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Bread and Roses Strike of 1912: Two Months in Lawrence, Massachusetts, that Changed Labor History
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The Lawrence Textile Strike was a public protest mainly of immigrant workers from several countries, including Austria, Belgium, Cuba, Canada, France, England, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Spain, Syria, and Turkey. According to the 1910 census, 65% of mill workers (many of whom eventually struck) lived in the United States for less than 10 years; 47% for less than five years. Prompted by a wage cut, the walkout spread quickly from mill to mill across the city. Strikers defied the assumptions of conservative trade unions within the American Federation of Labor that immigrant, largely female and ethnically diverse workers could not be organized. The Lawrence strike is referred to as the “Bread and Roses” strike and “The Strike for Three Loaves." The first known source to do so was a 1916 labor anthology, The Cry for Justice: An Anthology of the Literature of Social Protest by Upton Sinclair. Prior to that, the slogan, used as the title of a 1911 poem by James Oppenheim, had been attributed to ‘Chicago Women Trade Unionists.’ It has also been attributed to socialist union organizer Rose Schneiderman. James Oppenheim claimed his seeing women strikers in Lawrence carrying a banner proclaiming “We Want Bread and Roses Too” inspired the poem, “Bread and Roses.” The poem, however, was written and published in 1911 prior to the strike. Later the poem was set to music by Caroline Kohlsaat and then by Mimi Farina. The song and slogan are now important parts of the labor movement and women’s movement worldwide. This exhibition was made in collaboration with the Lawrence History Center and the University of Massachusetts Lowell History Department.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
The Confusion of Identity Exploration in Middle School
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This 6th Grade literacy unit focuses on the Required Core Novel The Skin I’m In , by Sharon G. Flake. This unit explores the confusing journey to finding identity as a middle school aged student. The complex identities of five characters from the novel, Maleeka, Char, Mrs. Saunders, Caleb and John-John, are analyzed with multiple supplemental texts. The project for the students includes a daily “Identity Journal,” in which they analyze the characters using text evidence from both the novel and supplemental texts, and then compare these with what they are feeling or seeing within themselves. The unit culminates with a drawing of the student alongside the character the most identify with. Students present their journals with the drawings.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume II
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Diabetes - A Global Challenge - Epidemiology of Diabetes Part 2 (12:21)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This presentation will look at how the distribution of diabetes is, thus we’ll discuss how the distribution of diabetes are by type, gender, age, geographical region and ethnicity. The purpose of this discussion is to understand how serious a health problem the global epidemic of diabetes is, while increasing the understanding that it’s extremely necessary that we do whatever we can to fight against the diabetes epidemic in the future.

Course responsible: Associate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov, MD Nicolai Wewer Albrechtsen & Professor Jens Juul Holst

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen Department of Biomedical Science
Provider Set:
Diabetes - A Global Challenge
Author:
Professor Thorkild I. A. Sørensen
Date Added:
01/07/2014
Discovering My Identity
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students will describe aspects of their identities such as race, gender, class, age, ability, religion and more. They will watch two video clips featuring Marley Dias, an eleven-year-old girl who started the #1000BlackGirlBooks campaign, a book drive with the goal of collecting 1,000 books featuring African-American girls. After learning about the campaign, students will review illustrated books in their classroom and school library and analyze whether the characters in the books reflect their own identities or the identities of their families and friends. Finally, students will write a book review on one of the books and examine how the book’s characters are similar to or different from them.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
11/28/2016
Ethnic Conflict Research Project and Presentation
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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In this project, students research a current or past instance of ethnic or religious conflict from around the world such as ethnic cleansing and genocide. Following research, students present and reflect on causes and effects of the conflict. The project was designed for AP Human Geography but can be adapted to any global studies or issues courses.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Case Study
Author:
Amande Sodl
Date Added:
10/17/2017
Ethnicity and Race in World Politics, Fall 2005
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Ethnic and racial conflict appear to be the hallmark of the new world order. What accounts for the rise of ethnic/racial and nationalist sentiments and movements? What is the basis of ethnic and racial identity? What are the political claims and goals of such movements and is conflict inevitable? Introduces students to dominant theoretical approaches to race, ethnicity, and nationalism, and considers them in light of current events in Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Discerning the ethnic and racial dimensions of politics is considered by some indispensable to understanding contemporary world politics. This course seeks to answer fundamental questions about racial and ethnic politics. To begin, what are the bases of ethnic and racial identities? What accounts for political mobilization based upon such identities? What are the political claims and goals of such mobilization and is conflict between groups and/or with government forces inevitable? How do ethnic and racial identities intersect with other identities, such as gender and class, which are themselves the sources of social, political, and economic cleavages? Finally, how are domestic ethnic/racial politics connected to international human rights? To answer these questions, the course begins with an introduction to dominant theoretical approaches to racial and ethnic identity. The course then considers these approaches in light of current events in Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Nobles, Melissa
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Federalism
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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A video on Tulsa, Oklahoma Massacre that provides information on the topic and additional resources to learn more about the subject. There is also a discussion question on how local, state, and federal branches interact in order to govern.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Author:
Dr. Elizabeth Walker
Date Added:
02/08/2022
How Does Immigration Shape the Nation’s Identity?
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students consider what it means to be an American, using an opinion piece about the “American Identity Crisis” and several related videos as central texts. They answer a series of text-dependent questions, debate their opinions, write a brief constructed response, and make their own video that reflects their interpretation of “the face of America.”

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
11/30/2016
Intercultural Communication
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Intercultural Communication examines culture as a variable in interpersonal and collective communication. It explores the opportunities and problems arising from similarities and differences in communication patterns, processes, and codes among various cultural groups. It explores cultural universals, social categorization, stereotyping and discrimination, with a focus on topics including race, ethnicity, social class, religion, gender and sexuality as they relate to communication.

Subject:
Communication
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Missouri St. Louis
Author:
Shannon Ahrndt
Date Added:
12/07/2020
An Introduction to Global Health - Migration and Health (10:43)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The video introduces health challenges for the very varied group of migrants. A large part voluntarily migrated, but non-voluntary groups include refugees, IDPs, Stateless and trafficked persons. Internal migrants are both due to conflicts and disasters and general urbanisation. The different groups have very varied health issues, and also very varied protective frameworks – whether international conventions or national laws and services - and may not be able or willing to seek health care.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
External lecturer Siri Tellier
Date Added:
01/07/2013
An Introduction to Global Health - Migration and Health in a Scandinavian Context (09:23)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This presentation provides an introduction to migrant health and its importance in the global health context. We’ll look at the key concepts of migration and ethnicity and how they are related to health. Furthermore we’ll look at how barriers may arise in access to health care for migrants, and finally we’ll provide examples from a Scandinavian context on differences in health between migrants and ethnic Danes.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
Associate Professor Marie Norredam
Date Added:
01/07/2013
Introduction to Sociology 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Introduction to Sociology 2e adheres to the scope and sequence of a typical, one-semester introductory sociology course. It offers comprehensive coverage of core concepts, foundational scholars, and emerging theories, which are supported by a wealth of engaging learning materials. The textbook presents detailed section reviews with rich questions, discussions that help students apply their knowledge, and features that draw learners into the discipline in meaningful ways. The second edition retains the book’s conceptual organization, aligning to most courses, and has been significantly updated to reflect the latest research and provide examples most relevant to today’s students. In order to help instructors transition to the revised version, the 2e changes are described within the preface.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/01/2012
Introduction to Sociology 2e, Race and Ethnicity, Racial, Ethnic, and Minority Groups
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Understand the difference between race and ethnicityDefine a majority group (dominant group)Define a minority group (subordinate group)

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
11/15/2016
Remix
Introduction to Sociology 2e, Race and Ethnicity, Racial, Ethnic, and Minority Groups
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Understand the difference between race and ethnicityDefine a majority group (dominant group)Define a minority group (subordinate group)

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
Audra Kallimanis
Date Added:
06/25/2020
Racial Profiling
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Racial profiling occurs when law enforcement agents impermissibly use race, religion, ethnicity or national origin in deciding who to investigate. This lesson focuses on racial profiling. Students learn what the term means, discuss why it matters, conduct research and present their insights.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
11/30/2016
Unequal Unemployment
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students will examine the growth of unemployment from 2007 through the second quarter of 2009. Using basic and/or advanced math, students will compare and contrast unemployment rates across different states and across three racial and ethnic groups. An extension activity looks at unemployment among Asian Americans and can be adapted for other populations.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
11/29/2016
What Counts as History?
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Educational Use
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This lesson asks students to think about what counts as history. It is divided into two parts. Part 1 gets students thinking about what’s included in the history they study, and what’s missing. Part 1 can stand alone as a complete lesson. Part 2 extends the project. In it, they compare how a U.S. history book and an African-American history book address the same time period. They also reflect on how including new groups alters the study of history.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
11/30/2016
Writing for Change
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Students will learn about how the U.S. government classifies race and ethnicity. The teacher will play a video of students at Park East High School in New York City who contacted the U.S. Census Bureau to start a conversation about the way race and ethnicity are identified in census surveys. Students will also read a blog post explaining how the Census Bureau has changed the way it collects data on race and ethnicity. In the last part of the activity, students will write a letter that could be sent to a leader in their community with the goal of sparking some type of change.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/18/2019