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The Anthropocene, Overview
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This presentation offers an overview of the developing concept of The Anthropocene -- a term coined to describe our current geological epoch, in which human impact on the planet will leave a permanent trace.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Scott W. Schwartz
Date Added:
05/11/2017
Archeology for Interpreters, A Guide to the Knowledge of the Resource
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Public Domain
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Help students learn about archaeological methods and how archaeological interpretations are made. It is organized around questions that include: What is archeology? What do archaeologists do? How do archaeologists determine how old things are?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
National Register of Historic Places
Date Added:
07/08/2003
Barwick's Ordinary - An Introduction to Archaeology Vocabulary
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CC BY
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Students are introduced to archaeology vocab through the case of "Barwick's Ordinary," a historic tavern, gathering place, home, and center of business in 1700s Maryland. Students are briefly introduced to the story of the ordinary then explore a 3D "art gallery" with scans of artifacts from the site as well as maps, surveys, and drone photographs. Internet access is currently required. Paintings by John Lewis Krimmel help illustrate how things may have looked. An extension is to conduct some more detailed reading into the role of ordinaries, a ubiquituous feature of the European colonies in America. There are 3 activities to "meet" Barwick's, followed by 2 summative activities.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Social Science
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
07/21/2022
Carbon 14 Dating
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CC BY
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The task requires the student to use logarithms to solve an exponential equation in the realistic context of carbon dating, important in archaeology and geology, among other places. Students should be guided to recognize the use of the natural logarithm when the exponential function has the given base of e, as in this problem. Note that the purpose of this task is algebraic in nature -- closely related tasks exist which approach similar problems from numerical or graphical stances.

Subject:
Mathematics
Functions
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
05/01/2012
Ceramic Mending Activity
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CC BY
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Mending is an important part of archaeology, as it can be used to establish relationships between different parts of an archaeological site. This resource is a tutorial detailing how to perform a ceramic mending activity with your students. Use it to support Maryland Math Standard 7.G.B.4-6 for grade 7 by focusing on the mending of round ceramics and determining their circumference or diameter from pieces. If you evaluate this resource or use it, please consider responding to this short (4 question) survey bit.ly/3rw0WQY

Subject:
Art History
Geometry
Social Science
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Conserving Waterlogged Wood
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CC BY
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This video resource is presented as a real-world application of chemistry in the field of conservation archaeology. Conservator, Francis Lukezic, walks through the conservation practices for waterlogged archaeological wood and explains the chemical and cellular processes at work. Use to support Maryland/NGSS for Grades 5, MS, and HS. For 5-PS1-1 and MS-PS1-1, have students watch or perform the paper clip demonstration and discuss how the hydrogen bonding of water allows this then is disrupted by the soap; have students develop diagrams explaining the phenomenon of surface tension on the molecular level. For HS-PS2-6, have students watch or perform the sponge demonstration and discuss how the molecular structure of the wood makes it vulnerable to becoming waterlogged then brainstorm materials that are more resilient to water and discuss the uses of the materials. For interdisciplinary connections to geography and history, have students research why Maryland archaeologists do or do not discover the materials brainstormed instead of wood. If you evaluate or use this resource, please respond to this short (4 question) survey bit.ly/3DhRumA

Subject:
Chemistry
Social Science
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Digging into Archaeology: A Brief OER Introduction to Archaeology with Activities
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This book is intended for use in a variety of introductory archaeology settings, such as in lectures and lab courses. This text can complement an existing traditional text or completely replace a standard text. It can be used for its activities or as a study resource. When we wrote this text, we designed the chapters to be brief, providing concise and to-the-point information. This book is not intended to replace lectures or direct instruction from an instructor; rather, it supports learning in a variety of settings and formats. The book can be printed in whole, read digitally, or used piecemeal in either format. However you use this text, we hope that you find it serves as an instructive learning tool and that you dig archaeology as much as we do!

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Amanda Walcott Paskey
AnnMarie Beasley Cisneros
Date Added:
11/18/2021
Education and Home Life for Black Sharecroppers in Southern Maryland (1870s-1920s)
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CC BY
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4.0 stars

Consider the need for home education for Black and African-American families in Southern Maryland in the 1870s through 1920s, when public education was unavailable or inaccessible. This resource combines 3D models and 2D interaction to introduce students to Alphabet Wares/Alphabet Plates as found at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum when excavating "Sukeek's Cabin," a late-19th century home by a newly-freed family on the park grounds. Themes include unjust limitations, archaeology as a primary source, and home life in the 1870s-1920s. The resource includes simple prompts and resources for hypothesizing about archaeological findings, researching them, drawing conclusions, and suggestions for further reflection.

This resource uses Genial.ly, an online-presentation service, with additional tools by S'CAPE to increase the interactivity. Public Genial.lys may be remixed into new presentations after signing up for an account with the service.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. More of our content can be found on OER Commons, YouTube, and SketchFab. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Social Science
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
04/18/2022
Electrolytic Reduction for Artifact Conservation
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CC BY
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This video resource is presented as a real-world application of chemistry in the field of archaeology. Conservator, Nichole Doub, walks through the process of electrolytic reduction and how it is used to conserve archaeologically recovered artifacts. Use to support Maryland/NGSS for grades 5, MS, and HS. For 5-PS1-1, pair with the Exploratorium's "Copper Caper" activity for a similar reaction which can be conducted safely in the classroom--have students watch the video and discuss why the spoon formed tarnish and why the tarnish was not visible as particles moved from the spoon to the sacrificial anode. For MS-PS1-1, pair with the Exploratorium's "Indicating Electrolysis" activity and have the students explain the charges of oxygen/hydrogen and compare/contrast those with the silver and sulfur in the tarnish. Have students research silver sulfide (the usual tarnish found on silver artifacts) and model a single molecule of it before and after electrolysis. For HS-PS1-1 have students research silver sulfide and model a molecule of it prior to watching the video and predict what will happen when the positive or negative charges change. For HS-PS2-6, have students postulate why, historically, coins were made from silver and gold (with reference to their chemical reactions), then have students design a coin and specify a different metal to make it out of, explaining why the atomic properties of that metal make it appropriate for use in currency. If you evaluate or use this resource, consider responding to this short (4 question) survey at bit.ly/3G0bNqy

Subject:
Art History
Chemistry
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Experimental Archaeology
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CC BY
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Imagine trying to cut your hair without metal tools. How would you do it? Join JPPM's Educator Nate Salzman as he uses experimental archaeology to answer the question "How did Native Americans cut their hair before metal tools?" Use to support the Maryland Social Studies Framework for grades 3, 4, and High School. To support the grade 3 content topic "Cultural Change Over Time," have students compare the advantages/disadvantages of the results of this experiment and how they receive a hair cut; for grade 4 topic "Native Cultures," have students either hypothesize and research how Native American tribes who did not have access to shells may have cut their hair or respond to the prompt "why did European colonists use metal tools for cutting their hair while the Native Americans used shells? Would some hair styles be easier to cut with one type of tool than the other?"; finally for HS topic "Exploration, Colonization, and Global Interaction, have students respond to the prompt "with the introduction of metal tools, how might the role of 'barber' have changed within a Native American tribe? If you evaluate or use this resource, consider responding to this short (4 question) survey at bit.ly/3G6RxUa

Subject:
World Cultures
History
Anthropology
Archaeology
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Gender stereotypes in archaeology
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This booklet is a short but informative and critical response by archaeologists to various gender stereotypes that exist in the archaeological explanation of the past, as well as in the contemporary disciplinary practice.

The booklet includes 24 commonly encountered gender stereotypes in archaeology, explained and deconstructed in 250 words by archaeologists with expertise on gender in the past and in contemporary archaeology, most of them being members of the Archaeology and Gender in Europe (AGE) Community of the European Association of Archaeologists. In addition, the stereotypes are beautifully illustrated by Serbian award-winning artist Nikola Radosavljević.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Bisserka Gaydarska
Laura Coltofean-Arizancu
Uroš Matić
Date Added:
03/23/2022
History & Culture
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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offers educators Park Service resources that help teach about our nation's cultural heritage, and which look at how the NPS is protecting and preserving them. Subjects include archaeology, historic buildings and structures, mapping, military history, and national historic landmarks. The resources may be in the form of learning programs, case studies, lesson plans, teachers' handbooks, and more.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Case Study
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
12/01/2004
How to apply paper artifact labels
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CC BY
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Sara Rivers-Cofield, Curator of Federal Collections at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, walks through applying acid-free paper labels to artifacts. This is an alternative to labelling artifacts with permanent archival ink, and the tutorial is appropriate for both students and professional education. The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) standards and guidelines for preparing artifact collections and their associated records, both paper and digital, for permanent curation at the lab can be found at https://jefpat.maryland.gov/Documents/mac-lab/technical-update-no1-collections-and-conservation-standards.pdf

The MAC Lab is a state-of-the-art archaeological research, conservation, and curation facility located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, the State Museum of Archaeology. The MAC Lab serves as the primary repository for archaeological collections recovered from land-based and underwater projects conducted by state and federal agencies throughout Maryland.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Applied Science
History
Social Science
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
11/17/2021
How to pack artifact bags and boxes
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CC BY
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Walk through how to pack artifacts in bags and boxes for curation and storage with Sara Rivers-Cofield, Curator of Federal Collections, and Alice Merkel, Collections Assistant, at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory. In addition, tips are offered as to how best to arrange boxes to simplify handling and, as always, best protect artifacts. The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) standards and guidelines for preparing artifact collections and their associated records, for permanent curation at the lab can be found at https://jefpat.maryland.gov/Documents/mac-lab/technical-update-no1-collections-and-conservation-standards.pdf

The MAC Lab is a state-of-the-art archaeological research, conservation, and curation facility located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, the State Museum of Archaeology. The MAC Lab serves as the primary repository for archaeological collections recovered from land-based and underwater projects conducted by state and federal agencies throughout Maryland.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
03/30/2022
I Bacini Culturali e la progettazione sociale orientata all’Heritage-Making, tra Politiche giovanili, Innovazione sociale, Diversità culturale
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Il volume rappresenta la tappa finale della prima stagione di implementazione del Progetto ABACUS (giugno 2019 - settembre 2020), sostenuta dal finanziamento pubblico garantito dalla Regione Siciliana e dalla Presidenza del Consiglio dei Ministri. In tal senso, la pubblicazione raccoglie sia una sezione di materiali di discussione critica sul percorso progettuale e sui primi esiti maturati, sia una ricca parte di contributi tematici offerti da referenti istituzionali, studiosi ed esperti, docenti accademici e ricercatori, professionisti e rappresentanti di organismi del Terzo settore Sono state così affrontate ed esaminate differenti tematiche e problematiche socio-culturali e socio-economiche, e prospettive e approcci metodologico-operativi tra loro affini e convergenti, che si sviluppano a cavallo delle politiche sociali, giovanili e culturali, della progettazione sociale e culturale, dell'innovazione sociale e della diversità culturale, in differenti contesti socio-territoriali siciliani e italiani, con una particolare attenzione per quelle iniziative che rappresentano casi paradigmatici in cui le istanze istituzionali, della ricerca, dell'educazione e della formazione si incontrano con le aspettative dei pubblici differenziati e, specialmente, delle giovani generazioni, anche sull'orizzonte della innovazione dell'occupazione giovanile.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Computer Science
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Graphic Arts
Languages
Performing Arts
Philosophy
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Communication
Management
Marketing
Public Relations
Career and Technical Education
Culinary Arts
Environmental Studies
Education
Educational Technology
Higher Education
Special Education
History
Law
Ecology
Measurement and Data
Hydrology
Social Science
Anthropology
Archaeology
Cultural Geography
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Author:
Alessandra Caravale
Alessia Bono
Andrea De Tommasi
Andrea Messina
Angela Vitale
Antonija Netolicki
Antonio Grasso
Antonio Sutera
Carlo Volpe
Caterina Mulè
Claudio La Rocca
Daniele Tulone
Davide Silvestri
Eleonora Giovene di Girasole
Elisabetta Di Stefano
Erika Coco
Fabio Pagano
Federica Lamonaca
Filippo Gravagno
Francesca Piazza
Francesca Rita Cerami
Francesco Iacono Quarantino
Gabriela Del Rosario Abate
Gabriella Paolini
Giorgia Leoni
Giovanna Sedita
Giuseppe Bivona
Giusi Carioto
Giusy Pappalardo
Ilaria Vitellio
Lucia Piastra
Luisella Pavan-Woolfe
Maria Chiara Falcone
Maria Laura Scaduto
Massimo Clemente
Matteo Tedo Fici
Mirella Serlorenzi
Riccardo Pozzo
Rossella Mancini
Sabrina Tomassini
Salvatore Aurelio Bruno
Stefania Picciola
Stefan Luca Mangione
Susanna Gristina
Tiziana Bonsignore
Ugo Arioti
Vanessa Mantia
Vania Virgili
Vilislava Metodieva
Yoanna Yordanova
Date Added:
04/01/2021
If You Find an Artifact...
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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What should you do if you're lucky enough to find an artifact? In this resource, JPPM Educator Kenny walks you through a simple 4-step process for making sure your find gets taken care of. Use to support Maryland Social Studies Frameworks for Grades 2 and 3. For Grade 2 Content Topic "Civic Engagement" search OER Commons for the related resource "JPPM - Marv's Story". Read the story together then as a class discuss and explore students' ideas of citizenship by asking whether Marv was a good citizen and if she could have made a different decision while still being a good citizen then have students reflect further by creating short profiles of people they respect, writing what makes them good citizens. For Grade 3 Content Topic "Civic Virtue" do the same except before discussing Marv's story have some students list their responsibilities if they find an artifact while others list what they are technically free to do even if they find an artifact. Then as a class decide if Marv had even more responsibility to do something when artifacts were found on her farm. If you evaluate or use this resource, please respond to this short (4 question) survey at bit.ly/3Gb4ZX5

Subject:
History
Social Science
Archaeology
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/03/2021
Immersive Experiences in Natural and Cultural History Education
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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Imagine being transported into an entirely new world, or see the world you know being transformed in fantastical ways: that is what immersive experiences can deliver. Traditional classroom learning can be restrictive and at times dull, but virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), and mixed reality (MR) can offer transformative learning experiences that are novel, interactive, and exciting. There is nothing quite like the immersive experience that this media and these technologies offer. It these experiences and this technology pertaining to education and natural and cultural history that we explore in this open course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Educational Technology
History
Life Science
Archaeology
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Erica Hargreave
Johannes Wielenga
Yannick Wong
Date Added:
01/22/2021
Introduction to Archaeology Course Docs
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CC BY
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Course readings and assignments for Introduction to Archaeology course. Readings are from the library ebook World Prehistory: a brief introduction by Brian Fagan and Nadia Durrani. Taylor and Francis 2016 9th ed. ISBN 9781315641133.

Course Description
Introduces archaeology as the anthropological study of humans in the past and the present through the examination of cultural materials and human remains. Considers archaeological theories and methods and ethical issues related to cultural resource management and excavation. Examines systems of power and social justice related to ancient societies and compares them wit h similar systems and issues in contemporary societies from an anthropological perspective. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.
Intended Outcomes for the course
Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

Use an understanding of archaeological methods and theories to evaluate artifacts and other data.
Describe the impact of human beings on the environment over time and in different ecological settings.
Discuss ethical issues related to cultural resource management and the excavation and study of human remains associated with indigenous societies from an anthropological perspective.
Examine systems of power and social justice related to ancient societies and compare them with similar systems of power and privilege in contemporary societies from an anthropological perspective.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Mary Courtis
Date Added:
03/04/2020
JPPM - Marv's Story
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CC BY
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What should you do if you're lucky enough to find an artifact? In this resource, JPPM Educator Kenny walks you through a simple 4-step process for making sure your find gets taken care of. Available in video and text form, this resource also includes connections for instructors to Maryland State Social Studies Frameworks for grades 2 and 3 on Civic Engagment and Civic Virtue.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Archaeology
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Reading
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
06/29/2021