Search Results (1641)

View
Selected filters:
  • Primary Source
100,000,000 Guinea Pigs : The Dangers of Consumption
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In 1927, responding to the seemingly overpowering claims of advertisers and mass marketers, engineer Frederick Schlink and economist Stuart Chase published Your Money's Worth, which argued for an "extension of the principle of buying goods according to impartial scientific tests rather than according to the fanfare and triumphs of higher salesmanship." Your Money's Worth became an instant best-seller, and the authors organized Consumers' Research, a testing bureau that provided information and published product tests in a new magazine, Consumers' Research Bulletin. The 1929 stock market crash heightened suspicion of consumer capitalism, and the magazine had 42,000 subscribers by 1932. In 1933, Schlink and Arthur Kallet (executive secretary of Consumers' Research) published 100,000,000 Guinea Pigs: Dangers in Everyday Foods, Drugs, and Cosmetics. The book struck a responsive chord in depression-era America--it went through thirteen printings in its first six months and became one of the best-selling books of the decade. The book's first chapter ("The Great American Guinea Pig"), gave a flavor of their vigorous arguments.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
American Social History Project / Center for History Media and Learning
Provider Set:
Many Pasts (CHNM/ASHP)
Author:
Center for History and New Media/American Social History Project
"1500 Doomed":  People's Press  Reports on the Gauley Bridge Disaster
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The deadly lung disease silicosis is caused when miners, sandblasters, and foundry and tunnel workers inhale fine particles of silica dust--a mineral found in sand, quartz, and granite. In 1935, approximately 1,500 workers--largely African Americans who had come north to find work--were killed by exposure to silica dust while building a tunnel in Gauley Bridge, West Virginia. Ordinarily, silicosis takes a several years to develop, but these West Virginia tunnel workers were falling ill in a matter of months because of exposure to unusually high concentrations of silica dust. The crisis over silicosis suddenly became a national issue, as seen in this article in the radical newspaper Peoples' Press . In 1936 congressional hearings on the Gauley Bridge disaster, it was revealed that company officials and engineers wore masks to protect themselves when they visited the tunnel, but they failed to provide masks for the tunnelers themselves, even when the workers requested them.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
American Social History Project / Center for History Media and Learning
Provider Set:
Many Pasts (CHNM/ASHP)
Author:
Center for History and New Media/American Social History Project
The 19th Amendment
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

plan on using this image to replicate Cynthia's "human timeline" activity to create a US/VA History review for the 11th grade state standadized test (SOL) using only primary sources from the LOC website. This activity will require students to use their knowledge of understanding primary sources to identifiy events in US history and analyze documents to piece together the material they learned throughout the school year leading up to the state test. This activity also helps students practice analyzing primary sources including charts, graphs, pictures, quotes, etc. which are tested on the state SOL. There are a number of ways to conduct this activity, but here are a few examples:

1) Since there will be a lot of documents (from the conception of America to present day) you could break the images up into time periods or themes and ask students to identify and order them. Then, each group can share their resources.

2) The whole class can work together like we did to identify and order the events (this would require a lot of time and brain power).

3) Introduce a set number of images each class period to add to the timelime--this can be posted around the room continuously over the course of your entire review period.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
2009 Maize Genome Collection
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The authors of the research presented in this special collection used the first description of the B73 maize genome to probe some of the most intriguing questions in genetics and plant biology. Read about maize centromeres, new insights into transposon types and distribution, the abundance of very short FLcDNAs encoding predicted peptides, and many other "genetic jewels" contained herein.

Subject:
Biology
Genetics
Material Type:
Data Set
Primary Source
Provider:
Public Library of Science
Provider Set:
Biology and Life Sciences
20 at Home to 1 in the Trenches
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Poster showing a crowd of workers measuring and outfitting a seated monumental man with uniform and supplies. Title continues: It takes the best co-operative efforts of from six to twenty workers at home to properly equip and maintain one American soldier at the front. [...] With consistent help and encouragement for their wage-earning partners and themselves, from all classes of the people, American industry can and will win this war for human liberty. Breeders of industrial war at home must be eliminated. National co-operation is the slogan to insure victory for Democracy over Autocracy. Issued by the National Industrial Conservation Movement, 30 Church Street, New York City. Copies supplied on request. No. E-7. Title from item.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - World War I Posters
3al Jamal bi wasat Beirut - عالجمل بوسط بيروت - On a Camel in Downtown Beirut
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This funny song by Lebanese singers describes their ride on camels through the center of Beirut. The video shows images of downtown Beirut and how unusual it is for camels to be in a big city in the Arab world.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Individual Authors
Author:
Michelle Keserwany
The 442nd Regimental Combat Team
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Several special fighting forces from the United States, made up of single ethnic groups, made significant contributions during World War II, including the African American Tuskegee Airmen and the Navajo Code Talkers. The 442nd Regimental Combat Team was made up solely of Japanese Americans, some of whom were recruited directly from internment camps. (Some Japanese American men who would later become leaders, such as Senator Daniel Inouye, were members of the 442nd.) The images in this group provide a look at the lives and sacrifices of the men of the 442nd, the most highly decorated American unit in WWII. The photographs in this group were all taken for the government-run War Relocation Authority (WRA) and are meant to portray the proud patriotism of the men and their families. One photo shows three women holding their babies, with photographs of their enlisted husbands. Another is a portrait of an older couple who had five sons in the 442nd. Other photographs reflect the training the soldiers of the 442nd received, their life in the battlefield, and their triumphant homecoming. Other documents in this group show a more personal side of the men of the 442nd. One soldier's photo album depicts his personal experiences as a member of the combat team. A 50-page booklet, The Story of the 442nd Combat Team, compiled by members of the team, has this quote from Franklin D. Roosevelt on the dedication page: "Americanism is a matter of the mind and heart; Americanism is not and never was a matter of race and ancestry." On a more poignant note, oil paintings by Japanese American artist Henry Sugimoto reflect the emotions, pain, and suffering these individuals and their families experienced as a result of the war. In Senninbari (Thousand Stiches), a woman holds a scarf of remembrance as a ghostly Nisei soldier looks down from the sky. And in Send Off Husband at Jerome Camp, an internee family stays behind the camp gates as their soldier father/husband goes off to fight for the United States.

Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
5 Pythagorean Solids
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This OER explores the basic organization of the Pythagorean Solids. It contains both an activity as well as resources for further exploration. It is a product of the OU Academy of the Lynx, developed in conjunction with the Galileo's World Exhibition at the University of Oklahoma.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Primary Source
Student Guide
Author:
Brent Purkaple
Kerry Magruder
5 ways to build lasting self-esteem
Rating

5 simple steps for helping to cultivate good self-esteem, including a great TED talk by Guy Winch.
"TED Videos are not officially licensed with any kind of open licensing. However, TED allows the users to freely view and download the videos without restraint. The website is provided as a public service to promote the spread of good ideas."

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Guy Winch
Nadine Hachach-haram
"80 Rounds in Our Pants Pockets": Orville Quick Remembers Pearl Harbor
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, stunned virtually everyone in the U.S. military: Japan's carrier-launched bombers found Pearl Harbor totally unprepared. In this 1991 interview, conducted by John Terreo for the Montana Historical Society, serviceman Orville Quick, who was assigned to build airfields and was very near Pearl Harbor on December 6, 1941, remembers the attack. He also provided a vivid, and humorous, account of the chaos from a soldier's point of view.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
American Social History Project / Center for History Media and Learning
Provider Set:
Many Pasts (CHNM/ASHP)
Author:
Center for History and New Media/American Social History Project
"The A-Bomb Won't Do What You Think!": An Argument Against Reliance on Nuclear Weapons
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

For four years after the U.S. dropped atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end World War II, America held a monopoly on the production of atomic weapons. During this period, debate centering on the use of nuclear bombs in future wars proliferated among government officials, scientists, religious leaders, and in the popular press. In the following article from Collier's, former Navy lieutenant commander William H. Hessler, using data from the Strategic Bombing Survey, argued that saturation bombing of urban areas during World War II, while devastating for civilians, did not achieve war aims. A future atomic war, therefore, might well destroy cities but fail to stop enemy aggression. Furthermore, with a much higher urban concentration than the Soviet Union, the U.S. had more to lose from atomic warfare. The article, while providing detailed explanations of the bomb's destructive capability, demonstrated the lack of information available regarding the long-term medical and ecological effects of radioactivity. Hessler's prose also evoked both the fascination that gadgetry of atomic warfare held for Americans of the time and the fear many felt about the risks involved in putting this technology to use. On September 24, 1949, one week after publication of this article, news that the Russians had conducted atom bomb tests shocked the nation. The following April, a National Security Council report to President Harry S. Truman advised development of a hydrogen bomb--some 1,000 times more destructive than an atom bomb--and a massive buildup of non-nuclear defenses. The subsequent outbreak of war in Korea in June 1950 justified to many a substantial increase in defense spending.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
American Social History Project / Center for History Media and Learning
Provider Set:
Many Pasts (CHNM/ASHP)
Author:
Center for History and New Media/American Social History Project
ACT UP and the AIDS Crisis
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore AIDS activism during the 1980s. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
A. F. of L. Delegates.
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Faced with stiff business opposition, a conservative political climate, hostile courts, and declining membership, leaders of the American Federeration of Labor (AFL) grew increasingly cautious during the 1920s. Labor radicals viewed AFL leaders as overpaid, self-interested functionaries uninterested in organizing unorganized workers into unions. A cartoon by William Gropper published in the Communist Yiddish newspaper Freiheit (and reprinted in English in the New Masses ) caricatures delegates to a 1926 AFL convention in Atlantic City. Well

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
American Social History Project / Center for History Media and Learning
Provider Set:
Many Pasts (CHNM/ASHP)
Author:
Center for History and New Media/American Social History Project
"AIDS Is an Illness of People of Color": Health Service Organizations Advocate Increased Federal Funding to Prevent AIDS in Minority Communities
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In 1981, the U.S. medical community noticed a significant number of gay men living in urban areas with rare forms of pneumonia, cancer, and lymph disorders. The cluster of ailments was initially dubbed Gay-Related Immune Disease (GRID), but when similar illnesses increased in other groups, the name changed to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The mid-1980s saw a number of advances toward understanding and treating the disease, but no vaccine or cure was forthcoming. Gay advocacy and community-based organizations began providing services and pressuring government to increase funding for finding a cure and helping victims. As two representatives of AIDS health services organizations stated in the following 1987 testimony to Congress, AIDS spread in disproportionately high numbers throughout U.S. minority and disadvantaged communities. They advocated increased federal funding for prevention efforts targeted at minority communities and administered by community-based organizations. Despite such efforts, the number of minority AIDS cases continued to rise sharply, and by 1996, African Americans accounted for a higher percentage of reported adult cases of AIDS (41%) than did whites.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
American Social History Project / Center for History Media and Learning
Provider Set:
Many Pasts (CHNM/ASHP)
Author:
Center for History and New Media/American Social History Project
A.I. & Society: Conversation with President Obama
Rating

Advances in artificial intelligence are triggering discussions about our future and potential consequences, both good and bad. World leaders are engaging in the conversation as well. Wired Editor-in-Chief, Scott Dadich, and MIT Media Lab Director, Joi Ito, conducted an interview with President Obama on artificial intelligence and society.

In this case study, you will explore an article and video from Wired's conversation with President Obama; then you will be asked to reflect on the core ideas and details of the conversation. As engaged and informed citizens, we must begin to consider the relationship between artificial intelligence and society.

Subject:
Computer Science
Philosophy
Career and Technical Education
Anthropology
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Provider:
Moonshot Learning
About My Lab
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This collection was launched with the mission to share knowledge about lab organization and scientific management. Each Perspective article represents an interview with a Principal Investigator, who shares his or her experience of running a lab by discussing selected topics in an informal and personal style. By creating this collection at PLOS Computational Biology, a journal committed to open knowledge, the collection editors hope to create a dialog through which we all can learn from each other.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Data Set
Primary Source
Provider:
Public Library of Science
Provider Set:
Computer & Information Sciences
Abridged Scholarly Edition of the 1860 "The Tragedy of Hamlet"
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

"The Tragedy of Hamlet" is, first and foremost, a text to be performed. William Shakespeare intended for the text to be seen in performance, not read, and all of the early texts have no reliable connection to Shakespeare's editorial authority.

In light of this, from the very earliest printings, editors have chosen to edit the play's text for particular purposes: to make a quick buck, to memorialize a recently deceased friend, to conform to a time period's unique aesthetic, or to attempt to reconstitute what Shakespeare might have intended in an ideal version of the play.

This particular edition is focused on the student who wants to read the play quickly. The edition is unabashedly abridged. "The Tragedy of Hamlet" is a long play, and, in a time of increasingly compressed curricula, a maximal edition can often take a long time to get through in class. Nearly all performances of the play, both on stage and screen, feel empowered to reduce the size of the play. The Zeffirelli film cuts the play's text by half. Moreover, if we use"Romeo and Juliet"s prologue as a guide that most of Shakespeare's plays were approximately two hours in length, then that suggests that "Hamlet," which can easily reach four-hour run-times in a "full-text" version, can be cut in half and still be coherent.

Therefore, this is a performative textual edition. It cuts the text by 50% but doesn't dumb down Shakespeare's language by modernizing spelling or altering the syntax. In particular, this edition has removed the Fortinbras subplot. Teachers and students should be aware that this removes a significant political theme in the play. It also removes a Hamlet soliloquy and a key foil for Hamlet's character.

This edition is based on the 1860 Globe edition because of its free availability. Later editions (both full-text and abridged) might eventually be offered that are based on a critical conflation of early texts in order to arrive at an ideal authorial-intent text.

Importantly, this edition has the advantage of including textual annotations to help the student understand difficult vocabulary, syntax, and cultural allusions. In this last regard, the edition attempts to be more useful than other online texts of the play that might be freely available but lack helpful guidance for the reader.

Other contextual material are provided to help the student understand early appreciations of the play.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
William Hughes
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Literature
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Susan Ketcham
Academic writing help
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

We provide the best online guidance to students in their career to complete the academic task and achieve success.
Marvel Essay Typer generator is the best choice that you can make..Click here to edit contents of this page.
Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 LicenseEssay writing services ensures the high quality top services and enhance the students to get high scores.
If you want to discuss contents of this page - this is the easiest way to do it.
Append content without editing the whole page source.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy