reading a textbook and answering questions. The three lessons in the Introduction--Lunchroom Fight, Evaluating Sources, and Snapshot Autobiography--help students recognize skills of historical inquiry they already practice everyday, such as reconciling conflicting claims and evaluating the reliability of narrative accounts. The challenge is to apply these skills while reading. Reading Like a Historian classroom posters remind students what questions they should be asking as they read historical documents.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Provider Set:
Reading Like a Historian
Collaborative Stories 1: Prewriting and Drafting
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Students hone their teamwork skills and play off each other's writing strengths ...

Students hone their teamwork skills and play off each other's writing strengths as they participate in prewriting activities for a story to be written collaboratively by the whole class.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Grade 10 ELA Module 1
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In Module 10.1, students engage with literature and nonfiction texts and explore ...

In Module 10.1, students engage with literature and nonfiction texts and explore how complex characters develop through their interactions with each other, and how these interactions develop central ideas such as parental and communal expectations, self-perception and performance, and competition and learning from mistakes.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY