Arts and Humanities Textbooks and Full Courses

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Arts and Humanities Textbooks and Full Courses Collection Resources (389)

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20th Century Art
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Examination of the cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in Europe and the United States, surveying the artwork of Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Pop Art, and Op-Art, and Modern and Postmodern architecture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011
Acceso
Rating

Acceso is a complete, interactive curriculum for intermediate-level learners of Spanish. The materials on the site are provided freely to the public and are intended as a replacement for commercial textbooks, which are generally ill-suited to the learning outcomes now considered crucial to successful language study. These materials are supplemented by an online workbook built on the MySpanishLab platform of Pearson Education, Inc., as well as detailed lesson plans, rubrics for the evaluation of student work, and reliable instruments for measuring student progress and learning outcomes.Winner of 2012 Computer Assisted Language Consortium (CALICO) Focus AwardReviewed in:CALICO Journal 29.2 (Jan 2012): 398-405.Hispania 95.2 (June 2012): 365-366

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
University of Kansas
Author:
Amy Rossomondo et al.
Date Added:
08/31/2012
Acceso
Rating

The University of Kansas Collaborative Digital Spanish Project (Acceso) is an open-access, digital learning environment designed to promote the acquisition of Spanish and the development of cultural understanding of the varied groups of people who share Spanish as a common language.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Amy E. Rossomondo
Date Added:
07/24/2017
Advanced Artificial Intelligence
Conditions of Use:
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This course will present advanced topics in Artificial Intelligence (AI), including inquiries into logic, artificial neural network and machine learning, and the Turing machine. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define the term 'intelligent agent,' list major problems in AI, and identify the major approaches to AI; translate problems into graphs and encode the procedures that search the solutions with the graph data structures; explain the differences between various types of logic and basic statistical tools used in AI; list the different types of learning algorithms and explain why they are different; list the most common methods of statistical learning and classification and explain the basic differences between them; describe the components of Turing machine; name the most important propositions in the philosophy of AI; list the major issues pertaining to the creation of machine consciousness; design a reasonable software agent with java code. (Computer Science 408)

Subject:
Computer Science
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Advanced Japanese I, Fall 2005
Conditions of Use:
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Systematic development of reading, writing, and oral communication skills. Introduction to advanced grammar that deepens the understanding of Japanese culture and society through reading and discussion. Lab work required. This course covers lessons 22 through 27 of Japanese: The Spoken Language by Eleanor H. Jordan with Mari Noda. The goal of the course is to continue to build oral proficiency by expanding your knowledge of vocabulary and grammar. Class hours will be devoted to developing speaking skills in a variety of circumstances; making requests, invitations, apologies, suggestions, dealing with problems, expressing your opinions, etc. Grammatical and social appropriateness on your utterances will be stressed. Keep in mind that daily tape-work is essential.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Nagatomi, Ayumi
Nagaya, Yoshimi
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Advanced Speaking and Critical Listening Skills (ELS), Spring 2007
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For advanced students who wish to build confidence and skills in spoken English. Focuses on the appropriate oral presentation of material in a variety of professional contexts: group discussions, classroom explanations and interactions, and theses/research proposals. Valuable for those who intend to teach or lecture in English. Includes language laboratory assignments. The goal of the workshop is to develop effective speaking and listening skills for academic and professional contexts.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dunphy, Jane
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Advanced Topics: Plotting Terror in European Culture, Spring 2004
Conditions of Use:
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This interdisciplinary course surveys modern European culture to disclose the alignment of literature, opposition, and revolution. Reaching back to the foundational representations of anarchism in nineteenth-century Europe (Kleist, Conrad) the curriculum extends through the literary and media representations of militant organizations in the 1970s and 80s (Italy's Red Brigade, Germany's Red Army Faction, and the Real Irish Republican Army). In the middle of the term students will have the opportunity to hear a lecture by Margarethe von Trotta, one of the most important filmmakers who has worked on terrorism. The course concludes with a critical examination of the ways that certain segments of European popular media have returned to the "radical chic" that many perceive to have exhausted itself more than two decades ago.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Scribner, Charity
Date Added:
01/01/2004
African-American Literature
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course considers the impact of storytelling and spirituals on the literary production of African American authors from the Colonial period to the current day, examining the cultural, historical, and political contexts of the literature, as well as how the issues of gender, race, and class affect the production and meaning of these works. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the cultural influences and the development of African American literature; analyze the evolution of African American literature from an oral to a literary tradition; define the functions of African American literature from its inception in the period of slavery to the contemporary period; identify the major authors and/or literary works in the various literary periods and movements (Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism, and modernism; Black Arts; and the Contemporary Period). This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 411)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
African Art
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the art and architecture of Africa from a Western art historical perspective. This course will emphasize the role of art as manifested in the lifestyles, spiritualities, and philosophies of particular African societies, while also broaching aesthetic principles and the study and display of African art. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of transitions in the national geography of the African continent from the 17th century to the present; demonstrate an understanding of the ethnic diversity and distinct cultural traditions among people of Africa; identify and discuss materials and techniques employed in the creation of a range of African artistic and architectural works; discuss the functions and meanings of a range of African art forms; identify traditional styles and forms strongly associated with particular cultural groups. (Art History 304)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011
The Age of Reason: Europe from the 17th to the Early 19th Centuries, Spring 2011
Conditions of Use:
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This course asks students to consider the ways in which social theorists, institutional reformers, and political revolutionaries in the 17th through 19th centuries seized upon insights developed in the natural sciences and mathematics to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Students study trials, art, literature and music to understand developments in Europe and its colonies in these two centuries. Covers works by Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, and Darwin.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ravel, Jeffrey S.
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Al-Kitaab Supplement (Review)
Rating

This book is meant as a grammar supplement to the Al-Kitaab series. It has some dialogues of its own which can be accessed for free via the website located at the back of the book or via a CD available for purchase. It also includes lines for taking notes and for completing the exercises. This book was created in response to frustrations with working with the Al-Kitaab series and is not meant to stand alone; rather, it is meant to work side by side with Alif Baa and Al-Kitaab: Part One.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Textbook
Author:
CLASSRoad Admin
Date Added:
01/28/2016
All The Arabic You Never Learned The First Time Around
Rating

This book is intended for those who have already learned to read Arabic but are still struggling with the basics of Arabic grammar. The book moves from the very simple to the very complex, and includes examples and exercises in each chapter to reinforce learning. The key to the exercises is found in the back of the book. The book is difficult to find, as it was published at the Defense Language Institute. A free non-searchable PDF version is available through this site, and a searchable PDF is also available for purchase.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Defense Language Institute - Foreign Language Center
Author:
James Price
Date Added:
09/12/2013
America in Depression and War, Spring 2012
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This course focuses on the Great Depression and World War II and how they led to a major reordering of American politics and society. We will examine how ordinary people experienced these crises and how those experiences changed their outlook on politics and the world around them.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Meg Jacobs
Date Added:
01/01/2012
American Art
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century. The student will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity. Overarching issues that have interested major scholars of American art and its purview include the landscape (wilderness, Manifest Destiny, rural settlement, and urban development); the family and gender roles; the founding rhetoric of freedom and antebellum slavery; and notions of artistic modernism through the 20th century. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Understand the historical (geographic, political) formation of the present United States of America; Be familiar with renowned influential American artists from the 18th through the 20th century; Be conversant in common stylistic designations used in Western art of the 17th through 20th centuries; Recognize subjects and forms in American art through history that mark its distinction; Be able to engage specific images, objects, and structures from different critical perspectives to consider their functions and meanings. (Art History 210)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011
American Authors: American Women Authors, Spring 2003
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Examines in detail the works of several American authors. Through close readings of poetry, novels, or plays, subject addresses such issues as literary influence, cultural diversity, and the writer's career. Topic: American Women Authors. This subject, crosslisted in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, poverty, and working conditions for women (Fern, Davis, Wharton); captivity and slavery (Rowlandson, Jacobs); class struggle (Fern, Davis, Wharton, Larsen); race and identity (Keller, Jacobs, Larsen, Morrison); feminist revisions of history (Stowe, Morrison, Keller); and the myth of the fallen woman (take your pick). Essays and inclass reports will focus more particularly on specific writers and themes and will stress the skills of close reading, annotation, research, and uses of multimedia where appropriate. A classroom electronic archive has been developed for this course and will be available as a resource for images and other media materials.

Subject:
Literature
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley
Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2003
American History to 1865, Fall 2010
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2010
American Literature I
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This course is a survey of American Literature from 1650 through 1820. It covers Early American and Puritan Literature, Enlightenment Literature, and Romantic Literature. It teaches in the context of American History and introduces the student to literary criticism and research.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
08/18/2016
American Literature I (ENGL 246)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this class we will practice skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about fiction, poetry and drama from a select sampling of 20th Century American Literature. Through class discussion, close reading, and extensive writing practice, this course seeks to develop critical and analytical skills, preparing students for more advanced academic work.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
American Literature, Spring 2013
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger, Spring 2013
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wyn Kelley
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The American Renaissance
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_American Renaissance,ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ a period of tremendous literary activity that took place in America between the 1830s and 1860s represents the cultivation of a distinctively American literature. The student will begin this course by looking at what it was in American culture and society that led to the dramatic outburst of literary creativity in this era. The student will then explore some of the periodĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s most famous works, attempting to define the emerging American identity represented in this literature. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discriminate among the key economic, technological, social, and cultural transformations underpinning the American Renaissance; define the transformations in American Protestantism exemplified by the second Great Awakening and transcendentalism; list the key tenets of transcendentalism and relate them to romanticism more broadly and to social and cultural developments in the antebellum United States; analyze EmersonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s place in defining transcendentalism and his key differences from other transcendentalists; analyze competing conceptualizations of poetry and its construction and purpose, with particular attention to Poe, Emerson, and Whitman; define the formal innovations of Dickinson and their relationship to her central themes; describe the emergence of the short story as a form, with reference to specific stories by Hawthorne and Poe; distinguish among forms of the novel, with reference to specific works by Hawthorne, Thompson, and Fern; analyze the ways that writers such as Melville, Brownson, Davis, and Thoreau saw industrialization and capitalism as a threat to U. S. society; develop the relationship between ThoreauĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s interest in nature and his political commitments and compare and contrast his thinking with Emerson and other transcendentalists; analyze the different ways that sentimentalism constrained and empowered women writers to critique gender conventions, with reference to specific works by writers such as Fern, Alcott, and Stowe; define the ways that the slavery question influenced major texts and major controversies over literature during this period. This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 405)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
American Sign Language I (ASL 121)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

ASL I is an introduction to the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
American Sign Language II (ASL 122)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

ASL II is a sequential course following ASL I, which continues to build knowledge of the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to continue to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
American Sign Language III (ASL 123)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

ASL III is the third quarter of the first year study of American Sign Language (ASL) and the people who use it. ASL III will enhance the use of ASL grammar and consist of concentrated efforts to develop the studentęs expressive and receptive skills. The course will continue to provide insights into Deaf Cultural values, attitudes and the Deaf community. Now learning more abstract concepts of the language, ASL III students will be able to: narrate events that occurred in the past, ask for solutions to everyday problems, tell about life events, and describe objects. Students will also be able to: demonstrate intermediate finger spelling competency, generate complex ASL structures with intermediate vocabulary knowledge, execute a wide variety of grammatical principles, including classifiers and inflections, adapt to different sign language registers, dialects and accents, and create opportunities to interact with members of the Deaf community.

Subject:
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
American Urban History II, Fall 2011
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Robert Fogelson
Date Added:
01/01/2011
American Urban History I, Spring 2010
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fogelson, Robert
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Ancient Civilizations of the World
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
04/23/2013
Animation Model
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

***LOGIN REQUIRED*** This instructional program prepares students to use artistic and technological foundations to create animated presentations for industry and entertainment. Students will develop basic drawing and design skills, learn the fundamentals and physics movement, the concept of communication to a given audience, and techniques for self-expression through a variety of animated formats. They will explore the careers and requisite skills required by animators in both entertainment and the business world.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Butte County Office of Education
Provider Set:
CTE Online
Date Added:
07/15/2013
Approaching Shakespeare Lecture Series
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Each lecture in this series focuses on a single play by Shakespeare, and employs a range of different approaches to try to understand a central critical question about it. Rather than providing overarching readings or interpretations, the series aims to show the variety of different ways we might understand Shakespeare, the kinds of evidence that might be used to strengthen our critical analysis, and, above all, the enjoyable and unavoidable fact that Shakespeare's plays tend to generate our questions rather than answer them.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Emma Smith
Date Added:
01/06/2013
Arabic Grammar of the Written Language (PDF)
Rating

First published in 1910, this book focuses exclusively on the grammar of Modern Standard Arabic as it is used in written Arabic. It contains an introduction that explains the Arabic alphabet and pronunciation and 49 lessons that describe the foundational grammatical elements of MSA, including articles, gender, and the noun and verb systems. The text includes Arabic-English and English-Arabic vocabulary sections as well as a supplement with extract from the Qur'an, classical literature, media, and correspondence. The filesize of the PDF is 32 MB.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Julius Groos
Author:
Ernst Harder
Griffithes Wheeler Thatcher
Date Added:
10/14/2013
Arabic I
Conditions of Use:
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This is a textbook for beginning Arabic language learning. The textbook is divided into twelve lessons. Each lesson focuses on an activity and common theme to introduce the basics of Arabic. Each lesson starts with a short video, which you'll be asked to watch. To help you understand the video, each lesson also includes a transcript (in English), a list of vocabulary (with audio clips), and language and grammar notes.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Date Added:
06/04/2012
Argument Diagramming
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This course provides an introduction to exploring and understanding arguments by explaining what the parts of an argument are, and how to break arguments into their parts and create diagrams to show how those parts relate to each other.

Argument diagramming is a great visual tool for evaluating claims that people make. By the end of the course, you will be able to think critically about arguments or claims and determine whether or not they are logical. This skill can be used in a variety of situations, such as listening to the news, reading an article, or making a point in a meeting.

This is an introductory course and may be useful to a broad range of students. Topics covered include: Creating Argument Diagrams, Evaluating Arguments, and Argument Diagramming for Interpreting Public Arguments and Longer Texts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Linguistics
Material Type:
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Reading
Provider:
Carnegie Mellon University
Provider Set:
Open Learning Initiative
Date Added:
08/01/2011
The Argumentative Research Project: A Step-by-Step Course
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This resource is designed to walk students through the process of completing a research project in any field of study. It covers the earliest stages of brainstorming and discussing, continues through researching and compiling sources; writing, documenting, revising, and polishing a paper; and finally presenting the research topic to a wider audience in a professional manner. The focus is on MLA format, though the course could be modified for other formats.

The first unit is an introduction to the project. It asks students to draw on knowledge of issues affecting their own community and world to help generate discussion that could eventually lead to a research topic.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Social Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Sara Layton
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Art Appreciation
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This course is particularly focused on helping you develop visual literacy skills, but all the college courses you take are to some degree about information literacy. Visual literacy is really just a specialized type of information literacy. The skills you acquire in this course will help you become an effective researcher in other fields, as well.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
03/31/2016
Art Appreciation and Techniques
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative processes and thought. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: interpret examples of visual art using a five-step critical process that includes description, analysis, context, meaning, and judgment; identify and describe the elements and principles of art; use analytical skills to connect formal attributes of art with their meaning and expression; explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and other world cultures; articulate the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic themes and issues that artists examine in their work; identify the processes and materials involved in art and architectural production; utilize information to locate, evaluate, and communicate information about visual art in its various forms. Note that this course is an alternative to the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ARTH101A and has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Art History 101B)

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
Art Historical Methodologies
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course is an introduction to the major methodologies used by art historians. Although not a history of art history per se, it is organized in a roughly chronological order that traces major methodological developments within the discipline from the birth of art history in the nineteenth century through the late twentieth century. The course will also examine how artworks are displayed in modern art museums. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain what art historians study and what kinds of questions they ask about works of art; Identify major art historical methodologies and their associated theories and theorists; Write a critical summary of a piece of art historical scholarship; Explain the major aspects of the methodological approaches outlined in this course and how they relate to the philosophical, historical, and social context in which they first appeared; Explain how different methodologies can be used to analyze works of art; Compare and contrast major art historical methodologies; Use different art historical approaches to interpret, analyze, and write about works of art. (Art History 301)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011