Social Science Textbooks and Full Courses

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Social Science Textbooks and Full Courses Collection Resources (637)

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21st Century American Government and Politics  v.1.0
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Textbook focusing on American Government and the specificities of the American political system. In covering American government and politics, this text:
• introduces the intricacies of the Constitution, the complexities of federalism, the meanings of civil liberties, and the conflicts over civil rights;
• explains how people are socialized to politics, acquire and express opinions, and participate in political life;
• describes interest groups, political parties, and elections—the intermediaries that link people to government and politics;
• details the branches of government and how they operate; and
• shows how policies are made and affect people’s lives.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
David L. Paletz
Diana Owen
Timothy E. Cook
AIDS and Poverty in Africa, Spring 2005
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This is a discussion-based interactive seminar on the two major issues that affect Sub-Saharan Africa: HIV/AIDS and Poverty. AIDS and Poverty, seemingly different concepts, are more inter-related to each other in Africa than in any other continent. As MIT students, we feel it is important to engage ourselves in a dynamic discussion on the relation between the two - how to fight one and how to solve the other.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bobbili, Raja
Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab Executive Training: Evaluating Social Programs 2011, Spring 2011
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This five-day program on evaluating social programs will provide a thorough understanding of randomized evaluations and pragmatic step-by-step training for conducting one's own evaluation. While the course focuses on randomized evaluations, many of the topics, such as measuring outcomes and dealing with threats to the validity of an evaluation, are relevant for other methodologies. About the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab J-PAL's goal is to reduce poverty by ensuring that policy is based on scientific evidence. Every day, evidence generated by J-PAL researchers is influencing policy and improving lives, sometimes very directly - for example through the scale-up of effective programs- but also in less direct but equally important ways. To date, our evidence has helped improve the lives of at least 30 million people around the world through the scale-up of highly effective policies and programs. By 2013, J-PAL aims to have positively impacted 100 million lives.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Banerjee, Abhijit
Duflo, Esther
Glennerster, Rachel
Abnormal Behavior
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This course will help to define abnormal and normal behaviors and to group these abnormal phenomena into 'disorders.' It will cover the basic concepts surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of abnormal psychological phenomena. The student will investigate the characteristics, epidemiology, controversy, and treatment of individual disorders. The student will begin by defining normal versus abnormal behavior and reviewing the historical context in which abnormal psychology emerged, then discuss the major theories or paradigms associated with abnormal psychology, the classification system used to differentiate and define disorders, and the research methods often utilized in the study of abnormal psychology. Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: describe the historical context from which the current conceptualization of abnormal psychology has evolved; identify and describe the main theoretical perspectives/paradigms which have influenced the field of abnormal psychology; identify and differentiate the classification of psychological disorders; evaluate treatment approaches; explain the major research findings for each group of disorders and how they add to our knowledge of the causes and treatment of psychological disorders. (Psychology 401)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Abnormal Language, Fall 2004
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Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain.

Subject:
Linguistics
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hirsch, Christopher
Wexler, Kenneth
Abnormal Psychology: An e-text!
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This wiki is an ongoing collaboration between Dr. Caleb Lack and students at the University of Central Oklahoma and Arkansas Tech University. So far, over 300 students have spent eight semesters and thousands of hours in contributing to this wiki. The purpose of this wiki is to offer an alternative to the often quite expensive textbooks used in most undergraduate abnormal psychology courses by creating a user-driven, interactive online text. The wiki covers a larger number of topics than traditional texts, allowing professors and students to focus on their own interests.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikispaces
Author:
Caleb Lack
Abnormal Psychology Course LibGuide
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This LibGuide was designed to accompany a community college course in Abnormal Psychology. It contains original material created by the instructor (Mind Maps and Focus Questions), as well as supporting readings gathered from other open sources and some links to freely available copyrighted material. Institutions with a subscription to the LibGuides platform may want to make a copy so they can adapt it to local needs and control the content.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Reading
Provider:
Northwestern Michigan College
Advanced Animal Behavior, Spring 2000
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Reviews selected issues including learning, cognition, perception, foraging and feeding, migration and navigation, defense, and social activities including conflict, collaboration, courtship and reproduction, and communication. The interacting contributions of environment and heredity are examined and the approaches of psychology, ethology, and ecology to this area of study are treated. The relation of human behavior patterns to those of nonhuman animals is explored. Additional readings and a paper are required for graduate credit.

Subject:
Biology
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Schneider, Gerald
Advanced Contract Theory, Spring 2005
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Recent developments in contract theory. Includes advanced models of moral hazard, adverse selection, mechanism design and incomplete contracts with applications to theory of the firm, organizational design, and financial structure.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Izmalkov, Sergei
Advanced Macroeconomics I, Fall 2012
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This course is an advanced course in macroeconomics that seeks to bring students to the research frontier. The course is divided into two sections. The first half is taught by Prof. Iv‡n Werning and covers topics such as how to formulate and solve optimal problems. Students will study fiscal and monetary policy, among other issues. The second half, taught by Prof. George-Marios Angeletos, covers recent work on multiple equilibria, global games, and informational fictions.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
George-Marios Angeletos
Ivˆn Werning
Advanced Macroeconomics II, Spring 2007
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Topics change from year to year. Most recent topics include: optimal fiscal and monetary policy; optimal capital taxation; time inconsistency and incentive incompatibility of optimal policies; redistribution and political economics; heterogeneous agents and incomplete markets; Real Business Cycle models and new-keynesian models; endogenous growth; aggregate fluctuations and propagation mechanisms; recursive methods and robust control in macro.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lorenzoni, Guido
Advanced Natural Language Processing, Fall 2005
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This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subject:
Computer Science
Linguistics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Barzilay, Regina
Collins, Michael
Advanced Phonology, Spring 2005
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This course focuses on phonological phenomena that are sensitive to morphological structure, including base-reduplicant identity, cyclicity, level ordering, derived environment effects, opaque rule interactions, and morpheme structure constraints. In the recent OT literature, it has been claimed that all of these phenomena can be analyzed with a single theoretical device: correspondence constraints, which regulate the similarity of lexically related forms (such as input and output, base and derivative, base and reduplicant).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Linguistics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Albright, Adam
Steriade, Donca
Advanced Workshop in Writing for Social Sciences and Architecture (ELS), Spring 2007
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Advanced subject focusing on techniques, format, and prose style used in academic and professional life. Emphasis on writing as required in fields such as economics, political science, and architecture. Short assignments include: business letters, memos, and proposals that lead toward a written term project. Methods designed to deal with the special problems of those whose first language is not English. Successful completion satisfies Phase II of the Writing Requirement. This workshop is designed to help you write clearly, accurately and effectively in both an academic and a professional environment. In class, we analyze various forms of writing and address problems common to advanced speakers of English. We will often read one another's work.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brennecke, Patricia W.
Advances in International Relations Theory, Spring 2003
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Critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a core of concepts and content. Comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. Discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Choucri, Nazli
Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Feelings, Spring 2013
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This course studies the relations of affect to cognition and behavior, feeling to thinking and acting, and values to beliefs and practices. These connections will be considered at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.

Subject:
Biology
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Chorover, Stephan
Affective Priming at Short and Extremely Short Exposures, Spring 2003
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This course is an investigation of affective priming and creation of rigorously counterbalanced, fully computerized testing paradigm. Includes background readings, study design, counterbalancing, study execution, data analysis, presentation of poster, and final paper.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Corkin, Suzanne
African Politics
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This course will provide the student with a broad overview of African politics placed within the context of Africa's recent history, taking into account Africa's colonial relationships and then the post-colonial period. This course will analyze on the internal workings and challenges of African states, including their movements towards democratization, their economic statuses, the connections between their governmental and non-governmental institutions/organizations, and the various ways in which their societies and cultures impact their politics. This course also asks questions about the nature of Africa's conflicts, reviewing larger trends within Africa's political economy, and inquiring about the promise of continental and sub-continental political integration efforts. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how colonialism and independence movements contributed to and shaped contemporary African statehood; identify the main causes of state and political failure in Africa; define underdevelopment and explain the causes of economic failure in Africa; discuss the causes of civil and interstate conflict in Africa; apply knowledge of Africa's history to explain current causes of crisis and the roles of different actors within the state and international community; compare and contrast economically and politically stable states with those that are unstable and identify the main features of stability; identify and explain some of the major social, cultural, and economic challenges (such as HIV/AIDS) that contemporary African states face, as well as the role international actors play in addressing these challenges. (Political Science 325)

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Alternative Microeconomics/Basic Microeconomics
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From a technical perspective, economics is the study of how various alternatives or choices are evaluated to best achieve a given objective. The domain of economics is the study of processes by which scarce resources are allocated to satisfy unlimited wants. Ideally, the resources are allocated to their highest valued uses. Supply, demand, preferences, costs, benefits, production relationships and exchange are tools that are used to describe and analyze the market processes by which individuals allocate scarce resources to satisfy as many wants as possible. This increasingly narrow focus is the domain of modern, “neoclassical,” microeconomic analysis. This approach is typical of most economists and is referred to as orthodox economics.

The five basic questions that are asked in the study of the allocation problem are: 1) What to produce? 2) How many to produce? 3) How to produce? 4) When to produce? 5) Who gets it? Provisioning should seek to understand the nature of wants or objectives. Provisioning is the process of framing the approaches to the allocation problem.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Boise State University
American Consumer Culture, Fall 2007
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This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the ‰ŰĎgood life‰Ű through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Marketing
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jacobs, Meg