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5. Ancient Greece
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Democracy. Philosophy. Sculpture. Dramatic tragedies. The Olympic Games. Many of the fundamental elements of Western culture first arose more than 2000 years ago in ancient Greece.

Subject:
Philosophy
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
5h. The Olympic Games
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The ancient Greeks loved competition of all sorts. Each year, the various city-states of Greece sent athletes to festivals of games, which were held to honor the gods. The most important and prestigious were the games held at Olympia to honor Zeus, the king of the gods. These Olympic games took place in the summer only once every four years.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Alexander Mosaic
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This art history video examines the "Alexander Mosaic" c. 100 B.C.E., tessera mosaic from the House of the Faun, Pompeii. This Roman floor mosaic may be based on a lost Hellenistic painting by Philoxenos of Eretria, The Battle of Issus, c. 315 B.C.E.). Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Ancient Civilizations (Computer)
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In the computer-based Ancient Civilizations activity, students create their own civilization and see how it fares over the years based on choices they make for location, animals, plants and materials. Students trade resources between their civilizations, repeatedly go to war with unnamed enemies, and learn some fun facts about real-world ancient civilizations along the way. This activity was inspired by Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Game
Author:
Eli Sheldon
Ancient Civilizations – Paper
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In the paper-based Ancient Civilizations activity, students create their own civilization and see how it fares over the years based on choices they make for location, animals, plants and natural resources. Students create an artistic rendering of their civilization, trade resources between their civilizations and go to war with an unnamed enemy. This activity was inspired by Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Game
Author:
Eli Sheldon
Ancient Civilizations of the World
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In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Ancient History Encyclopedia
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Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
ArtsEdge Media Collection: Ancient Empires
Conditions of Use:
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From the music, theater, and mythology of Ancient Greece, to traditional music of Chinese and Arab cultures, to the lore of Arthurian England, discover past and present civilizations through their arts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ancient History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Kennedy Center ARTSEDGE
Provider Set:
ARTSEDGE
City Dionysia: The Ancient Roots of Modern Theater
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Designed to support high school studies of theater, literature and world history, this site leads students though the development of Ancient ideas and contemporary theater practice, then on to write and stage their own original play while demonstrating an understanding of the rules and structure of Greek tragedy.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Ancient History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Kennedy Center ARTSEDGE
Provider Set:
ARTSEDGE
Common Core Curriculum Grade 2 ELA: Listening and Learning Strand
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The Listening and Learning Strand consists of a series of read_alouds organized by topics (called domains), many of which are informational in nature. The goal of the Listening and Learning Strand is for students to acquire language competence through listening, specifically building a rich vocabulary, and broad knowledge in history and science by being exposed to carefully selected, sequenced, and coherent read_alouds. The 9 units (or domains) provide lessons (including images and texts), as well as instructional objectives, core vocabulary, and assessment materials. The domain topics include: Fighting for a Cause; Fairy Tales and Tall Tales; Cycles in Nature; Insects; Ancient Greek Civilizations; Greek Myths; Charlotte's Web; and Immigration.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Digitally Telling the Story of Greek Figures
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Learn about Greek gods, heroes, and creatures through digital storytelling produced by students who have learned research techniques.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Erechtheion: Caryatid and Column
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This art history video discussion examines the Caryatid (South Porch) and Ionic Column (North Porch), Erechtheion on the Acropolis, Athens, marble, 421-407 B.C.E. (British Museum, London). Mnesicles may have been the architect.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Greco-Roman Origin Myths
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Mythology is a powerful vehicle for teaching students about symbols and the ways people have sought to explain their relationships to nature and to each other. Teachers can use these lessons and works of art to introduce or examine the role of myths in explaining human customs, mysteries about nature, or the reasons why things exist in the world. Lessons include: Pandora's Box; Apollo Pursuing Daphne; Diana and Endymion; The Fall of Phaeton; and The Corinthian Maid.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Gallery of Art
Greece: Part 1
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This lesson is one of three created as an interdisciplinary unit on the connection between the art and artifacts of a culture and the values and beliefs of the members of that culture. This unit begins with a class-wide investigation of Ancient Greece and concludes with a visit to the Ackland Art Museum. During the visit, students will have the opportunity to assess their predictions about the Ancient Greeks. In addition, students will look at works of art from other cultures and compare and contrast the visual information provided about those cultures with visual information provided about Greek culture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Winn Wheeler
Greece, The Roman Republic, and The Roman Empire
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This course will explore the rise and decline of Greek and Roman civilizations between the first millennium BCE and the first millennium CE. Specifically, it will focus on the political, economic, and social factors that shaped the development and maturation of these two Mediterranean civilizations during the period of classical antiquity and examine how they influenced the social and cultural development of later generations of Europeans. By the end of the course, the student will understand how these ancient Mediterranean civilizations developed and recognize their lasting influences on European culture. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: think critically about the development, maturation, and decline of Greek and Roman cultures during the first millennium BCE and the first millennium CE; identify the cultural origins of Greek civilization in the Mediterranean basin; compare and contrast the political and social organization of Greek city-states; evaluate the impact of the Persian War and the Peloponnesian Wars on the city-states of Greece; assess the political, social, and cultural legacies of Alexander the GreatĺÎĺĺÎĺs military conquests in the Mediterranean basin and Southwest Asia; identify the origins of the Roman Republic and evaluate the impact of political and economic expansion on Roman society; assess the political, social, and economic factors that led to the fall of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire; compare and contrast the accomplishments of Roman emperors during the first three centuries CE; identify factors that destabilized the Roman Empire during the third century CE; assess how Roman leaders responded to destabilizing forces and restructured the Roman Empire in the fourth and fifth centuries CE; evaluate the political, social, and cultural legacies of the Greek and Roman civilizations for the nations and peoples of Europe; analyze and interpret primary source documents from the period of classical antiquity using historical research methods. (History 301)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation