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10 for the Win!
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Title:  10 for the Win!Grade: Kindergarten Overall Goal: To have students be able to count by multiples of 10 and comprehend the idea of a sequence of steps involved in a process.  StandardsLearning ObjectiveAssessment5d Students understand how automation works and use algorithmic thinking to develop a sequence of steps to create and test automated solutions. K.NS.1: Count to at least 100 by ones and tens and count on by one from any number.Students will be able to program the beebots to go the correct distance. Students will be able to count to 100 by tens.The students will have to use the beebots to move forward the correct amount of steps. The students will have the squares the beebot travels represent sets of 10.  Key Terms & Definitions: Sequence- certain order in which steps flowSkip counting- skipping numbers while counting, counting by multiples Number line- line which shows number in order, often marked at intervalsProgram- provide machine with coded instructions to perform task  Lesson Introduction (Hook, Grabber): 10 Students will paint hands and stamp them on paper! Each set of hands will represent a set of 10. We will do this all the way up to 100. This paper will be hung in the front of the classroom as a reminder of multiples of 10. Lesson Main:After hanging up our poster with the hands displaying multiples of 10, the teacher would count with the class by 10’s all the way up to 100, while referring to the poster so they can follow along.We will also pass out a number line to the students that highlights 10’s so they have a reference if they struggle.We will make a number line and write multiples of 10 along the side. We will measure out the space between numbers so that it is equal to the length the Beebot travels for each time the button is pushed. For example, if the student wanted to get to 30, they would have to know that you count up by saying “10, 20,30” and they would need to press the forward button on the Beebot 3 times. Each press of the button is a multiple of 10. For this activity, the teacher will break up the students into small groups and they will work together. They will draw a card which will have a multiple of 10 on it ranging from 10-100. The students will have to decide how many 10’s it takes to count up to that number, as well as how many times they will need to program the Beebot to reach the answer on the number line.   Lesson Ending:For the lesson ending, we will regroup as a class and talk about how we felt the Beebot activity went. Then we will count together by 10’s up to 100 again to reiterate what we have been learning. Lastly, we will pass out a worksheet to the students which we have included a link to under our resources, and have them complete it individually. This will give us an idea of the students understanding of this concept and can be used for our assessment.  Assessment Rubric: GreatAveragePoorIndicatorDescriptionDescriptionDescriptionHand Cut-outsStudent participated in the tracing and cutting out of hands.Student partially participated in the tracing and cutting out of hands.Student failed to participate in the tracing and cutting out of hands.Beebot activityStudent was able to successfully move the Beebot to correct answer.Student was able to move the Beebot, but not to the correct answer.Student was unable to move the Beebot and was unable to correctly answer.WorksheetStudent was able to correctly fill out the entire worksheet.Student was able to fill out 70% of the worksheet.Student was unable to fill out at least 70% of the worksheet.  Resources / Artifacts: Number line for students https://www.helpingwithmath.com/printables/others/lin0301number11.htmWebsite which has handprint idea on it https://www.theclassroomkey.com/2016/02/big-list-skip-counting-activities.htmlLesson assessment used in the lesson ending https://www.pinterest.com/pin/287597126178910688  Differentiation:       Differentiation for ability levelsIf a student really struggled with math skills, we could place them in a group with stronger math students. We could also offer an alternative activity for the Beebot timeline where we made the timeline go up by smaller multiples. For the worksheet, they could receive a longer amount of time to work on it and have directions read to them/receive help as needed.        Differentiation for access & resourcesIf the school had limited resources and did not have access to these robots, they could use other tools like toy cars or something they could use to roll to the spots on the timeline. The game could be altered to fit a large variety of resources. The worksheet we used was found online but a similar version could be created by the teacher. Anticipated Difficulties: Some students might struggle with the concept of skip counting. It may be hard at first for them to remember the multiples of 10. Hopefully by making a poster and providing them with their own number line for reference, this will eliminate some potential difficulties the students may have. 

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Carmen Blackley
Date Added:
11/28/2017
BASIC WFF'N PROOF: A TEACHING GUIDE
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A teaching guide for teachers to instruct students in the gaming rules and procedures for Basic Wff'n Proof. This game teaches symbolic logic and problem solving. The content is an overview of the game of Wff'n Proof for interested coaches.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Game
Author:
LA TRELLE PIERRE
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Discovering Phi: The Golden Ratio
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Educational Use
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Students discover the mathematical constant phi, the golden ratio, through hands-on activities. They measure dimensions of "natural objects"—a star, a nautilus shell and human hand bones—and calculate ratios of the measured values, which are close to phi. Then students learn a basic definition of a mathematical sequence, specifically the Fibonacci sequence. By taking ratios of successive terms of the sequence, they find numbers close to phi. They solve a squares puzzle that creates an approximate Fibonacci spiral. Finally, the instructor demonstrates the rule of the Fibonacci sequence via a LEGO® MINDSTORMS® NXT robot equipped with a pen. The robot (already created as part of the companion activity, The Fibonacci Sequence & Robots) draws a Fibonacci spiral that is similar to the nautilus shape.

Subject:
Engineering
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Nicole Abaid
Date Added:
09/18/2014
The Fibonacci Sequence & Robots
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Educational Use
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Using the LEGO® NXT robotics kit, students construct and program robots to illustrate and explore the Fibonacci sequence. Within teams, students are assigned roles: group leader, chassis builder, arm builder, chief programmer, and Fibonacci verifier. By designing a robot that moves based on the Fibonacci sequence of numbers, they can better visualize how quickly the numbers in the sequence grow. To program the robot to move according to these numbers, students break down the sequence into simple algebraic equations so that the computer can understand the Fibonacci sequence.

Subject:
Engineering
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Alexander Kozak
Nicole Abaid
Russell Holstein
Vikram Kapila
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Piecing Together the Plot
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CC BY-NC
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In this seminar, you will be working on developing your narrative writing. By focusing on the plot, or the series of events, in a narrative writing, you will be able to create a more engaging and interesting story. The emphasis will be on creating a story arc that includes a problem and a solution and/ or rising and falling action. You will learn about these elements by seeing examples, identifying them, and finally writing them yourself. You will also compare and classify elements of plot in multiple examples of text. This seminar is the next logical step after completing the “Better Beginnings” seminar because it focuses on the “middle and end” of narrative writing. After completing both of these seminars, you should feel ready to create a narrative writing that has a strong beginning-middle-end.StandardsCC.1.4.4.M/ 1.4.5.MWrite narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events 

Subject:
Elementary Education
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
02/08/2018
Sequence/Chronological Order, Cause/Effect, and Problem/Solution
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This seminar is a study of Sequence/Chronological Order, Cause and Effect, and Problem/Solution text structures. Research shows sequence and chronological order as separate structures and also as one and the same. As for cause/effect and problem/solution text structures, these are often confused by learners. These concerns will be addressed in this seminar while you learn how authors organize ideas. As a result, this will help you to better understand the nonfiction texts you are exposed to, along with the graphic organizers used to support the texts.StandardsCC.1.2.5.E Use text structure, in and among texts, to interpret information.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
02/09/2018