Search Results (26)

View
Selected filters:
  • Plagiarism
Avoiding Plagiarism
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

We know you have come to this tutorial because you are a serious writer who wants to write well — and correctly! You have probably heard the word plagiarism and would like to understand it better. You have come to the right place. In this tutorial, you’ll learn:

What plagiarism is
How to recognize seven different kinds of plagiarism
The correct way to use ‘open access’ materials
The consequences of plagiarism
How to avoid plagiarism by doing the following:
Citing sources correctly
Recognizing ‘common knowledge’
Writing good paraphrases
Writing good summaries
Taking careful notes

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Excelsior College
Provider Set:
Excelsior College Online Writing Lab
Date Added:
11/06/2018
Avoiding Plagiarism Tutorial
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Plagiarism is presenting someone else's work as your own. It can include copying and pasting text from a website into a project that you're working on, or taking an idea from a book without including a citation to give credit to the book's author. Plagiarism is very common, and the internet has made it even more common. However, if you are careful to cite your sources, it's not too hard to avoid plagiarism.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Provider:
Goodwill Community Foundation, Inc.
Provider Set:
GCFLearnFree
Date Added:
07/19/2013
Avoiding Plagiarism Tutorial
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This interactive learning module teaches students how to avoid plagiarism. Upon completing this module, students will understand the definition of plagiarism as well as what and when to cite. Adapted from Clark College's IRIS Avoid Plagiarism tutorial.

Subject:
Higher Education
Material Type:
Assessment
Interactive
Lesson
Module
Provider:
Manchester Community College
Date Added:
05/04/2018
Biology
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
08/22/2012
Biology, The Chemistry of Life, The Study of Life, The Science of Biology
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Identify the shared characteristics of the natural sciencesSummarize the steps of the scientific methodCompare inductive reasoning with deductive reasoningDescribe the goals of basic science and applied science

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Remix
Biology, The Chemistry of Life, The Study of Life, The Science of Biology
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Identify the shared characteristics of the natural sciencesSummarize the steps of the scientific methodCompare inductive reasoning with deductive reasoningDescribe the goals of basic science and applied science

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
Tina B. Jones
Dealing with Plagiarism: A Guide for Teaching Assistants
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This interactive presentation helps teaching assistants understand what plagiarism is; why it occurs; and offers advice on how to detect, investigate, and report it when it does. Additional topics include special circumstances, plagiarism prevention, and legal information regarding plagiarism and plagiarists. The unit closes by sharing information about the weaknesses of current plagiarism technology and how one can use it more effectively.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Lecture
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Florida Institute of Technology
Provider Set:
BBST Testing Course
Author:
Cem Kaner
Rebecca Fiedler
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Engineering Communication
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this course, the student will learn several aspects of effective technical communication that will lay a foundation for successful work on an engineering team. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Define the purpose of effective technical communication; List attributes of effective technical communication; Assess audience and context, as well as identify appropriate genres for technical communication; Choose appropriate grammar, style, and organization for documents; Define and avoid plagiarism and implement appropriate citations; Brainstorm and prepare and revise documents independently and collaboratively; Organize and present information in written, visual, and oral modes in compliance with standard formats. (Mechanical Engineering 304)

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Get the Word Out at McDonalds!
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students take part in a hypothetical scenario that challenges them to inform customers at a local restaurant of how their use and disposal of plastics relates/contributes to the Great Pacific garbage patch (GPGP). What students ultimately do is research information on the plastics pollution in the oceans and present that information as a short, eye-catching newsletter suitable to hand out to restaurant customers. This activity focuses on teaching students to conduct their own research on a science-technology related topic and present it in a compelling manner that includes citing source information without plagiarism. By doing this, students gain experience and skills with general online searching as well as word processing and written and visual communication.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Andrey Koptelov
Nathan Howell
Date Added:
10/14/2015
How to Avoid All Possible Types of Plagiarism in Writing
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Plagiarism definitions are many:When it comes to spoken words, plagiarism means stealing ideas and thoughts of other people to claim them as one's own. Speaking of written words, plagiarism is defined as a lack of original content in a writing piece.Dictionaries call plagiarism "stealing and passing off ideas or words of another as one's own," and "presenting as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source." (Merriam-Webster)Plagiarism is a persistent problem. People do it unknowingly or willingly, and a large percentage of accusations corresponds to the academic world: students plagiarize writings for many reasons, use all possible types of this offensive act, and don't realize all the consequences. What they should try to do is be aware of plagiarism and avoid it in academic writings, citing and referencing their works accordingly.What are plagiarism types?The digital era calls the shots, so today we have many new forms of plagiarism, both intentional and unintentional ones. Academic and journalistic are the general names for plagiarism types, but both involve several variations. They are as follows:Full plagiarismAlso known as "direct" or "complete" plagiarism, this form appears when you copy the content from a source as it is, word for word.Characteristics: no original research, no changes in lexical items or punctuation, no differences (even the tiniest ones) between two content pieces.Full plagiarism is the sin of incompetent authors or those who are mere lazy to give it their best shot and create something original. Speaking of the academic world, full plagiarism leads to a student's expulsion.ParaphrasingSome call it "partial" plagiarism because it happens when a writer takes data from several different sources, combines them with minor changes in language, and represent as original ideas. Paraphrasing itself is not plagiarism, and it's okay to use it if citing and referencing all sources. But it becomes so when represented as a rewrite of the original with no attributions.Characteristics: presenting the ideas from original sources in different forms, changes of sentence structure, active to passive voice manipulations, no cites or references.In the case of paraphrasing, an author takes pains to sound original and yet doesn't provide any first-hand research in his writing. In academia, this form of plagiarism signals about a lack of knowledge on the topic or not enough writing skills to expand ideas.Minimalistic plagiarismIt's a kind of paraphrase too, but a more professional one: a writer copies ideas but changes the flow and order in which they are presented in the source. This form of plagiarism is difficult to detect because it does seem original, especially if checked with plagiarism detection software.Characteristics: changes in sentence structure, statements order, and writing style of the source; paraphrasing several sources in one text with no attributions; active use of synonyms.Minimalistic plagiarism happens when a student lacks time or patience to create original work but is ambitious of recognition and high grades.Mosaic plagiarismAlso known as a poor rewrite, synonymization, or patch writing, mosaic plagiarism happens when an author takes phrases from the original, rearranges them in order, and represent in own work without citing. Or, when he keeps the same sentence structure and meaning but replace every word with synonyms so his work would look like a newly written one.Characteristics: rearrangements in word and phrase order, excessive synonymization, a flow changes, no attribution to sources.Students do love this type of plagiarism, and it's most common in their academic works. Mosaic plagiarism signals about procrastination, lack of knowledge, and ignorance of plagiarism consequences.Accidental plagiarismIn plain English, it's unintentional copying of others' ideas and words. Speaking of students, they might fall into a trap of accidental plagiarism when don't know they borrow concepts from others and, therefore, neglect to reference sources because they do consider their writings original.Despite its accidental nature, this form of plagiarism is considered as copyright infringement and scholar ethics violation. So, the consequences are going to be as ominous as in the case of other plagiarism types.Self-plagiarismThe trickiest one, self-plagiarism occurs when a student decides to submit his previous work to another class. Or, when he takes ideas, concepts, and passages from his other essays and use them for new assignments with no permission from both professors.This form is the most controversial one, and many still argue if they should consider it plagiarism at all. On the one hand, your work is your intellectual property, and so you can use it wherever you want. On the other, this work is no longer original after you've submitted it. It's a kind of bluff: the audience waits for new information from an author, but he misleads them and gives something they've heard already.In the world of academia, it would be wise for students to consult professors on the institution's policies to make sure it's okay to cite papers, previously submitted to other classes.Source plagiarism, or wrong referencingAuthors refer to each other in their works. And when a student refers to a cited source rather than a primary one, it's called source plagiarism.Source formatting matters, either. Improperly cited sources, false referencing, or no references at all are the cases of plagiarism. Reasons for why a student avoids references in a paper vary:He asked a ghostwriter to create an essay, so he just can't refer to it.He used a source to steal arguments and just copied them with no changes.He used the essence of a source and just changed several keywords.He combined several sources in a paper for it to look original.It often happens that a student doesn't know how to use citations and references in his copy. It's not the case of plagiarism, but a professor may consider it so when detecting some misinformation in a list of references. This includes:Using wrong sources (see the above source plagiarism).Neglecting footnotes: a student cites an author but doesn't provide a location of the source.Using fake sources: a student plagiarizes the entire text of his essay and yet provides a long list of references to "prove" its original nature.Proper citation is a must in the academic world, so writers need to know how to use and structure references to avoid accusations of plagiarism. How to avoid plagiarism issues in writings?Plagiarism consequences are many, and most are not as evident as students might think. Copyright infringement and intellectual property theft are legal issues, and they might lead to far stronger effects than poor grades or reputation loss. To avoid them, stop believing all myths about plagiarism in academia and start doing in-depth research on assigned topics. It will allow understanding key concepts and structure a future essay right.Other tips on avoiding plagiarism in writing:Document every source you use. Make sure to format it right: don't forget about quotation marks when citing someone's words.Spare no time on research.When in doubts, ask peers to check your list of references and say if you format it right. The same goes for research: friends might help to find proper sources or recommend some.Never ask anyone to write essays for you: any ghostwriters, any custom services, any downloads from the web.PRO tip: after you completed writing a paper, run it through a pro commercial software that will find unintentional plagiarism in your text.Plagiarism is about ethics and principles. It's not enough to know the definition and consequences of the issue to avoid it. What matters is your determination: stay honest, do research, create original works for more people to learn new ideas, refer to other authors, and remember to mention their names when citing.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Nancy Christinovich
Date Added:
03/26/2018
Plagiarism Tutorial
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This tutorial is designed to challenge your understanding of plagiarism and the ethical use of sources in academic writing. You will see ten samples of source material and ten corresponding examples of student writing. It is up to you to determine if the student has used each source responsibly.

At the end of this exercise, you will be asked to list three best practices for using sources responsibly. These rules and your results can be shared with your professor.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Provider:
Wake Forest University
Author:
Kevin Gilbertson
Kyle Denlinger
Date Added:
01/15/2013
Plagiarism and Academic Integrity
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This module is for lessons on plagiarism and academic integrity. International students learning in the U.S. tend to struggle both with the concept of plagiarism and the proper execution of citations and giving credit to their sources. Therefore, in INTO Mason's graduate transition courses, we spend one or two weeks on the concept of plagiarism and academic integrity with an Academic Integrity Research Paper as the assessment. Created by Steven Harris-Scott, Ph.D., and Amy Lewis, Ed.D., for INTO George Mason University with support from Mason 4-VA. Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

Subject:
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Steven Harris-Scott
Date Added:
09/20/2017
Plagiarism - avoid it at all costs!
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

The audio narrated and interactive tutorial introduces what the concept of plagiarism is. It explains how plagiarism can be recognised and includes real-life examples of the impact of plagiarism inside and outside of academia. Strategies on how and why plagiarism is avoided are covered. The tutorial includes a number of self assessment interspersed throughout. This tutorial was adapted from the "Avoid Plagiarism" tutorial developed by IT Tallaght Library, Dublin, Ireland. This resource was created using Articulate Storyline. The resource contains the source file for the online resource found at: http://www.ucd.ie/library/elearning/plagiarism/story.html

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Interactive
Author:
Jenny Collery
Date Added:
01/28/2016
SimilaritySim
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

A no-tech card game designed to give learners an insight into how assessors and examiners use Turnitin's originality checking service to identify potential plagiarism.The game uses two decks of cards.  The first simulates the decision making process, presenting a series of extracts from Turnitin reports and asking students to judge whether they show examples of plagiarism or not.  These are then compared to a model answer (which is open to debate - many of the examples are borderline) and students asked to reflect on and challenge any disagreement.The second deck of cards is introduced, these show descriptions which match up to the first deck, and provide a competitive element as groups compete to solve a word puzzle by correctly matching the pairs of cards.  This emphasises how nuanced the inferences that can be drawn from the report are.Uses of the resourceSimilaritySim can be used in several ways.Teaching how to understand Turnitin reportsWhere learners are given access to reports on their own work, this activity can be used as part of a session introducing them to how the reports are interpreted, and how to avoid common mistakes (eg paying too much attention to the % score).It can also be valuable in staff development sessions, to train staff who will be interpreting the reports in a scaffolded way that can be more engaging than simply showing examples on a screen.Academic integrity trainingSimilaritySim can be used to show students the range of types of unoriginal work which Turnitin can detect, which can help them to understand the difference between switching out a couple of words and proper paraphrasing.  (Although care should be taken the importance of not plagiarising, rather than merely beating Turnitin).Reducing anxietySome learners are quite nervous about submitting high stakes work to Turnitin, mainly due to misunderstanding the way in which Turnitin is used.  This activity shows them that their assessor will need to spend considerable time working with the report, rather than it being a "computer says no" scenario.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Steve Bentley
Date Added:
12/02/2016
Study skills for politics students
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This dictionary arose from the Higher Education Academy-funded Collaborative Teaching Development Grant ‘Closing the Loop: Bridging the Gap between Provision and Implementation of Feedback’. While the original project was aimed at the markers providing feedback, the dictionary is the result of the realisation that students need to be able to access the resources directly themselves.

This style and referencing guide aims to address these questions and more besides. We hope that after reading it you will have a good sense of what we are looking for in your written work, but if anything remains unclear after reading this, don’t hesitate to ask your personal tutor or subject tutors for further information. If you think key information has been omitted, is unclear, or is contradictory, please bring this to our attention! We can’t fix it if we don’t know it’s broken.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Helen Williams
Date Added:
01/26/2017