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AP World/H4 Family History Project
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator: Sean McManamon to meet NYC Social Studies Scope and Sequence  for World History. Adaptable to other grades. Cumulative assignment for the end of the year. Assignment asks students to connect family history interview to World History periodization.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/25/2019
AP World History: Japanese Internment Project
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator David Richman for his AP World History course. Adaptable to US History. Adaptable to other grades. Assignments ask students research the effects Executive Order 9066 had on families of Japanese descent, to analyze primary sources, and to create an illustrated story book detailing Ms. Wakatsuki’s time spent at Manzanar, a Japanese internment camp.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/30/2019
American Me: My Story, Their Story and Our Story
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Kenneth Porter for his Senior Leadership class. We all have different stories, reasons and various paths that we personally took or our relatives traversed to arrive at this nation of ours. This assignment tasks the student with researching the story of a relative/guardian who emigrated to this country. The student will learn the when, the what, the why and the how behind their story, in order to reveal to the student more about their own story.

Subject:
World Cultures
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/26/2019
Angolan Civil War
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This video explains how and why Fidel Castro supported the MPLA in Angola from 1975 to 2002. The Battle of Cuito Cuanavale was the largest military confrontation in Africa after World War II. The civil war in Angola was one of the longest and bloodiest conflicts of the twentieth century.

Subject:
World Cultures
History
World History
Cultural Geography
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
07/10/2020
Anne Frank in the World, 1929 - 1945, Teacher Workbook
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Educational Use
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This Anne Frank unit is designed with several lessons of various lengths. These lessons are usable in many different disciplines. Using one, several, or all of the lessons will address the unit's objectives to some degree. Students will accomplish some or all of the objectives depending on the number and nature of the lessons in which they participate.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
12/11/2013
Around the World in 1896
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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This is a lesson in which students take a trip around the world in 1896 using an online collection of 900 images. The collection includes photos of railroads, elephants, camels, horses, sleds and sleighs, sedan chairs, rickshaws, and other types of transportation, as well as city views, street and harbor scenes, landscapes, and people in North Africa, Asia, Australia, and Oceania.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/08/2003
Babylonian Mathematics
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This unit looks at Babylonian mathematics. You will learn how a series of discoveries have enabled historians to decipher stone tablets and study the various techniques the Babylonians used for problem-solving and teaching. The Babylonian problem-solving skills have been described as remarkable and scribes of the time received a training far in advance of anything available in medieval Christian Europe 3000 years later.

Subject:
World History
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Ceramics: A Vessel into History -- Lesson 1
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CC BY
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This is the first lesson in a sequential unit. Students view ceramic vessels from different time periods and cultures and discuss their meanings, functions, and original contexts. They develop criteria for value and meaning of these objects, and create a timeline to situate the objects in history.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
Ceramics: A Vessel into History -- Lesson 2
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CC BY
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This lesson is part of a sequential unit. Students are tested on what they learned about the history of ceramic forms in "Ceramics: A Vessel into History -- Lesson 1." They start work on a personal clay vessel that has a specific use or meaning in their contemporary culture, which could be discerned through study by future archeologists and art historians.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
Ceramics: A Vessel into History -- Lesson 3
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CC BY
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This lesson is part of a sequential unit. Students begin work on a ceramic vessel, which they designed in "Ceramics: A Vessel into History -- Lesson 2." They discuss their artistic choices and identify elements derived from historical examples, while considering how artists appropriate ideas from earlier artists.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
Ceramics: A Vessel into History -- Lesson 4
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This lesson is part of a sequential unit. Students hold a critique session to evaluate the work of their peers using the criteria for value and meaning they developed in "Ceramics: A Vessel into History -- Lesson 1."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
Codex Conquest
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CC BY-NC
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Codex Conquest teaches students to recognize the most important printed books of Western civilization by their nation, century, genre, and current monetary value. Along the way, students learn world history and the scenarios that influence the shape of collections at institutions. Suiting a variety of curricular objectives and student levels, the game can be tailored to fit subject and time specifications and is accessible to students from high school through graduate school. How deeply students engage with the content of Codex Conquest depends on your pedagogy.

Subject:
Literature
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Provider:
University of Iowa
Author:
Amy Hildreth Chen
Edward Raber
Hannah Scates Kettler
Heidi Wiren Bartlett
Michelle Chesner
Serina Sulentic
Date Added:
05/19/2022
A Comprehensive Outline Of World History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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A textbook that covers major events from the beginning of time until 1900. The text is divided first by time period and then by region and country within the period. Learn about the following topics in this world history textbook:Ice Age, Neanderthals, Mesolithic Age, Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age,  Ancient Egypt, Greek Empire, Roman Empire, Nomads, Han Dynasty, Mayan Empire, Byzantine Empire, Dark Ages, Barbarians, Turkish Empire, Viking Empire, Vikings, Charlemagne, Classical Period, Middle Ages, Mongol Empire, Genghis Khan, Black Death, Plague, Colonization, America, Pilgrims, Ottoman Empire, American Revolution, Industrial Revolution, Reconstruction, Renaissance, Age of Discovery, Elizabethan Era, Reformation Era, Age of Enlightenment. Suggested Level: UP (Upper Primary)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Jack E. Maxfield
Date Added:
02/09/2018
Confucianism Explained
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
5.0 stars

This video explains the teachings of Confucius. Education is the path to moral excellence, which is central to building a harmonious society. Education is a lifelong process and the purpose of learning is to acquire virtues.

Subject:
Philosophy
Religious Studies
World Cultures
History
Ancient History
World History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
07/09/2020
Conversations with History: A Dialogue on the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process, with Yossi Beilin and Faisel Al Husseini
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In this 1998 interview, Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Faisal Husseini, one of the leading figures in the Palestinian national movement and Yossi Beilin, a leading Israeli political figure, for a discussion of how their mutual dialogue set in motion the Oslo Peace Accord. Both Husseini and Beilin talk about their lives and how their perceptions of the other took an important turn toward peace. (50 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
09/16/2002
Conversations with History: Britain and America and the Making of the Modern World
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Conversations with History host Harry Kreisler welcomes Walter Russell Mead of the Council on Foreign Relations for a discussion of the Anglo American maritime system—its origins, development, and impact on the world. The conversation touches on the unique synergy between Protestant religion and capitalism, the consolidation of Anglo American power in the process of transforming the international system, the importance of culture in international politics, and the need for a dialogue of civilizations in the 21st century. (57 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
World Cultures
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
01/07/2007
Conversations with History: Iraq and the Lessons of the Peloponnesian War, with Victor Davis Hanson
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Conversations Host Harry Kreisler welcomes historian and classicist Victor Davis Hanson for a discussion of the Peloponnesian War and its lessons for today. He compares that conflict with the war in Iraq. He talks about imperial ambition, the conflict between civilizations, and military power as an instrument to achieve democratization in the struggle between modernity and tradition. (53 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
06/06/2010
Conversations with History: Money and Power, with Niall Ferguson
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Host Harry Kreisler welcomes British historian Niall Ferguson for a discussion of the dynamics of money and power in international politics, the British Empire, and the U.S. role in world affairs. (56 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
06/15/2008
Conversations with History: Reflections on Empire, Nationalism and Globalization, with Kenneth D. Kaunda
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes His Excellency Kenneth D. Kaunda, the First President of Zambia (1964-1991). President Kaunda discusses the national and international challenges he confronted as a national leader. He also reflects on his current work with NGOs in the global fight to fight disease, poverty and inequality. (54 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Sociology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
01/10/2007
Conversations with History: Reflections on a Life in War and Peace, with Sir Brian Urquhart
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Former United Nations secretary General Sir Brian Urquhart in conversation with UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler looks back on his distinguished career as a soldier, diplomat, and international statesman. (57 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
03/20/2000
Conversations with History: The War of the World, with Niall Ferguson
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Harvard historian Niall Ferguson for a discussion of his book ŇThe War of the World.Ó Ferguson analyzes the role of ethnic conflict, economic volatility, and the decline of empires in making the twentieth century the most violent one in human history. (57 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
12/26/2010
Debating the Bomb
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CC BY
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Students will research how the development of the atomic bomb affected people in World War II, participate in a debate about the bomb's use, and investigate how it has affected people's lives since 1945.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
The Early Middle Ages, 284-1000
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Major developments in the political, social, and religious history of Western Europe from the accession of Diocletian to the feudal transformation. Topics include the conversion of Europe to Christianity, the fall of the Roman Empire, the rise of Islam and the Arabs, the "Dark Ages," Charlemagne and the Carolingian renaissance, and the Viking and Hungarian invasions.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Paul H. Freedman
Date Added:
04/30/2012
Early Muslim Civilizations (622-1629) Unit (9th Grade World Studies)
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Mini-Unit Rationale:In this unit, the content to be covered will all fall under the subheading of early Muslim Civilizations. Previously the students have studied early river valley civilizations such as in the Fertile Crescent, the Indus River Valley, the Americas, the Huang River Valley and the Nile River Valley. The students will be able to use their previous knowledge of the basic constructs of a civilization to build upon the content in this chapter (10) that outlines the creation, spread and division of the Muslim political and religious empires of the Middle East. This mini-unit will lead students to the next mini-unit, which covered the spread of Islam into South and Southeast Asia through religious, cultural and political diffusion among other varying factors.This mini-unit will consist of five 45-minute lessons to be taught to a college-prep level freshman World Studies course in a private, co-educational Catholic high school classroom. There are sixteen students in the class, of varying academic abilities. Some students in the general education class have 504 accommodation plans and two have IEP’s, but they are grouped heterogeneously into this social studies course with all college-prep level students. The school is a 1 to 1 school, and all students have iPads with Ebook textbooks, internet capability, QR code readers and the whole slate of Google Apps downloaded onto their tablets. The students will all have multiple new applications downloaded onto their iPads prior to this mini-unit, and will learn how to use them during tutorial portions within this mini-unit.Overall Goal:This mini-unit is designed to help students develop as historical thinkers, critical thinkers, and digital citizens through the lens of analyzing the origins, division and spread of early Muslim civilizations.Overall Objectives:1. Students will be able to... identify the prophet of Islam, Muhammad, and explain how his teachings spread the Islamic beliefs throughout the Middle East and eventually, the world.2. Students will be able to... explain how Islam affected all aspects of religious and secular society for Muslims, and how this led to advancements and innovation in many parts of the world.3. Students will be able to... explain the divisions that emerged within Islam and the differences between their major beliefs.4. Students will be able to... explain the rise of the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphates and how those empires affected the Middle East and the surrounding lands.5. Students will be able to… read and understand detailed maps and virtual reality images of the important historical sites of Mecca and Medina, and explain their significance to the rise and spread of Islam.Overall Standards:NCSS Standards Strands:Time, Continuity and Change: Evaluate the impact of the institutions, values, and beliefs of people in the past on important historical decisions and developments, and compare different interpretations of the causes and consequences of these decisions and developments.Individuals, Groups and Institutions: Evaluate different interpretations of the influence of groups and institutions on people and events in historical and contemporary settings.Individuals, Groups and Institutions: Analyze examples of tensions between belief systems and governmental actions and policies.Power, Authority and Governance: Examine persistent issues involving the rights, responsibilities, roles, and status of individuals and groups in relation to the general welfare.Global Connections: Describe and explain conditions and motivations that contribute to conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups, societies, and nations.CSDE Common Core Social Studies Standards:GEO 6–7.2 Use maps, satellite images, photographs, and other representations to explain relationships between the locations of places and regions, and changes in their environmental characteristics.GEO 6–7.3 Explain how cultural patterns and economic decisions influence environments and the daily lives of people.GEO 6–7.4 Analyze the cultural and environmental characteristics that make places both similar to and different from one another.GEO 6–7.5 Explain the connections between the physical and human characteristics of a region and the identity of individuals and cultures living there.CIV 6–7.1 Explain specific roles played by citizens (such as voters, jurors, taxpayers, members of the armed forces, petitioners, protesters, and officeholders).CIV 6–7.3 Compare historical and contemporary means of changing societies and promoting the common good.HIST 6–8.1 Use questions about historically significant people or events to explain the impact on a region.INQ 9–12.5: Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of view represented in the sources, the types of sources available, and the potential uses of the sources.Connecticut Common Core Literacy Standards:CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.CCSS.ELA Literacy and Reading RH.11-12.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.Diocese of Bridgeport Standards:Historical Thinking: Students will develop historical thinking skills, including chronological thinking and recognizing change over time; contextualizing, comprehending and analyzing historical literature; researching historical sources; understanding competing narratives and interpretation; and constructing narratives and interpretation.Diocese of Bridgeport Historical Thinking Skills:Skill 1: Trace the emergence and decline of Muslim civilizations.Skill 2: Explain how geography and history are linked.Skill 3: Describe the tenets of Islam.Skill 4: Analyze the reason for the division of Islam.Skill 5: Evaluate the role of religion in the development of the Muslim empires in the Middle East.Skill 6: Describe the major characteristics of Muslim empires.Skill 7: Describe examples of cultural diffusion from the Muslim Empires.Skill 8: Describe the characteristics and advances of the Golden Age of Islam.Local, United States and World History: Students will use historical thinking skills to develop an understanding of the major historical periods, issues and trends in United States history, world history, and Connecticut and local history.Historical Themes: Students will apply their understanding of historical periods, issues and trends to examine such historical themes as ideals, beliefs and instructions; conflict and conflict resolution; human movement and interaction; and science and technology in order to understand how the world came to be the way it is.Applying History: Students will recognize the continuing importance of historical thinking and historical knowledge in their own lives and in the world in which they live.ISTE Net Standards for Students:Empowered Learner: 1C: Students use technology to seek feedback that informs and improves their practice and to demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways.1D: Students understand the fundamental concepts of technology operations, demonstrate the ability to choose, use and troubleshoot current technologies and are able to transfer their knowledge to explore emerging technologies.Digital Citizen: 2B: Students engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behavior when using technology, including social interactions online or when using networked devices.2C: Students demonstrate an understanding of and respect for the rights and obligations of using and sharing intellectual property.Knowledge Constructor: 3A: Students plan and employ effective research strategies to locate information and other resources for their intellectual or creative pursuits.3C: Students curate information from digital resources using a variety of tools and methods to create collections of artifacts that demonstrate meaningful connections or conclusions.Innovative Designer: 4A: Students know and use a deliberate design process for generating ideas, testing theories, creating innovative artifacts or solving authentic problems.Creative Communicator: 6B: Students create original works or responsibly repurpose or remix digital resources into new creations.6C: Students communicate complex ideas clearly and effectively by creating or using a variety of digital objects such as visualizations, models or simulations.6D: Students publish or present content that customizes the message and medium for their intended audiences.Global Collaborator: 7B: Students use collaborative technologies to work with others, including peers, experts or community members, to examine issues and problems from multiple viewpoints.7C: Students contribute constructively to project teams, assuming various roles and responsibilities to work effectively toward a common goal.7D: Students explore local and global issues and use collaborative technologies to work with others to investigate solutions.Overall Unit Assessments:Formative Assessments: Teacher will monitor student progress by circulating and assessing student on-task behavior while providing immediate feedback and redirection if necessary.Teacher will check daily student progress via student-group Google Doc sheets.Students will take various Google Forms formative assessments to gauge their individual understanding of the content knowledge, as well as reflect on their collaboration and participation in lesson activities.Answer Garden formative assessment will be posed to gauge their individual understanding of the content knowledge, as well as reflect on their collaboration and participation in lesson activities.Students will participate in interactive Kahoot Quizzes to help both teacher and student understand individual real-time comprehension levels.Summative Assessments:Students will create an original telecast in small groups of three to display their knowledge and understanding of the Umayyad and Abbasid Empires and/or the Golden Age of Muslim Civilization, and this mini-unit overall.Students will take a summative assessment at the end of Chapter 11 (after multiple mini-units are completed) in the form of a pen-to-paper Unit test.Summary of Mini-Unit:Students will begin this unit by learning about the context of the time period, and the geography of the land and cities from where the early Muslim civilizations emanated. Then, they will learn about the major tenets of Islam and a religion and Muslims as a culture and the political systems of the early empires. Next, students will analyze the origins and spread of conflict that lead to the division of Islam into the two major sects of the religion: Sunni and Shi’a. Finally, students will learn about the Umayyad and Abbasid empires and analyze their contributions to society and culture in the Middle East, as well as trace the emergence and decline of those Muslim empires.Technology Rationale:The 9th grade students will be using various technologies each day of this mini-unit, ranging from iPad applications, to QR codes, to engaging Smart-board technology. The integration of technology into this mini-unit will optimize students’ learning experience by encouraging student collaboration, providing innovative ways of communicating their own ideas, and engaging students as global citizens who demonstrate an understanding of digital citizenship and proper use of technology in an academic setting. Some of the technologies used by the teacher and students are included to streamline the transition process and create a paperless classroom environment, which will provide many benefits for the class and even transcend the classroom, such as environmental and economical.

Subject:
Ancient History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Rebecca Corso
Date Added:
07/21/2017
Eid al-Fitr
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Educational Use
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In this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, learn how Muslims in America celebrate Eid al-Fitr, the Ű_í_Ű__Ű_ŒŰ_ŒŒŰ‹_Feast of Breaking the Fast.Ű_í_Ű__Ű_ŒŰ_ŒŰ_í_Ű_Œ

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
5.0 stars

This video offers a summary and analysis of the main themes in the Epic of Gilgamesh. The world’s first recorded epic poem, from Mesopotamia, explores important questions: can humans defy aging and conquer death?

Subject:
Literature
World Cultures
Ancient History
World History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
08/08/2020
Remix
Exploration Station Rotation
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
4.0 stars

There are many different topics within exploration that students have some background information with.  Topics like the Atlantic Slave Trade and the Columbian Exchange are parts of history that students either have background knowledge on or they are easy for students to grasp.  However, there are other topics, like mercantilism and triangular trade, that students struggle with.  This lesson is designed to be done in an 80-minute period (or more), or over the course of two days.  It allows students some autonomy to work on their own, and to take the notes that they need, but also allows the teacher to lead a portion of the lesson and clarify any quesitons that might arise.

Subject:
Educational Technology
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jessica Dowell
Date Added:
05/31/2018
Exploring Religious America
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Educational Use
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In this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, learn about Muslims in Lawrenceville, Georgia, their plans to build an Islamic cemetery and the stiff objections from their Christian neighbors.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Family History: Push and Pull Factors of Immigration
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Steve Haller for AP World History; Adaptable to other grades. In this project, students interview a family member about why they immigrated to the United States (or a person who might know the story). The student then places this story into world history and explains the push and pull factors that the family experienced. The student will be writing a biography for the family member in a historical context.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/30/2019
Family Immigration History Project
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Summary/ Description Overview:
Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Nancy Condon for her Grade 10 US History course; Adaptable to World History and to other grades. The goal of this scaffolded project is for students to research their own family immigration history looking into the reasons they left their home country and why they chose to settle in the United States. The project requires the student to do multiple stages of research, including an interview, origin country research, US research, and geographic research before handing in a final project in a choice of format – essay, poster board or website – to connect family immigration, and US History to world history events.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/30/2019
Family & Neighborhood History Project
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Judith Jeremie for her AP World History course; Adaptable to other grades. This assignment asks students to make meaningful connections between the past and their family/neighborhood history by conducting an interview of / researching a relative, gathering and organizing evidence of a historical moment / theme that has impacted that relative, and presenting their findings through art (graphic novel/ comic strips) or writing (narrative/poem).

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/30/2019
Global Perspectives on Industrialization
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course will focus on the emergence and evolution of industrial societies around the world. The student will begin by comparing the legacies of industry in ancient and early modern Europe and Asia and examining the agricultural and commercial advances that laid the groundwork for the Industrial Revolution. The student will then follow the history of industrialization in different parts of the world, taking a close look at the economic, social, and environmental effects of industrialization. This course ultimately examines how industrialization developed, spread across the globe, and shaped everyday life in the modern era. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify key ideas and events in the history of industrialization; identify connections between the development of capitalism and the development of modern industry; use analytical tools to evaluate the factors contributing to industrial change in different societies; identify the consequences of industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries in different societies; critique historical interpretations of the causes and effects of industrialization; and analyze and interpret primary source documents describing the process of industrialization and life in industrial societies. (History 363)

Subject:
World History
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Global Warming: The Developing World
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Educational Use
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This video segment adapted from NOVA/FRONTLINE looks at the future of global warming as developing nations, including India and China, increase their need for energy.

Subject:
Engineering
World History
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2004
Hajj - Part I
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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In this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, meet an American Muslim as he prepares for Hajj, the pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca that commemorates the Abrahamic roots of Islam.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Hajj - Part II
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Educational Use
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Performed with over two million other Muslims, the rites of Hajj, the required pilgrimage to Mecca, have a profound personal impact on each pilgrim. In this video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, a Muslim from America experiences Hajj for the first time.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Hajj - Part III
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students learn about an American Muslim's impressions of his first pilgrimage to Mecca in this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008