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Discover Labyrinths: A Journey in Space and Time
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My submission for the ISKME GoPro Learning Challenge: Draw, build and walk a labyrinth documenting the process in video and photography! Use the experience and images for self-reflection and to inspire others.. .

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Interactive
Author:
Lars Howlett
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Mindful Brainiac Challenge
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In order to introduce some fun, and hopefully get students to practice some of the concepts discussed in class relating to social and emotional intelligence, and mindfulness practices, the Mindful Brainiac Challenge was developed. Students are divided into teams and awarded individual and team points for demonstrating certain behaviors / actions.
Using Class Dojo application, points are awarded from one of the three categories: Cognitive and Metacognitive skills, Social and Emotional Intelligence, and Mindfulness. Teachers collect points from their own observations in class, homework assignments, and reports from students themselves, peers, other teachers and parents. Students are only awarded positive points (so they don't get "punished", and points lead into different milestones that award badges. Throughout the course, different milestones / achievements will receive different rewards, individually and collectively, and by the end of the course, the team with most badges and the individual with most points wins.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Author:
Alice Cardoso
Date Added:
08/08/2016
The New Psychology of Depression
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We live in a world filled with material wealth, live longer and healthier lives, and yet anxiety, stress, unhappiness, and depression have never been more common. What are the driving forces behind these interlinked global epidemics? In this series, Professor Mark Williams (Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow at Oxford University) and Dr Danny Penman discuss the recent scientific advances that have radically altered our understanding of depression and related disorders. Also discussed is the latest treatments and therapies that are offering hope to those suffering from depression. Professor Williams co-developed Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), a treatment for anxiety, stress and depression that is at least as effective as drugs at preventing new episodes of depression. It's now one of the preferred treatments for depression recommended by the UK's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. The same technique, based upon an ancient form of meditation, can also help us cope more effectively with the relentless demands of our increasingly frantic world.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Danny Penman
Mark Williams
Date Added:
11/14/2011
Purposeful Observation
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Welcome to this lesson plan about Purposeful Observation! Our audience is recent college graduates entering the workforce for the first time with full-time jobs. This optional workshop may help to minimize feelings of exhaustion, stress, or anxiousness and build a stronger sense of success and community. This two-hour lesson plan incorporates two different instructional strategies in addition to universal design for learning.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Joanne Shipman
Date Added:
09/30/2019
Sensory Space Design: Framing Awareness
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In this space planning module we are going to explore taking our open learning environments to the next step beyond technology, to a richer higher level of mindfulness.  It is a step away from the ledge that is catapulting students into robotic mindlessness and a lack of cognitive control.  In our eagerness to connect students with technology we forget the human side of learning.  Our brains function with either a perception-action, bottom-up learning cycle or a more advanced top-down goal, attention setting process. “The perception-action cycle is fed by sensory inputs from the environment—sights, sounds, smells, and tactile sensations, whose signals enter the brain via an expansive web or specialized nerves.” (21 Gazzaley) There has always been a role for our senses to play not only in learning but in survival.  Enriching the sensory environment should be a goal in space design. But our ability to control the perception-action cycle or pause it is critical.  “During this pause, highly evolved neural processes that underlie our goal-setting abilities come into play, the executive functions.  These abilities of evaluation, decision making, organization, and planning disrupt the automaticity of the cycle and influence both perception and actions via associations, reflections, expectations and emotional weighting.  This synthesis is the true pinnacle of the human mind, the creation of high level goals.” (23 Gazzaley)  Creating a space for students to use all their sensory perceptions should be filled with energy.  They are the spaces we have been designing in recent course modules.  Now we should ask does that environment also encourage a pause; allow the individual to focus, be mindful of themselves, and learn cognitive control?We will start by looking at the scope of information and environmental overload,” the clutter”,  we have dropped learners into in our schools.  When technology came into libraries very little was taken out.  As technology has expanded expeditiously, libraries hesitate to remove aging equipment or under used print resources allowing the environment to become dense, difficult to navigate, simply cluttered.   Excessive clutter impends cognitive control and our ability to focus on finishing a goal. Before you can see the potential of a new library space we have to de-clutter, remove what is not contributing to student learning every day, and open the space to possibilities.  The environment can be a partner in learning, but first obsolete elements, not contributing to K-12 learners, need to be removed. In Adam Gazzaley and Larry Rosen’s research driven book, The Distracted Mind, they explore neutral processing and how easily young minds become addicted to distractions, especially when using digital devices while rapidly scanning through text, graphics, images and auditory sounds.  …three out of four K-12 teachers asserted that student use of entertainment media (including communication tools such as social media) has hurt students’ attention spans a lot or somewhat, 87 percent of teachers reported that the use of technologies is creating “an easily distracted generation with short attention spans” and 64 percent felt that “digital media do more to distract students than to help them academically”. (145, Gazzaley, Rosen)  The question now becomes: Have we introduced technology too pervasively without understanding its neurological side effects to developing minds?   Are our learning environments become a noisy distraction and if so how do we create more balance? We will look at design elements that can be added into the environment to shift attention back to sensory awareness and reflection. The inclusion of sensory design elements, like nature can add richness and focus to learning.  Contemporary learning environments should support active, collaborative learning but also invite quiet, reflection.  A “whole person” is coming into our schools and our learning spaces need to support that “wholeness.”  The next evolution of educational space planning, specially libraries, should focus on linking the physical, neurological and emotional well being of the learner.  We have designed educational spaces for pedagogy, for efficiency, for all the traditional educational tools and for all the new digital tools.  Now it is time to focus on the whole user and our need to encourage innovative thinkers through matching innovative environments.  Ellen J. Langer”s argues that “behavior depends on context.”  If we want students to be creative,  innovative thinkers we should pay more attention to the “context” through which they are learning.  This includes the tools and the pedagogy of their learning but also the environment.   We will explore Langer's concept of “sideways learning” which includes openness to novelty, alertness to distinction, sensitivity to different contexts, implicit, if not explicit, awareness of multiple perspectives and orientation in the present.  Being mindful of the present, moving beyond the comfortable categories of our past and what those two concepts mean for space planning.  

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Margaret Sullivan
Date Added:
07/19/2017