Updating search results...

Search Resources

17 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • John D
Carpentries Instructor Training
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

A two-day introduction to modern evidence-based teaching practices, built and maintained by the Carpentry community.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Education
Higher Education
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
The Carpentries
Author:
Aleksandra Nenadic
Alexander Konovalov
Alistair John Walsh
Allison Weber
amoskane
Amy E. Hodge
Andrew B. Collier
Anita Schürch
AnnaWilliford
Ariel Rokem
Brian Ballsun-Stanton
Callin Switzer
Christian Brueffer
Christina Koch
Christopher Erdmann
Colin Morris
Dan Allan
DanielBrett
Danielle Quinn
Darya Vanichkina
davidbenncsiro
David Jennings
Eric Jankowski
Erin Alison Becker
Evan Peter Williamson
François Michonneau
Gerard Capes
Greg Wilson
Ian Lee
Jason M Gates
Jason Williams
Jeffrey Oliver
Joe Atzberger
John Bradley
John Pellman
Jonah Duckles
Jonathan Bradley
Karen Cranston
Karen Word
Kari L Jordan
Katherine Koziar
Katrin Leinweber
Kees den Heijer
Laurence
Lex Nederbragt
Maneesha Sane
Marie-Helene Burle
Mik Black
Mike Henry
Murray Cadzow
naught101
Neal Davis
Neil Kindlon
Nicholas Tierney
Nicolás Palopoli
Noah Spies
Paula Andrea Martinez
Petraea
Rayna Michelle Harris
Rémi Emonet
Rémi Rampin
Sarah Brown
Sarah M Brown
Sarah Stevens
satya-vinay
Sean
Serah Anne Njambi Kiburu
Stefan Helfrich
Stéphane Guillou
Steve Moss
Ted Laderas
Tiago M. D. Pereira
Toby Hodges
Tracy Teal
Yo Yehudi
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Estimating the prevalence of transparency and reproducibility-related research practices in psychology (2014-2017)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Psychological science is navigating an unprecedented period of introspection about the credibility and utility of its research. A number of reform initiatives aimed at increasing adoption of transparency and reproducibility-related research practices appear to have been effective in specific contexts; however, their broader, collective impact amidst a wider discussion about research credibility and reproducibility is largely unknown. In the present study, we estimated the prevalence of several transparency and reproducibility-related indicators in the psychology literature published between 2014-2017 by manually assessing these indicators in a random sample of 250 articles. Over half of the articles we examined were publicly available (154/237, 65% [95% confidence interval, 59% to 71%]). However, sharing of important research resources such as materials (26/183, 14% [10% to 19%]), study protocols (0/188, 0% [0% to 1%]), raw data (4/188, 2% [1% to 4%]), and analysis scripts (1/188, 1% [0% to 1%]) was rare. Pre-registration was also uncommon (5/188, 3% [1% to 5%]). Although many articles included a funding disclosure statement (142/228, 62% [56% to 69%]), conflict of interest disclosure statements were less common (88/228, 39% [32% to 45%]). Replication studies were rare (10/188, 5% [3% to 8%]) and few studies were included in systematic reviews (21/183, 11% [8% to 16%]) or meta-analyses (12/183, 7% [4% to 10%]). Overall, the findings suggest that transparent and reproducibility-related research practices are far from routine in psychological science. Future studies can use the present findings as a baseline to assess progress towards increasing the credibility and utility of psychology research.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Jessica Elizabeth Kosie
john Ioannidis
Joshua D Wallach
Mallory Kidwell
Robert T. Thibault
Tom Elis Hardwicke
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Getting an Education
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
3.0 stars

This video segment, adapted from NOVA, chronicles the education of leading chemist Percy Julian. Although Julian began his elementary school years in the Deep South under Jim Crow laws, he became one of the few African Americans of his time to earn a Ph.D.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
02/12/2007
Library Carpentry: The UNIX Shell
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Library Carpentry lesson to learn how to use the Shell. This Library Carpentry lesson introduces librarians to the Unix Shell. At the conclusion of the lesson you will: understand the basics of the Unix shell; understand why and how to use the command line; use shell commands to work with directories and files; use shell commands to find and manipulate data.

Subject:
Applied Science
Information Science
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
The Carpentries
Author:
Adam Huffman
Alexander Konovalov
Alexander Morley
Alex Kassil
Alex Mendes
Ana Costa Conrado
Andrew Reid
Andrew T. T. McRae
Ariel Rokem
Ashwin Srinath
Bagus Tris Atmaja
Belinda Weaver
Benjamin Bolker
Benjamin Gabriel
BertrandCaron
Brian Ballsun-Stanton
Christopher Erdmann
Christopher Mentzel
colinmorris
Colin Sauze
csqrs
Dan Michael Heggø
Dave Bridges
David McKain
Dmytro Lituiev
earkpr
ekaterinailin
Elena Denisenko
Eric Jankowski
Erin Alison Becker
Evan Williamson
Farah Shamma
Gabriel Devenyi
Gerard Capes
Giuseppe Profiti
Halle Burns
Hannah Burkhardt
hugolio
Ian Lessing
Ian van der Linde
Jake Cowper Szamosi
James Baker
James Guelfi
Jarno Rantaharju
Jarosław Bryk
Jason Macklin
Jeffrey Oliver
jenniferleeucalgary
John Pellman
Jonah Duckles
Jonny Williams
Katrin Leinweber
Kevin M. Buckley
Kunal Marwaha
Laurence
Marc Gouw
Marie-Helene Burle
Marisa Lim
Martha Robinson
Martin Feller
Megan Fritz
Michael Lascarides
Michael Zingale
Michele Hayslett
Mike Henry
Morgan Oneka
Murray Hoggett
Nicolas Barral
Nicola Soranzo
Noah D Brenowitz
Owen Kaluza
Patrick McCann
Peter Hoyt
Rafi Ullah
Raniere Silva
Rémi Emonet
reshama shaikh
Ruud Steltenpool
sjnair
Stéphane Guillou
Stephan Schmeing
Stephen Jones
Stephen Leak
Susan J Miller
Thomas Mellan
Tim Dennis
Tom Dowrick
Travis Lilleberg
Victor Koppejan
Vikram Chhatre
Yee Mey
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Pathology Case Study: A 46-year-old man with a spinal cord mass
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

(This case study was added to OER Commons as one of a batch of over 700. It has relevant information which may include medical imagery, lab results, and history where relevant. A link to the final diagnosis can be found at the end of the case study for review. The first paragraph of the case study -- typically, but not always the clinical presentation -- is provided below.)

A 46-year-old man presented with a 2 week history of bilateral lower extremity numbness and tingling. The patient had a past medical history significant for a right posterior fossa medulloblastoma diagnosed at the age of 24, treated with total resection and craniospinal radiation (5040 cGy to the posterior fossa, 3960 cGy to the whole brain, and 3420 cGy to the spine). Twenty-one years later, at the age of 45, the patient experienced progressive right lower extremity weakness and subsequent MRI showed an expansile intradural extramedullary enhancing 1.3 cm T5 level spinal cord lesion. This lesion was presumed to be recurrent medulloblastoma in the form of drop metastasis, and the patient underwent additional radiation to the tumor and a small surrounding margin (3750 cGy). Several months after treatment, at the age of 46, the patient experienced recurrent symptoms of lower leg weakness. A follow-up MRI revealed a 1.4 cm intradural extramedullary lesion at T7 with associated cord edema. Sagittal sequences performed after the administration of intravenous gadolinium chelate demonstrated subtle enhancement (Figure 1). In an effort to confirm the diagnosis of recurrent meduloblastoma and rule out radiation necrosis or a second malignancy as well as to help determine future treatment it was determined that histological confirmation was necessary. The patient underwent an uneventful thoracic laminectomy at T6-T7 with subtotal resection of the intradural lesion.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Education
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Provider Set:
Department of Pathology
Author:
Alexis R. Plaga
John R. Parker
Joseph C. Parker
Jr.
Marc Rosenblum
Mary Ann Sanders
M.D†.
Ph.D.
Todd Vitaz
Date Added:
08/01/2022
Pathology Case Study: A Woman in Her 50's with a Flank Mass
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

(This case study was added to OER Commons as one of a batch of over 700. It has relevant information which may include medical imagery, lab results, and history where relevant. A link to the final diagnosis can be found at the end of the case study for review. The first paragraph of the case study -- typically, but not always the clinical presentation -- is provided below.)

A female in her 50's with a known history of neurofibromatosis type 1 since childhood, and a number of previously resected neurofibromas, presented with an enlarging right flank mass concerning for a plexiform neurofibroma. A computed tomography (CT) abdomen and pelvis with contrast demonstrated a cystic mass measuring up to 7.4 cm within the right abdominal wall (Figure 1, A) with areas of calcification and enhancement.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Education
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Provider Set:
Department of Pathology
Author:
Bruce D. Leckey Jr. DO
Ivy John
Date Added:
08/01/2022
Pathology Case Study: A man in his 70s with nausea and vomiting
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

(This case study was added to OER Commons as one of a batch of over 700. It has relevant information which may include medical imagery, lab results, and history where relevant. A link to the final diagnosis can be found at the end of the case study for review. The first paragraph of the case study -- typically, but not always the clinical presentation -- is provided below.)

This elderly man had a medical and oncologic history significant for a myeloproliferative disorder in the remote past, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, recurrent osteochondroma, prostatic adenocarcinoma, renal insufficiency and coronary artery disease. Past surgical history is notable for a left nephrectomy for "benign" renal disease 28 years earlier and partial colectomy for severe polyposis. He presented for total hip replacement due to worsening hip pain unresponsive to analgesic treatments leaving him virtually bedridden. Several days before his admission, he developed nausea and vomiting with loss of appetite and indeterminate weight loss. Physical examination showed only a slightly enlarged prostate and an abdominal hernia. No abdominal masses or lymphadenopathy were appreciated. Laboratory evaluation then included a complete blood count showing a white blood cell count of 50,700/cu mm with a differential of 6% polymorphonuclear leucocytes, 89% lymphocytes, 3% monocytes, 1% eosinophils, and 1% basophils. Hemoglobin was 11.6 g/dl and platelet count 168,000/cu mm. Electrolytes were within normal limits. Blood urea nitrogen was 32 mg/dl and creatinine 1.7 mg/dl. Liver enzymes, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin were within normal limits. Albumin was marginally low at 3.1 g/dl. Prostatic specific antigen level was 0.1 ng/ml. An abdominal and retroperitoneal ultrasound was performed revealing a 12 cm by 9.5 cm lobulated, hypoechoic soft tissue mass with central necrosis in the right suprarenal region. Subsequent computed tomography scan demonstrated a 10.3 cm by 9.3 cm lobulated heterogeneous right adrenal mass. The mass displaced the right kidney posteriorly and inferiorly with focal compression of the inferior vena cava and extending to the renal hilum (Figures 1A, 1B, and 1C). CT guided biopsy of the mass was diagnosed as cytologically and histologically bland adrenal cortical tissue. The patient subsequently underwent exploratory laparotomy with resection of the adrenal mass. Intraoperatively, a large necrotic appearing tumor encompassed the right adrenal gland, but extended to and was fixed to the inferior vena cava. The tumor was also seen to extend under the right renal vein and involve the right renal hilum. The tumor was incompletely resected secondary to fixation to adjacent structures and intraoperative hemorrhage. This final pathologic diagnosis in this case was based on a compilation of pathologic data including immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and mutational profiling.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Education
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Provider Set:
Department of Pathology
Author:
Eizaburo Sasatomi
John A Ozolek
Patricia A Swalsky
Rajiv Dhir
Sydney D Finkelstein
Date Added:
08/01/2022
Pathology Case Study: An Elderly Man with Lung Adenocarcinoma
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

(This case study was added to OER Commons as one of a batch of over 700. It has relevant information which may include medical imagery, lab results, and history where relevant. A link to the final diagnosis can be found at the end of the case study for review. The first paragraph of the case study -- typically, but not always the clinical presentation -- is provided below.)

The patient was an elderly man in his 80s who presented with dyspnea, fatigue, and subacute weight loss. Imaging identified a large left lower lobe mass with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. A CT-guided biopsy was performed, which identified a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma (Figure 1) which was positive for CK7 and TTF-1 but negative for CK5/6 and p40, consistent with lung origin. Ancillary testing was performed, and the tumor cells were positive for PD-L1 (TPS 50%) and negative for ALK by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was negative for ALK rearrangement (other targets failed). Oncomine next generation sequencing (NGS) was also performed, which identified a TP53 mutation, MET splice site mutation near codon D981, and "fusion" adjoining exons 13 and 15 of MET (Figures 2 and 3).

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Education
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Provider Set:
Department of Pathology
Author:
John M. Skaugen
Tim D. Oury
Yuri E. Nikiforov
Date Added:
08/01/2022
Reproducible research practices, transparency, and open access data in the biomedical literature, 2015–2017
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Currently, there is a growing interest in ensuring the transparency and reproducibility of the published scientific literature. According to a previous evaluation of 441 biomedical journals articles published in 2000–2014, the biomedical literature largely lacked transparency in important dimensions. Here, we surveyed a random sample of 149 biomedical articles published between 2015 and 2017 and determined the proportion reporting sources of public and/or private funding and conflicts of interests, sharing protocols and raw data, and undergoing rigorous independent replication and reproducibility checks. We also investigated what can be learned about reproducibility and transparency indicators from open access data provided on PubMed. The majority of the 149 studies disclosed some information regarding funding (103, 69.1% [95% confidence interval, 61.0% to 76.3%]) or conflicts of interest (97, 65.1% [56.8% to 72.6%]). Among the 104 articles with empirical data in which protocols or data sharing would be pertinent, 19 (18.3% [11.6% to 27.3%]) discussed publicly available data; only one (1.0% [0.1% to 6.0%]) included a link to a full study protocol. Among the 97 articles in which replication in studies with different data would be pertinent, there were five replication efforts (5.2% [1.9% to 12.2%]). Although clinical trial identification numbers and funding details were often provided on PubMed, only two of the articles without a full text article in PubMed Central that discussed publicly available data at the full text level also contained information related to data sharing on PubMed; none had a conflicts of interest statement on PubMed. Our evaluation suggests that although there have been improvements over the last few years in certain key indicators of reproducibility and transparency, opportunities exist to improve reproducible research practices across the biomedical literature and to make features related to reproducibility more readily visible in PubMed.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PLOS Biology
Author:
John P. A. Ioannidis
Joshua D. Wallach
Kevin W. Boyack
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Unit 1: The Food-Energy-Water Connection
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This unit is designed to function as three days of instruction in an introductory urban planning, environmental science/studies or public health course.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Communication
Environmental Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Biology
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Module
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Akin Akinyemi
Cheryl Young
Cynthia Hewitt
John Warford
Richard D. Schulterbrandt Gragg III
Date Added:
01/18/2022
Unit 2: Community-Based Participatory Solutions
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The introduction and examination of the food, energy, and water connection -- as a system in Unit 1 -- established the dictates of human dependency on and human modification of the environment. We continue a logical progression of what this means in Unit 2, with a focus on how people see, confront, and solve their resource challenges in the light of their need for affordable, accessible, healthy, sustainably-grown food. This unit introduces and explores the concepts, themes, and practices of: urban agriculture, urban farming, local food, food insecurity, food deserts, health & wellness education, community food gardens, community food dialogue, public policy, civic engagement, volunteerism, expert technical assistance, land reclamation, grants and incentives, entrepreneurship, and community economic development.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Environmental Studies
Biology
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Module
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Akin Akinyemi
Cheryl Young
Cynthia Hewitt
John Warford
Richard D. Schulterbrandt Gragg III
Date Added:
11/23/2021
Unit 3: Food Systems In Action
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In the capstone, Unit 3, students are provided a real-world example of local community action to address the challenge of "healthy food access." The 2015 Leon County (Florida) Sustainable Communities Summit highlights the results of communities working together to promote environmental and food justice. By the end of Unit 3, instructors can deliver a call to action to empower students to be participatory citizens in their communities. The summative assessment will evaluate the students' ability to synthesize the module learning objectives and demonstrate the use of science practices.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Communication
Environmental Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Biology
Nutrition
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Module
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Akin Akinyemi
Bakari McClendon
Cheryl Young
Cynthia Hewitt
John Warford
Richard D. Schulterbrandt Gragg III
Date Added:
08/23/2022
The Unix Shell
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Software Carpentry lesson on how to use the shell to navigate the filesystem and write simple loops and scripts. The Unix shell has been around longer than most of its users have been alive. It has survived so long because it’s a power tool that allows people to do complex things with just a few keystrokes. More importantly, it helps them combine existing programs in new ways and automate repetitive tasks so they aren’t typing the same things over and over again. Use of the shell is fundamental to using a wide range of other powerful tools and computing resources (including “high-performance computing” supercomputers). These lessons will start you on a path towards using these resources effectively.

Subject:
Computer Science
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
The Carpentries
Author:
Adam Huffman
Adam James Orr
Adam Richie-Halford
AidaMirsalehi
Alexander Konovalov
Alexander Morley
Alex Kassil
Alex Mac
Alix Keener
Amy Brown
Andrea Bedini
Andrew Boughton
Andrew Reid
Andrew T. T. McRae
Andrew Walker
Ariel Rokem
Armin Sobhani
Ashwin Srinath
Bagus Tris Atmaja
Bartosz Telenczuk
Ben Bolker
Benjamin Gabriel
Bertie Seyffert
Bill Mills
Brian Ballsun-Stanton
BrianBill
Camille Marini
Chris Mentzel
Christina Koch
Colin Morris
Colin Sauze
csqrs
Damien Irving
Dana Brunson
Daniel Baird
Danielle M. Nielsen
Daniel McCloy
Daniel Standage
Dan Jones
Dave Bridges
David Eyers
David McKain
David Vollmer
Dean Attali
Devinsuit
Dmytro Lituiev
Donny Winston
Doug Latornell
Dustin Lang
earkpr
ekaterinailin
Elena Denisenko
Emily Dolson
Emily Jane McTavish
Eric Jankowski
Erin Alison Becker
Ethan P White
Evgenij Belikov
Farah Shamma
Fatma Deniz
Filipe Fernandes
Francis Gacenga
François Michonneau
Gabriel A. Devenyi
Gerard Capes
Giuseppe Profiti
Greg Wilson
Halle Burns
Hannah Burkhardt
Harriet Alexander
Hugues Fontenelle
Ian van der Linde
Inigo Aldazabal Mensa
Jackie Milhans
Jake Cowper Szamosi
James Guelfi
Jan T. Kim
Jarek Bryk
Jarno Rantaharju
Jason Macklin
Jay van Schyndel
Jens vdL
John Blischak
John Pellman
John Simpson
Jonah Duckles
Jonny Williams
Joshua Madin
Kai Blin
Kathy Chung
Katrin Leinweber
Kevin M. Buckley
Kirill Palamartchouk
Klemens Noga
Kristopher Keipert
Kunal Marwaha
Laurence
Lee Zamparo
Lex Nederbragt
Mahdi Sadjadi
Marcel Stimberg
Marc Rajeev Gouw
Maria Doyle
Marie-Helene Burle
Marisa Lim
Mark Mandel
Martha Robinson
Martin Feller
Matthew Gidden
Matthew Peterson
M Carlise
Megan Fritz
Michael Zingale
Mike Henry
Mike Jackson
Morgan Oneka
Murray Hoggett
Nicolas Barral
Nicola Soranzo
Noah D Brenowitz
Noam Ross
Norman Gray
nther
Orion Buske
Owen Kaluza
Patrick McCann
Paul Gardner
Pauline Barmby
Peter R. Hoyt
Peter Steinbach
Philip Lijnzaad
Phillip Doehle
Piotr Banaszkiewicz
Rafi Ullah
Raniere Silva
Rémi Emonet
reshama shaikh
Robert A Beagrie
Ruud Steltenpool
Ry4an Brase
Sarah Mount
Sarah Simpkin
s-boardman
Scott Ritchie
sjnair
Stéphane Guillou
Stephan Schmeing
Stephen Jones
Stephen Turner
Steve Leak
Susan Miller
Thomas Mellan
Tim Keighley
Tobin Magle
Tom Dowrick
Trevor Bekolay
Varda F. Hagh
Victor Koppejan
Vikram Chhatre
Yee Mey
Date Added:
03/20/2017
WHCL Open Educational Resources
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

Toolkits and eReader Tutorial
Of special importance is this video tutorial for students on how to study from OER materials: Reading on Electronic Devices: A Tutorial (Bonilla 2016).
There are three toolkits: toolkit 1offers relevant materials and resources on:
What is OER? What is an open textbook?
A Bibliography of case studies, user stories, and peer-reviewed articles on adopting OER textbooks and materials
A list of resources for finding OER textbooks and materials
Recommendations on how to advocate for OER adoption to particular audiences (faculty, deans, presidents, and other stakeholders)
Toolkit 2:offers relevant materials and resources on:
Crafting faculty development workshops
Demonstrating faculty use of OER textbooks
Tutorials on finding OER materials once faculty have been identified
Tutorials on student use of OER textbooks
Information on ADA compliance
How to peer review OER materials
Identifying best practices to facilitate OER textbook adoption, implementation, and use
Creating a sustainable OER adoption plan
Toolkit 3: offers relevant materials and resources on:
Offers videos of user stories by faculty who have adopted, implemented, and used OER textbooks
This toolkit also contains ADA compliance reviews of all textbooks that have been reviewed on COOL4Ed

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
British Columbia Open Textbook Project
I Elaine Allen Jeff Seaman
John D
This page is an adaption of Lansing Community College (LCC) Library Research Guide on Open Educational Resources (OER) by Regina Gong is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Date Added:
02/21/2019
A call for transparent reporting to optimize the predictive value of preclinical research
Rating
0.0 stars

Deficiencies in methods reporting in animal experimentation lead to difficulties in reproducing experiments; the authors propose a set of reporting standards to improve scientific communication and study design. The US National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke convened major stakeholders in June 2012 to discuss how to improve the methodological reporting of animal studies in grant applications and publications. The main workshop recommendation is that at a minimum studies should report on sample-size estimation, whether and how animals were randomized, whether investigators were blind to the treatment, and the handling of data. We recognize that achieving a meaningful improvement in the quality of reporting will require a concerted effort by investigators, reviewers, funding agencies and journal editors. Requiring better reporting of animal studies will raise awareness of the importance of rigorous study design to accelerate scientific progress.

Author:
Amelie K. Gubitz
Chris P. Austin
David W. Howells
Dimitri Krainc
Eileen W. Bradley
Ellis Unger
Howard E. Gendelman
Howard Fillit
John D. Porter
John Huguenard
John L. Goudreau
John M. McCall
Kalyani Narasimhan
Katrina Kelner
Khusru Asadullah
Linda J. Noble
Malcolm R. Macleod
Marc Fisher
Michael S. Levine
Oswald Steward
Richard T. Moxley III
Robert A. Gross
Robert B. Darnell
Robert Finkelstein
Robert J. Ferrante
Robert M. Golub
Robi Blumenstein
Ronald G. Crystal
Shai D. Silberberg
Sharon E. Hesterlee
Stanley E. Lazic
Steve Perrin
Story C. Landis
Susan G. Amara
Ursula Utz
Walter Koroshetz
Date Added:
08/08/2020
A consensus-based transparency checklist
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

We present a consensus-based checklist to improve and document the transparency of research reports in social and behavioural research. An accompanying online application allows users to complete the form and generate a report that they can submit with their manuscript or post to a public repository.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Nature Human Behaviour
Author:
Agneta Fisher
Alexandra M. Freund
Alexandra Sarafoglou
Alice S. Carter
Andrew A. Bennett
Andrew Gelman
Balazs Aczel
Barnabas Szaszi
Benjamin R. Newell
Brendan Nyhan
Candice C. Morey
Charles Clifton
Christopher Beevers
Christopher D. Chambers
Christopher Sullivan
Cristina Cacciari
Daniel Benjamin
Daniel J. Simons
David R. Shanks
Debra Lieberman
Derek Isaacowitz
Dolores Albarracin
Don P. Green
D. Stephen Lindsay
Eric-Jan Wagenmakers
Eric Johnson
Eveline A. Crone
Fernando Hoces de la Guardia
Fiammetta Cosci
George C. Banks
Gordon D. Logan
Hal R. Arkes
Harold Pashler
Janet Kolodner
Jarret Crawford
Jeffrey Pollack
Jelte M. Wicherts
John Antonakis
John Curtin
John P. Ioannidis
Joseph Cesario
Kai Jonas
Lea Moersdorf
Lisa L. Harlow
Marcus Munafò
Mark Fichman
M. Gareth Gaskell
Mike Cortese
Mitja D. Back
Morton A. Gernsbacher
Nelson Cowan
Nicole D. Anderson
Pasco Fearon
Randall Engle
Robert L. Greene
Roger Giner-Sorolla
Ronán M. Conroy
Scott O. Lilienfeld
Simine Vazire
Simon Farrell
Šimon Kucharský
Stavroula Kousta
Ty W. Boyer
Wendy B. Mendes
Wiebke Bleidorn
Willem Frankenhuis
Zoltan Kekecs
Date Added:
08/07/2020
A manifesto for reproducible science
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Improving the reliability and efficiency of scientific research will increase the credibility of the published scientific literature and accelerate discovery. Here we argue for the adoption of measures to optimize key elements of the scientific process: methods, reporting and dissemination, reproducibility, evaluation and incentives. There is some evidence from both simulations and empirical studies supporting the likely effectiveness of these measures, but their broad adoption by researchers, institutions, funders and journals will require iterative evaluation and improvement. We discuss the goals of these measures, and how they can be implemented, in the hope that this will facilitate action toward improving the transparency, reproducibility and efficiency of scientific research.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Nature Human Behaviour
Author:
Brian A. Nosek
Christopher D. Chambers
Dorothy V. M. Bishop
Eric-Jan Wagenmakers
Jennifer J. Ware
John P. A. Ioannidis
Katherine S. Button
Marcus R. Munafò
Nathalie Percie du Sert
Uri Simonsohn
Date Added:
08/07/2020