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2a. "I Love Lucy"
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Lucy belonged to genus Australopithecus and the species afarensis, but she also belonged to the the hominid family (hominidae) to which humans belong. Although humans are of the family hominidae, we are not of Lucy's genus or species. We are Homo sapiens. How then, can Lucy be our ancient ancestor if we belong to a different genus and species? It's because humans and Lucy share a taxonomy up to the point of genus and species; there are many shared characteristics, but there are differences and these differences place humans in our own genus and species.

Subject:
Ancient History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
12/05/2014
The Ancient City, Spring 2005
Conditions of Use:
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This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world. Analyzes a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Broadhead, William
Date Added:
01/01/2005
The Anthropocene, Overview
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This presentation offers an overview of the developing concept of The Anthropocene -- a term coined to describe our current geological epoch, in which human impact on the planet will leave a permanent trace.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Scott W. Schwartz
Date Added:
05/11/2017
Archeology for Interpreters, A Guide to the Knowledge of the Resource
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Help students learn about archaeological methods and how archaeological interpretations are made. It is organized around questions that include: What is archeology? What do archaeologists do? How do archaeologists determine how old things are?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
National Register of Historic Places
Date Added:
07/08/2003
Artifacts 1: What Can We Learn From Artifacts?
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In this Science NetLinks lesson, students determine what artifacts are, how they are discovered, and what information can be learned from them. They also learn how artifacts are initially buried and then excavated. This lesson is one of a two-part series on archaeology.

Subject:
Geology
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005
Artifacts 2: Artifacts in Context
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In this Science NetLinks lesson, students hypothesize how people lived during a certain time, based on archaeological sites and artifacts. This lesson puts students in the role of archaeologist, using the mysterious city of Catalhoyuk to explore how artifacts can give us clues to how people once lived. Students will explore an archaeological mystery that demonstrates the importance of context in learning from artifacts. Factors such as the artifact's location, its proximity to other artifacts, and the number of similar artifacts found can provide strong clues about the possible purpose and origins of the artifact, as well as the physical characteristics and behaviors of people responsible for creating it. This lesson is the second of a two-part series on archaeology.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
06/14/2009
Carbon 14 Dating
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The task requires the student to use logarithms to solve an exponential equation in the realistic context of carbon dating, important in archaeology and geology, among other places. Students should be guided to recognize the use of the natural logarithm when the exponential function has the given base of e, as in this problem. Note that the purpose of this task is algebraic in nature -- closely related tasks exist which approach similar problems from numerical or graphical stances.

Subject:
Mathematics
Functions
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
05/01/2012
Cave Bear
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Decoding an ancient cave bear. A two-ton, thirteen-foot cave bear, extinct for ten thousand years, has just experienced a rebirth of sorts. From a tooth and a bone, scientists have recovered its entire genetic code.Eddy Rubin, director of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute, says finding genuine cave bear DNA was like looking for a needle in a haystack. The haystack were all the other organisms that were living in the bones and in the tooth of this ancient creature. And the needle was the little bit of the ancient creature's genome DNA, or genes.They used state-of-the-art computer technology to separate the bear genes from the clutter. Jurassic Park fans should note that they can't clone a new cave bear, nor can they recover DNA from creatures as old as the dinosaurs. But they do hope to reconstruct the genetic code of Neanderthals, our closest non-human relatives, to better understand how our own species evolved. This resource contains detailed text description of the research as well as likes for further inquiry.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
08/16/2009
Fossils 1: Fossils and Dinosaurs
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson will go beyond naming dinosaurs and give students a broad understanding of how we know about the great beasts. This lesson focuses on what we have learned and can learn from fossils. The follow-up lesson, Dinosaurs Fossils - Uncovering the Facts, explores what information can be discerned by comparing fossils to living organisms.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005
Fossils 2: Uncovering the Facts
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In Fossils and Dinosaurs, the first lesson of this two lesson series, students learned the differences between facts and ideas that are extrapolated from fossil evidence. This lesson allows students to go through an 'interview' with the remains of a Protoceratops. In preparation for the interview, students first brainstorm the questions they would like answers to, and then narrow their questions to those that can be answered by studying the Protoceratops fossils.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005
Genes and Geography
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Our early human ancestors began migrating across the globe tens of thousands of years ago. Some left behind archaeological evidence of their travels. But as you'll hear in this Science Update, another record of where we come from and where we've been might be found right in our DNA.

Subject:
Genetics
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
03/25/2007
History & Culture
Conditions of Use:
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offers educators Park Service resources that help teach about our nation's cultural heritage, and which look at how the NPS is protecting and preserving them. Subjects include archaeology, historic buildings and structures, mapping, military history, and national historic landmarks. The resources may be in the form of learning programs, case studies, lesson plans, teachers' handbooks, and more.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Case Study
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
12/01/2004
Hominid Diet
Conditions of Use:
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Between one and two million years ago, several different groups of ape-men roamed the plains of Africa. The only clues we have as to how they lived and evolved come from fossils they left behind. This Science Update tells us what some of those fossils reveal about the unusual diet of early hominids.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/01/2005
Human Origins and Evolution, Spring 2006
Conditions of Use:
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Examines the dynamic interrelations among physical and behavioral traits of humans, environment, and culture to provide an integrated framework for studying human biological evolution and modern diversity. Topics include issues in morphological evolution and adaptation; fossil and cultural evidence for human evolution from earliest times through the Pleistocene; evolution of tool use and social behavior; modern human variation and concepts of race. Includes study of stone artifacts and fossil specimens.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
MerrickHarry
Date Added:
01/01/2006
The Human Past: Introduction to Archaeology, Fall 2006
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Archaeology reconstructs ancient human activities and their environmental contexts. Drawing on case studies in contrasting environmental settings from the Near East and Mesoamerica, considers these activities and the forces that shaped them. In laboratory sessions students encounter various classes of archaeological data and analyze archaeological artifacts made from materials such as stone, bone, ceramics, glass, and metal. These analyses help reconstruct the past. This class introduces the multidisciplinary nature of archaeology, both in theory and practice. Lectures provide a comparative examination of the origins of agriculture and the rise of early civilizations in the ancient Near East and Mesoamerica. The laboratory sessions provide practical experience in aspects of archaeological field methods and analytical techniques including the examination of stone, ceramic, and metal artifacts and bone materials. Lab sessions have occasional problem sets which are completed outside of class.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harry Merrick
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Inca Investigation
Rating

This OLogy activity gives kids a chance to test their investigative skills while learning about daily life for the Incas. Inca Investigation begins with an introduction to archaeologist Craig Morris and the ancient Inca city that his team excavated in the Andes mountains. Detailed directions are given for how to play Inca Investigation, which includes tips to help them better examine evidence. Each time they correctly identify a place, they are awarded an Inca Chronicle. They have the option of reading the chronicles online or printing their collection of chronicles.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Interactive
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
10/15/2014
Introduction to Archaeology Course Docs
Conditions of Use:
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Course readings and assignments for Introduction to Archaeology course. Readings are from the library ebook World Prehistory: a brief introduction by Brian Fagan and Nadia Durrani. Taylor and Francis 2016 9th ed. ISBN 9781315641133.

Course Description
Introduces archaeology as the anthropological study of humans in the past and the present through the examination of cultural materials and human remains. Considers archaeological theories and methods and ethical issues related to cultural resource management and excavation. Examines systems of power and social justice related to ancient societies and compares them wit h similar systems and issues in contemporary societies from an anthropological perspective. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.
Intended Outcomes for the course
Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

Use an understanding of archaeological methods and theories to evaluate artifacts and other data.
Describe the impact of human beings on the environment over time and in different ecological settings.
Discuss ethical issues related to cultural resource management and the excavation and study of human remains associated with indigenous societies from an anthropological perspective.
Examine systems of power and social justice related to ancient societies and compare them with similar systems of power and privilege in contemporary societies from an anthropological perspective.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Mary Courtis
Date Added:
03/04/2020