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Patterns Physics
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THE PATTERNS APPROACH
The Patterns Approach to science instruction emphasizes the use of mathematical and phenomenological patterns to predict the future and understand the past. Students construct science knowledge by making an initial “wild-guess”, asking questions, planning and conducting experiments, collecting data, finding a mathematical model that fits their data, explaining the phenomenon based on that model, then finally making a data-informed prediction. Harnessing their own experiences, students compare and contrast low-evidence predictions (wild guesses) to their data-informed prediction to live the experience and learn the value of evidence-based reasoning. Additionally, students engage in several engineering projects in each course, where they must use the Patterns they discover in their designs to optimize their solutions. The Patterns Approach utilizes technology, student-constructed knowledge, frequent opportunities for student talk, and language supports to ensure the engagement and success of every student. By emphasizing, rather than removing, the mathematical connections to science, the Patterns Approach supports student conceptual understanding by connecting real-world inquiry experiences, graphical representations, and mathematical representations of science phenomena.

Subject:
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Portland STEM Partnership
Date Added:
08/10/2020
State and Local Government and Politics: Prospects for Sustainability
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An introductory text on US State and Local Government suitable for undergraduate studies (upper/lower division). Originally published by Oregon State University (download link: https://open.oregonstate.education/government/, the authors have been regularly updating the text.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Brent S. Steel
Christopher A. Simon
Nicholas P. Lovrich
Virginia Edition updated by JamesJ.Tuite
Date Added:
08/10/2020
American Government and Politics  II
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Originally published as American Government and Politics in the Information Age in 2011 as CC BY-NC-SA.
Updated by James J. Tuite. This is a textbook for the first part of an introductory course on the American political process. Teaches the structure, operation, and process of national, state, and local governments.

Additional teaching materials available to verified teaching faculty by contacting tuitej@centralvirginia.edu.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
2020 Edition revised and edited by James J. Tuite
DL Paletz
DM Owen
TE Cook
Date Added:
08/10/2020
US Government and Politics I
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Originally published as American Government and Politics in the Information Age in 2011 as CC BY-NC-SA.
Updated by James J. Tuite. This is a textbook for the first part of an introductory course on the American political process. Teaches the structure, operation, and process of national, state, and local governments.

Additional teaching materials available to verified teaching faculty by contacting tuitej@centralvirginia.edu.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
2020 Edition Updated by James J. Tuite
David L. Paletz
Diana Owen
Timothy E. Cook
Date Added:
08/10/2020
Humanizing Online Teaching and Learning
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Humanizing Online Teaching and Learning is a collection of chapters written by the participants of a free open course on the Canvas Open Network. A variety of methods for increasing presence in online courses were shared in this multi-institutional, international, online professional learning opportunity. Susan Spellman Cann along with Erin Luong, Christina Hendricks, and Verena Roberts happily contributed to chapter six, which focuses on social learning in online spaces. There is a special focus on the importance of relationships which are essential in any learning, but especially online.

Subject:
Education
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Whitney Kilgore
Date Added:
08/08/2020
The Epic of Gilgamesh
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Public Domain
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This video offers a summary and analysis of the main themes in the Epic of Gilgamesh. The world’s first recorded epic poem, from Mesopotamia, explores important questions: can humans defy aging and conquer death?

Subject:
Literature
World Cultures
Ancient History
World History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
08/08/2020
Busy Bees (2nd - 3rd Grade) Agricultural STEM Activity
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In this lesson, students will learn about bees and their connection to agriculture. Includes activity instructions, variations, and exentsion activities.

NGSS: 2-LS2-2

Common Core: RL.1.1, RI.7, SL2.5

Social Sciences: K.11

Time: 45 minutes

Subject:
Agriculture
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Breakfast Relay (2nd - 3rd Grade) Agricultural STEM Activity
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This lesson pairs with the book "Pancakes, Pancakes!" by Eric Carle. First read this story and then run the breakfast relay outlined in this lesson.

NGSS: K-ESS3-3

CCSS: SL.K.3

Social Sciences: K.10, K.17, 1.12, 3.12, 5.11, 4.18

Time: 30 minutes

Materials: "Pancakes, Pancakes!" by Eric Carle, food cards and bags labeled: earth, farm, store, factory.

Subject:
Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Tree Identification (2nd - 3rd Grade) Agricultural STEM Activity
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In this lesson, students will investigate how trees change by the season. Includes discussion of techniques for identifying trees, journaling changes that take place over time for the same tree throughout the school year, a list of vocabulary, a field guid to identifying trees, and a tree journal worksheet for students.

NGSS: Partially meets 2-LS4-1

Common Core: W.2.7, W.2.8, 2.MD.D.10

Social Sciences: 3.12, 4.12

Time: 1 hour initially, then 30-40 minute lessons through the seasons

Materials: "The Seasons of Arnold's Apple Tree" book, My Tree Journal pages (included), pencils, colored pencils, and clipboards.

Subject:
Agriculture
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Apples to Oregon (K - 4th Grade) Agricultural STEM Activity
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In this lesson, students are introduced to trees and the many things we commonly use that come from trees. Includes introductory movement activity, guided discussion, a matching game, and fun facts.

NGSS: Partially meets 1-LS1-1, 2-PS1-1, 2-PS1-2

Common Core: W.2.7, W.2.8

Time: 30 minutes

Materials: "Apples to Oregon" book and three paper lunch bags labled: wood, food, cellulose.

Subject:
Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Structural Engineering (2nd - 3rd Grade) Five Lesson Unit
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This unit consists of five lessons covering architecture and structural engineering. Each lesson includes goals, anticipatory set, learner objectives, guided practice, procedure instructions, closing activities, and extensions. Student handouts and worksheets are also included.

Lesson 1: Animal Structures
Lesson 2: Homes
Lesson 3: Stability
Lesson 4: Local Towers & Bridges
Lesson 5: Schools

NGSS: K-2-ETS1-1, K-2-ETS1-2, K-2-ETS1-3, 3-5-ETS1-1, 3-5-ETS1-2, 3-5-ETS1-3

Materials: blocks or other building toys, ruler, book or ball (for weight), graph paper, pencils, and floor plan of school or hand-drawn approximation featuring highlights.

Subject:
Applied Science
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/07/2020
See them Sprout (PreK - 1st Grade) Agricultural STEM Activity
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In this lesson, students will investigate the miraculous process of air and water combining with seeds, soil, and sunlight to create nearly all the food we eat. Extension activities can take this a step further by encouraging kids to track growth rates of different seeds in an observation journal. Includes place-based connection, activity instructions, extension activities, songs, and vobaulary list.

NGSS: Partially meets 2-LS2-1, 1-LS1-1

Common Core: W.2.7, W.2.8, and MD.K, MD.1, MD.2.1, MD.3.3, MD.4.4, MD.5 with extension activities.

Time: 45 minutes

Materials: "One Bean" book or other book about plant germination, clear plastic cups, paper cups, paper towels, seeds, and water.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Agriculture
Elementary Education
Life Science
Botany
Ecology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Erosion (PreK - 1st Grade) Geology Lesson
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In this lesson, students will learn what erosion is and how human actions influence erosion. Includes introduction, demonstration instructions, and questions for wrap-up discussion.

NGSS: K-ESS3-3

Time: 50 minutes

Materials: plastic containers with sand and gravel, sponges, and plastic cups.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Geology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Layers of the Earth (PreK - 1st Grade) Geology Lesson
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In this lesson, students will learn about how volcanoes and mountains affect weather. Includes video links, discussion, demonstration, and an additional activity.

NGSS: K-ESS3-2

Time: 50 minutes

Materials: umbrella and sponge.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Physical Science
Atmospheric Science
Geology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Oregon’s Civil Rights Years
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Public Domain
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A 360° tour of the Oregon Historical Society and Oregon Black Pioneer exhibit "Racing for Change". The exhibit explores the Civil Rights Era history of Portland focused on the 1960s and 1970s. The resource includes videos, photographs, and lesson guides (MS Word) for grades 3-5 and 6-12. The webpage also includes links to additional OHS lesson resources on the history of race relations in Oregon.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Lesson
Author:
Oregon Black Pioneers
Oregon Historical Society
Date Added:
08/10/2020
Reproducible Research
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Modern scientific research takes advantage of programs such as Python and R that are open source. As such, they can be modified and shared by the wider community. Additionally, there is added functionality through additional programs and packages, such as IPython, Sweave, and Shiny. These packages can be used to not only execute data analyses, but also to present data and results consistently across platforms (e.g., blogs, websites, repositories and traditional publishing venues).

The goal of the course is to show how to implement analyses and share them using IPython for Python, Sweave and knitr for RStudio to create documents that are shareable and analyses that are reproducible.

Course outline is as follows:
1) Use of IPython notebooks to demonstrate and explain code, visualize data, and display analysis results
2) Applications of Python modules such as SymPy, NumPy, pandas, and SciPy
3) Use of Sweave to demonstrate and explain code, visualize data, display analysis results, and create documents and presentations
4) Integration and execution of IPython and R code and analyses using the IPython notebook

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Christopher Ahern
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Statistics of DOOM
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About Stats of DOOM

Support Statistics of DOOM! This page and the YouTube channel to help people learn statistics by including step-by-step instructions for SPSS, R, Excel, and other programs. Demonstrations are provided including power, data screening, analysis, write up tips, effect sizes, and graphs. Help guides and course materials are also provided!

When I originally started posting my videos on YouTube, I never really thought people would be interested in them - minus a few overachieving students. I am glad that I've been able to help so many folks! I have taught many statistics courses - you can view full classes by using the Learn tab in the top right. I have also taught cognitive and language courses, some with coding (see the NLP and Language Modeling courses), and some without (see Other Courses). I hope this website provides structure to all my materials for you to use for yourself or your classroom.

Each page has an example syllabus, video lectures laid out with that syllabus (if I have them!), and links to the appropriate materials. Any broken links can be reported by sending me an email (linked at the bottom). Stats Tools was designed for learning statistics, which morphed into learning coding, open science, statistics, and more! Recommendations, comments, and other questions are welcome with the general suggestion to post on the specific video or page you have a question on. I do my best to answer, but also work a full-time job.

These resources wouldn't be possible without the help of many fantastic people over the years including:

All the Help Desk TAs: Rachel E. Monroe, Marshall Beauchamp, Louis Oberdiear, Simone Donaldson, Kim Koch, Jessica Willis, Samantha Hunter, Flora Forbes, Tabatha Hopke
Research colleagues: K.D. Valentine, John E. Scofield, Jeff Pavlacic
And more! Pages with specific content made by others are noted on that page.

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
StatsTools
Author:
Erin M. Buchanan
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Research project initialization and organization following reproducible research guidelines
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Workshop goals
- Why are we teaching this
- Why is this important
- For future and current you
- For research as a whole
- Lack of reproducibility in research is a real problem

Materials and how we'll use them
- Workshop landing page, with

- links to the Materials
- schedule

Structure oriented along the Four Facets of Reproducibility:

- Documentation
- Organization
- Automation
- Dissemination

Will be available after the Workshop

How this workshop is run
- This is a Carpentries Workshop
- that means friendly learning environment
- Code of Conduct
- active learning
- work with the people next to you
- ask for help

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Hilmar Lapp
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Reproducible Science Workshop
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Workshop goals
- Why are we teaching this
- Why is this important
- For future and current you
- For research as a whole
- Lack of reproducibility in research is a real problem

Materials and how we'll use them
- Workshop landing page, with

- links to the Materials
- schedule

Structure oriented along the Four Facets of Reproducibility:

- Documentation
- Organization
- Automation
- Dissemination

Will be available after the Workshop

How this workshop is run
- This is a Carpentries Workshop
- that means friendly learning environment
- Code of Conduct
- active learning
- work with the people next to you
- ask for help

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Dan Leehr
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Introduction materials for Reproducible Research Curriculum
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Workshop goals
- Why are we teaching this
- Why is this important
- For future and current you
- For research as a whole
- Lack of reproducibility in research is a real problem

Materials and how we'll use them
- Workshop landing page, with

- links to the Materials
- schedule

Structure oriented along the Four Facets of Reproducibility:

- Documentation
- Organization
- Automation
- Dissemination

Will be available after the Workshop

How this workshop is run
- This is a Carpentries Workshop
- that means friendly learning environment
- Code of Conduct
- active learning
- work with the people next to you
- ask for help

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Kristina Riemer
Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel
Pat Schloss
Paul Magwene
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Reproducible Science Curriculum Lesson for Organization
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Workshop goals
- Why are we teaching this
- Why is this important
- For future and current you
- For research as a whole
- Lack of reproducibility in research is a real problem

Materials and how we'll use them
- Workshop landing page, with

- links to the Materials
- schedule

Structure oriented along the Four Facets of Reproducibility:

- Documentation
- Organization
- Automation
- Dissemination

Will be available after the Workshop

How this workshop is run
- This is a Carpentries Workshop
- that means friendly learning environment
- Code of Conduct
- active learning
- work with the people next to you
- ask for help

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Ciera Martinez
Courtney Soderberg
Hilmar Lapp
Jennifer Bryan
Kristina Riemer
Naupaka Zimmerman
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Reproducible Science Curriculum Lesson for Literate Programming
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Workshop goals
- Why are we teaching this
- Why is this important
- For future and current you
- For research as a whole
- Lack of reproducibility in research is a real problem

Materials and how we'll use them
- Workshop landing page, with

- links to the Materials
- schedule

Structure oriented along the Four Facets of Reproducibility:

- Documentation
- Organization
- Automation
- Dissemination

Will be available after the Workshop

How this workshop is run
- This is a Carpentries Workshop
- that means friendly learning environment
- Code of Conduct
- active learning
- work with the people next to you
- ask for help

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Ciera Martinez
Courtney Soderberg
Hilmar Lapp
Jennifer Bryan
Kristina Riemer
Naupaka Zimmerman
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Reproducible Science Curriculum Lesson for Version Control
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Workshop goals
- Why are we teaching this
- Why is this important
- For future and current you
- For research as a whole
- Lack of reproducibility in research is a real problem

Materials and how we'll use them
- Workshop landing page, with

- links to the Materials
- schedule

Structure oriented along the Four Facets of Reproducibility:

- Documentation
- Organization
- Automation
- Dissemination

Will be available after the Workshop

How this workshop is run
- This is a Carpentries Workshop
- that means friendly learning environment
- Code of Conduct
- active learning
- work with the people next to you
- ask for help

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Ciera Martinez
Hilmar Lapp
Karen Cranston
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Reproducible Science Curriculum Lesson for Automation
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Workshop goals
- Why are we teaching this
- Why is this important
- For future and current you
- For research as a whole
- Lack of reproducibility in research is a real problem

Materials and how we'll use them
- Workshop landing page, with

- links to the Materials
- schedule

Structure oriented along the Four Facets of Reproducibility:

- Documentation
- Organization
- Automation
- Dissemination

Will be available after the Workshop

How this workshop is run
- This is a Carpentries Workshop
- that means friendly learning environment
- Code of Conduct
- active learning
- work with the people next to you
- ask for help

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
François Michonneau
Kim Gilbert
Matt Pennell
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Reproducible Science Curriculum Lesson for Publication
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Workshop goals
- Why are we teaching this
- Why is this important
- For future and current you
- For research as a whole
- Lack of reproducibility in research is a real problem

Materials and how we'll use them
- Workshop landing page, with

- links to the Materials
- schedule

Structure oriented along the Four Facets of Reproducibility:

- Documentation
- Organization
- Automation
- Dissemination

Will be available after the Workshop

How this workshop is run
- This is a Carpentries Workshop
- that means friendly learning environment
- Code of Conduct
- active learning
- work with the people next to you
- ask for help

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Dave Clements
Hilmar Lapp
Karen Cranston
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Reproducible Research Methods
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This is the website for the Autumn 2014 course “Reproducible Research Methods” taught by Eric C. Anderson at NOAA’s Southwest Fisheries Science Center. The course meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 to 4:30 PM in Room 188 of the Fisheries Ecology Division.
It runs from Oct 7 to December 18.

The goal of this course is for scientists, researchers, and students to learn:

to write programs in the R language to manipulate and analyze data,
to integrate data analysis with report generation and article preparation using knitr,
to work fluently within the Rstudio integrated development environment for R,
to use git version control software and GitHub to effectively manage source code, collaborate efficiently with other researchers, and neatly package their research.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Eric C. Anderson
Date Added:
08/07/2020
R package primer
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Course summary
A minimal standard for data analysis and other scientific computations is that they be reproducible: that the code and data are assembled in a way so that another group can re-create all of the results (e.g., the figures in a paper). The importance of such reproducibility is now widely recognized, but it is still not so widely practiced as it should be, in large part because many computational scientists (and particularly statisticians) have not fully adopted the required tools for reproducible research.

In this course, we will discuss general principles for reproducible research but will focus primarily on the use of relevant tools (particularly make, git, and knitr), with the goal that the students leave the course ready and willing to ensure that all aspects of their computational research (software, data analyses, papers, presentations, posters) are reproducible.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Karl Broman
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Tools for Reproducible Research
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Course summary
A minimal standard for data analysis and other scientific computations is that they be reproducible: that the code and data are assembled in a way so that another group can re-create all of the results (e.g., the figures in a paper). The importance of such reproducibility is now widely recognized, but it is still not so widely practiced as it should be, in large part because many computational scientists (and particularly statisticians) have not fully adopted the required tools for reproducible research.

In this course, we will discuss general principles for reproducible research but will focus primarily on the use of relevant tools (particularly make, git, and knitr), with the goal that the students leave the course ready and willing to ensure that all aspects of their computational research (software, data analyses, papers, presentations, posters) are reproducible.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Karl Broman
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Rigor Champions and Resources
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Efforts to Instill the Fundamental Principles of Rigorous ResearchRigorous experimental procedures and transparent reporting of research results are vital to the continued success of the biomedical enterprise at both the preclinical and the clinical levels; therefore, NINDS convened major stakeholders in October 2018 to discuss how best to encourage rigorous biomedical research practices. The attendees discussed potential improvements to current training resources meant to instill the principles of rigorous research in current and future scientists, ideal attributes of a potential new educational resource, and cultural factors needed to ensure the success of such training. Please see the event website for more information about this workshop, including video recordings of the discussion, or the recent publication summarizing the workshop.Rigor ChampionsAs described in this publication, enthusiastic individuals ("champions") who want to drive improvements in rigorous research practices, transparent reporting, and comprehensive education may come from all career stages and sectors, including undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, researchers, educators, institutional leaders, journal editors, scientific societies, private industry, and funders. We encouraged champions to organize themselves into intra- and inter-institutional communities to effect change within and across scientific institutions. These communities can then share resources and best practices, propose changes to current training and research infrastructure, build new tools to support better research practices, and support rigorous research on a daily basis.If you are interested learning more, you can join this grassroots online workspace or email us at RigorChampions@nih.gov.Rigor ResourcesIn order to understand the current landscape of training in the principles of rigorous research, NINDS is gathering a list of public resources that are, or can be made, freely accessible to the scientific community and beyond. We hope that compiling these resources will help identify gaps in training and stimulate discussion about proposed improvements and the building of new resources that facilitate training in transparency and other rigorous research practices. Please peruse the resources compiled thus far below, and contact us at RigorChampions@nih.gov to let us know about other potential resources.NINDS does not endorse any of these resources and leaves it to the scientific community to judge their quality.Resources TableCategories of resources listed in the table include Books and Articles, Guidelines and Protocols, Organizations and Training Programs, Software and Other Digital Resources, and Videos and Courses.

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Institutes of Health
Author:
National Institutes of Health
Date Added:
08/07/2020
NIGMS Clearinghouse for Training Modules to Enhance Data Reproducibility
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In January 2014, NIH launched a series of initiatives to enhance rigor and reproducibility in research. As a part of this initiative, NIGMS, along with nine other NIH institutes and centers, issued a funding opportunity announcement (FOA) RFA-GM-15-006 to develop, pilot, and disseminate training modules to enhance data reproducibility. This FOA was reissued in 2018 (RFA-GM-18-002).For the benefit of the scientific community, we will post the products of grants funded by these FOAs on this website as they become available. In addition, we are sharing here other relevant training modules developed, including courses developed from administrative supplements to NIGMS predoctoral T32 grants.

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
NIH
Author:
National Institutes of Health
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Mapping the universe of registered reports
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Registered reports present a substantial departure from traditional publishing models with the goal of enhancing the transparency and credibility of the scientific literature. We map the evolving universe of registered reports to assess their growth, implementation and shortcomings at journals across scientific disciplines.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Nature Human Behaviour
Author:
John P. A. Ioannidis
Tom E. Hardwicke
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Enhancing Reproducibility through Rigor and Transparency | grants.nih.gov
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The information provided on this website is designed to assist the extramural community in addressing rigor and transparency in NIH grant applications and progress reports. Scientific rigor and transparency in conducting biomedical research is key to the successful application of knowledge toward improving health outcomes.

Definition Scientific rigor is the strict application of the scientific method to ensure unbiased and well-controlled experimental design, methodology, analysis, interpretation and reporting of results.

Goals The NIH strives to exemplify and promote the highest level of scientific integrity, public accountability, and social responsibility in the conduct of science. Grant applications instructions and the criteria by which reviewers are asked to evaluate the scientific merit of the application are intended to:
• ensure that NIH is funding the best and most rigorous science,
• highlight the need for applicants to describe details that may have been previously overlooked,
• highlight the need for reviewers to consider such details in their reviews through updated review language, and
• minimize additional burden.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
NIH
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Pre-analysis Plans: A Stocktaking
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The evidence-based community has championed the public registration of pre-analysis plans (PAPs) as a solution to the problem of research credibility, but without any evidence that PAPs actually bolster the credibility of research. We analyze a representative sample of 195 pre-analysis plans (PAPs) from the American Economic Association (AEA) and Evidence in Governance and Politics (EGAP) registration platforms to assess whether PAPs are sufficiently clear, precise and comprehensive to be able to achieve their objectives of preventing “fishing” and reducing the scope for post-hoc adjustment of research hypotheses. We also analyze a subset of 93 PAPs from projects that have resulted in publicly available papers to ascertain how faithfully they adhere to their pre-registered specifications and hypotheses. We find significant variation in the extent to which PAPs are accomplishing the goals they were designed to achieve

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Daniel Posner
George Ofosu
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Linking to Data - Effect on Citation Rates in Astronomy
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Is there a difference in citation rates between articles that were published with links to data and articles that were not? Besides being interesting from a purely academic point of view, this question is also highly relevant for the process of furthering science. Data sharing not only helps the process of verification of claims, but also the discovery of new findings in archival data. However, linking to data still is a far cry away from being a "practice", especially where it comes to authors providing these links during the writing and submission process. You need to have both a willingness and a publication mechanism in order to create such a practice. Showing that articles with links to data get higher citation rates might increase the willingness of scientists to take the extra steps of linking data sources to their publications. In this presentation we will show this is indeed the case: articles with links to data result in higher citation rates than articles without such links. The ADS is funded by NASA Grant NNX09AB39G.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
arXiv:1111.3618 [astro-ph]
Author:
Alberto Accomazzi
Edwin A. Henneken
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Analysis of Open Data and Computational Reproducibility in Registered Reports in Psychology
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Ongoing technological developments have made it easier than ever before for scientists to share their data, materials, and analysis code. Sharing data and analysis code makes it easier for other researchers to re-use or check published research. These benefits will only emerge if researchers can reproduce the analysis reported in published articles, and if data is annotated well enough so that it is clear what all variables mean. Because most researchers have not been trained in computational reproducibility, it is important to evaluate current practices to identify practices that can be improved. We examined data and code sharing, as well as computational reproducibility of the main results, without contacting the original authors, for Registered Reports published in the psychological literature between 2014 and 2018. Of the 62 articles that met our inclusion criteria, data was available for 40 articles, and analysis scripts for 37 articles. For the 35 articles that shared both data and code and performed analyses in SPSS, R, Python, MATLAB, or JASP, we could run the scripts for 31 articles, and reproduce the main results for 20 articles. Although the articles that shared both data and code (35 out of 62, or 56%) and articles that could be computationally reproduced (20 out of 35, or 57%) was relatively high compared to other studies, there is clear room for improvement. We provide practical recommendations based on our observations, and link to examples of good research practices in the papers we reproduced.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Daniel Lakens
Jaroslav Gottfried
Nicholas Alvaro Coles
Pepijn Obels
Seth Ariel Green
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Dissemination and publication of research findings: an updated review of related biases
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Objectives To identify and appraise empirical studies on publication and related biases published since 1998; to assess methods to deal with publication and related biases; and to examine, in a random sample of published systematic reviews, measures taken to prevent, reduce and detect dissemination bias. Data sources The main literature search, in August 2008, covered the Cochrane Methodology Register Database, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED and CINAHL. In May 2009, PubMed, PsycINFO and OpenSIGLE were also searched. Reference lists of retrieved studies were also examined. Review methods In Part I, studies were classified as evidence or method studies and data were extracted according to types of dissemination bias or methods for dealing with it. Evidence from empirical studies was summarised narratively. In Part II, 300 systematic reviews were randomly selected from MEDLINE and the methods used to deal with publication and related biases were assessed. Results Studies with significant or positive results were more likely to be published than those with non-significant or negative results, thereby confirming findings from a previous HTA report. There was convincing evidence that outcome reporting bias exists and has an impact on the pooled summary in systematic reviews. Studies with significant results tended to be published earlier than studies with non-significant results, and empirical evidence suggests that published studies tended to report a greater treatment effect than those from the grey literature. Exclusion of non-English-language studies appeared to result in a high risk of bias in some areas of research such as complementary and alternative medicine. In a few cases, publication and related biases had a potentially detrimental impact on patients or resource use. Publication bias can be prevented before a literature review (e.g. by prospective registration of trials), or detected during a literature review (e.g. by locating unpublished studies, funnel plot and related tests, sensitivity analysis modelling), or its impact can be minimised after a literature review (e.g. by confirmatory large-scale trials, updating the systematic review). The interpretation of funnel plot and related statistical tests, often used to assess publication bias, was often too simplistic and likely misleading. More sophisticated modelling methods have not been widely used. Compared with systematic reviews published in 1996, recent reviews of health-care interventions were more likely to locate and include non-English-language studies and grey literature or unpublished studies, and to test for publication bias. Conclusions Dissemination of research findings is likely to be a biased process, although the actual impact of such bias depends on specific circumstances. The prospective registration of clinical trials and the endorsement of reporting guidelines may reduce research dissemination bias in clinical research. In systematic reviews, measures can be taken to minimise the impact of dissemination bias by systematically searching for and including relevant studies that are difficult to access. Statistical methods can be useful for sensitivity analyses. Further research is needed to develop methods for qualitatively assessing the risk of publication bias in systematic reviews, and to evaluate the effect of prospective registration of studies, open access policy and improved publication guidelines.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Health Technology Assessment
Author:
Aj Sutton
C Hing
C Pang
Cs Kwok
F Song
I Harvey
J Ryder
L Hooper
S Parekh
Yk Loke
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Rigor and Reproducibility | grants.nih.gov
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The information provided on this website is designed to assist the extramural community in addressing rigor and transparency in NIH grant applications and progress reports. Scientific rigor and transparency in conducting biomedical research is key to the successful application of knowledge toward improving health outcomes.

Definition
Scientific rigor is the strict application of the scientific method to ensure unbiased and well-controlled experimental design, methodology, analysis, interpretation and reporting of results.

Goals
The NIH strives to exemplify and promote the highest level of scientific integrity, public accountability, and social responsibility in the conduct of science. Grant applications instructions and the criteria by which reviewers are asked to evaluate the scientific merit of the application are intended to:

• ensure that NIH is funding the best and most rigorous science,
• highlight the need for applicants to describe details that may have been previously overlooked,
• highlight the need for reviewers to consider such details in their reviews through updated review language, and
• minimize additional burden.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
NIH
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Open + Reproducible Research Workshop
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CC BY
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Topics covered:

Understanding reproducible research
Setting up a reproducible project
Understanding power
Preregistering your study
Keeping track of things
Containing bias
Sharing your work

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
April Clyburne-Sherin
Courtney Soderberg
Date Added:
08/07/2020