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Acid Stomach
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This Science NetLinks lesson is intended for a high-school, introductory chemistry class or health class. The lesson begins with an article on the history of the development of aspirin. Students will then complete a lab that compares the reaction of regular aspirin, buffered aspirin, and enteric aspirin in neutral, acidic, and basic solutions. They will then analyze the results of the experiment to gain insight into how this information was used by researchers to solve some of the problems associated with aspirin. To complete the lesson, students must understand acids and bases.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
08/08/2007
The Allergy Chronicles
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The purpose of this lesson, from Science NetLinks, is to use the Internet to explore how the immune system functions in a variety of allergic reactions. In middle school, students should have had experiences studying the healthy functioning of the human body. In high school, students should relate their knowledge of normal body functioning to situations in which functioning is impaired due to environmental or hereditary causes. Also at this level, students should try to find explanations for diseases in physiological, molecular, or system terms. Since the primary purpose of this lesson is to explore the role of immune responses in allergic reactions, students should already have a working knowledge of body systems, and the immune system in particular.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
05/05/2006
Anatomy & Physiology
Conditions of Use:
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You probably have a general understanding of how your body works. But do you fully comprehend how all of the intricate functions and systems of the human body work together to keep you healthy? This course will provide that insight. By approaching the study of the body in an organized way, you will be able to connect what you learn about anatomy and physiology to what you already know about your own body.

By taking this course, you will begin to think and speak in the language of the domain while integrating the knowledge you gain about anatomy to support explanations of physiological phenomenon. The course focuses on a few themes that, when taken together, provide a full view of what the human body is capable of and of the exciting processes going on inside of it.

Topics covered include: Structure and Function, Homeostasis, Levels of Organization, and Integration of Systems.

Note: This free course requires registration

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Carnegie Mellon University
Provider Set:
Open Learning Initiative
Date Added:
01/07/2013
Bear Bones
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An estimated ten million Americans have osteoporosis, an age-related disease in which the bones gradually become brittle and weak. Now, scientists are looking to animals for clues on how to combat this condition. This resource describes the study of sustaining bone strength of hibernating bears.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
03/08/2008
Big Heads
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If somebody is really smart, other people might say: "She's got a really big brain." But when it comes to brains, does size really matter? In this Science Update, you'll hear the complicated answer to that simple question.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
04/08/2007
Blood: The Stuff of Life
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The purpose of this lesson is to teach students about blood and its components while instilling an appreciation of its importance for survival. The lesson takes a step-by-step approach to determining the recipe for blood while introducing students to important laboratory techniques like centrifugation and microscopy, as well as some diseases of cell types found in blood. It also highlights the importance of donating blood by explaining basic physiological concepts and the blood donation procedure.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Melis Anahtar
Date Added:
10/31/2014
Born for Strokes
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When a pregnant woman doesn't take care of herself, you might expect her baby to suffer from birth defects or childhood illnesses. But what happens when her baby grows up? In this Science Update, you'll hear about a recent study that suggests that malnutrition in the womb can come back to haunt you well into adulthood.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
08/19/2007
The Busy Brain
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The purpose of this lesson, from Science NetLinks, is to understand how the brain receives and sends signals to the body. Until third grade, children view organs of the body as individual parts, e.g. the eyes are for seeing; the stomach digests food. At this level students are ready to start viewing the body as one whole system. One way to ease into this view is to study systems within the body such as the digestive system, circulatory system or the nervous system. This lesson introduces the brain, but not just the brain. It emphasizes how the brain interacts with the rest of the body. Students will learn about this by understanding 'messages' that go from parts of the body to the brain, and vice versa.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005
CK-12 Life Science Concepts for Middle School
Conditions of Use:
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CK-12’s Life Science delivers a full course of study in the life sciences for the middle school student, relating an understanding of the history, disciplines, tools, and modern techniques of science to the exploration of cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, evolution, prokaryotes, protists,fungi, plants, animals, invertebrates, vertebrates, human biology, and ecology. This digital textbook was reviewed for its alignment with California content standards.

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Genetics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CK-12 Foundation
Provider Set:
CK-12 FlexBook
Date Added:
11/29/2012
Cold Sensors
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Why can you feel cold even when you're sitting in a warm room? Scientists may have discovered the answer. This Science Update explores the neurological components of the senses warmth and cold.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
04/06/2008
Conversations with History: Visualizing the Relationship between Structure and Cellular Activity
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Host Harry Kreisler welcomes biophysicist Chikashi Toyoshima for a discussion of his remarkable achievement in capturing the first images of cellular activity as the calcium ion pump makes possible the contraction and relaxation of muscle tissue on a signal from the brain. Topics covered include: how structure determines process in cellular activity, the technical innovations required for this breakthrough in the biosciences, and why visualization is so important in understanding cellular processes. He also reflects on creativity in science and how the images he captured affected his understanding of humankind's place in the universe. (52 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Biology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Berkeley
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
08/18/2007
Coping with Changes
Conditions of Use:
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The purpose of this Science NetLinks lesson is to understand how the nervous system allows us to learn, remember, and cope with changes in the environment. In grades 3-5, students start viewing the body as one whole system, as one whole organism. In the 6th grade and up, students should start to understand how organs and organ systems work together. For instance, the brain is part of the nervous system and works in conjunction with neurons (cells). The nervous system works with all other body systems, such as the musculoskeletal system. The activities in this lesson introduce the nervous system, both in parts and as a whole. By learning about the whole system, students will understand that the brain, spinal cord, and nerve cells are at the root of all other body functions.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005