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2a. "I Love Lucy"
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Lucy belonged to genus Australopithecus and the species afarensis, but she also belonged to the the hominid family (hominidae) to which humans belong. Although humans are of the family hominidae, we are not of Lucy's genus or species. We are Homo sapiens. How then, can Lucy be our ancient ancestor if we belong to a different genus and species? It's because humans and Lucy share a taxonomy up to the point of genus and species; there are many shared characteristics, but there are differences and these differences place humans in our own genus and species.

Subject:
Ancient History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
12/05/2014
The Ancient City, Spring 2005
Conditions of Use:
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This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world. Analyzes a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Broadhead, William
Date Added:
01/01/2005
The Anthropocene, Overview
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This presentation offers an overview of the developing concept of The Anthropocene -- a term coined to describe our current geological epoch, in which human impact on the planet will leave a permanent trace.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Scott W. Schwartz
Date Added:
05/11/2017
Archaeological Context
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Students will use a game and a discussion to demonstrate the importance of artifacts in context for learning about past people.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
UNC Archaeology
Date Added:
06/25/1999
The Archaeology of Hidden Cave, Nevada
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This online article tells the story of the discovery of Nevada's Hidden Cave and the archaeologists who excavated there in the 1940s, 1950s, and late 1970s. The article has more than a dozen photographs of the cave and the treasures found within it.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Data Set
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
10/15/2014
Archeology for Interpreters, A Guide to the Knowledge of the Resource
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Help students learn about archaeological methods and how archaeological interpretations are made. It is organized around questions that include: What is archeology? What do archaeologists do? How do archaeologists determine how old things are?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
National Register of Historic Places
Date Added:
07/08/2003
Artifact Classification (Archaeology)
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In their study of artifact classification students will use pictures of artifacts or objects from a teaching kit to classify artifacts and answer questions about the lifeways of a group of historic Native Americans.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
UNC Archaeology
Date Added:
06/25/1999
Artifact Ethics (Archaeology)
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In their study of archaeological issues students will use ethical dilemmas to examine their own values and beliefs about archaeological site protection and evaluate possible actions they might take regarding site and artifact protection.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
UNC Archaeology
Date Added:
06/25/1999
Artifacts 1: What Can We Learn From Artifacts?
Conditions of Use:
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In this Science NetLinks lesson, students determine what artifacts are, how they are discovered, and what information can be learned from them. They also learn how artifacts are initially buried and then excavated. This lesson is one of a two-part series on archaeology.

Subject:
Geology
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005
Artifacts 2: Artifacts in Context
Conditions of Use:
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In this Science NetLinks lesson, students hypothesize how people lived during a certain time, based on archaeological sites and artifacts. This lesson puts students in the role of archaeologist, using the mysterious city of Catalhoyuk to explore how artifacts can give us clues to how people once lived. Students will explore an archaeological mystery that demonstrates the importance of context in learning from artifacts. Factors such as the artifact's location, its proximity to other artifacts, and the number of similar artifacts found can provide strong clues about the possible purpose and origins of the artifact, as well as the physical characteristics and behaviors of people responsible for creating it. This lesson is the second of a two-part series on archaeology.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
06/14/2009
Beyond T. Rex
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This fun Web site is part of OLogy, where kids can collect virtual trading cards and create projects with them. Here, they learn about cladograms and the vast variety of dinosaurs that once roamed Earth. The activity opens by telling kids that there are more than 400 known species of extinct dinosaurs and by explaining how cladograms show their relationships to one another. Students then go to an interactive cladogram that has 19 dinosaur species, ranging from Velociraptor mongolienis and Eudromia elegans to Protoceratops andrewsi and Drinker nisti. Each of the 19 dinosaurs includes a trading card with details about the species and its discovery, photographs, and interactive multiple-choice and "Fact or Fiction?" quizzes.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Building up One Empire while Tearing Down Another: Scholars, Missionaries and Spies in the Ottoman Middle East
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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This module explores the careers of British archaeologist T.E. Lawrence and Czech scholar Alois Musil. Both men were scholars, but also agents for their respective governments. As with many figures active in the age of European colonialism, Lawrence and Musil created an important intellectual legacy, but their value as contemporary witnesses is diminished somewhat by their imperial outlook and subsequent inability to attain any approximation of objectivity.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Michael Decker
Date Added:
10/31/2006
Buried Bones
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This fun Web site is part of OLogy, where kids can collect virtual trading cards and create projects with them. Here, they learn about paleontology with a hands-on activity. The activity opens with an explanation covering how fossilized bones are usually very delicate and buried deeply in rock fossils. Students are then given step-by-step directions for working with a friend to create two make-believe dig sites by burying bones in plaster of Paris. The activity ends with three discussion questions: What was surprising about excavating the bones? What strategies did you find worked well for removing the plaster? How would you have worked differently if you had no idea what was buried inside?

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Carbon 14 Dating
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The task requires the student to use logarithms to solve an exponential equation in the realistic context of carbon dating, important in archaeology and geology, among other places. Students should be guided to recognize the use of the natural logarithm when the exponential function has the given base of e, as in this problem. Note that the purpose of this task is algebraic in nature -- closely related tasks exist which approach similar problems from numerical or graphical stances.

Subject:
Mathematics
Functions
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
05/01/2012
Cave Bear
Conditions of Use:
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Decoding an ancient cave bear. A two-ton, thirteen-foot cave bear, extinct for ten thousand years, has just experienced a rebirth of sorts. From a tooth and a bone, scientists have recovered its entire genetic code.Eddy Rubin, director of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute, says finding genuine cave bear DNA was like looking for a needle in a haystack. The haystack were all the other organisms that were living in the bones and in the tooth of this ancient creature. And the needle was the little bit of the ancient creature's genome DNA, or genes.They used state-of-the-art computer technology to separate the bear genes from the clutter. Jurassic Park fans should note that they can't clone a new cave bear, nor can they recover DNA from creatures as old as the dinosaurs. But they do hope to reconstruct the genetic code of Neanderthals, our closest non-human relatives, to better understand how our own species evolved. This resource contains detailed text description of the research as well as likes for further inquiry.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
08/16/2009
Chronology: the Time of My Life
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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The proper sequence of events must be known when trying to understand the past. In this lesson, students will study chronology and create personal time lines.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
UNC Archaeology
Date Added:
11/01/2001
Classification and Attributes (Archaeology)
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In their study of classification and attributes students will use "doohickey kits" to classify objects based on their attributes and learn that scientists and specifically archaeologists use classification to help answer research questions.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
UNC Archaeology
Date Added:
06/25/1999