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Building Religious Tolerance Through Buildings
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In this experiential, arts-integrated unit, students explore the historical significance of religious buildings in order to understand the ways in which architecture reflects cultural belief systems.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Dina Moskowitz
Amina Sheikh
Daniel Rinehart
Date Added:
01/20/2017
Christian Parables teaching resource
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Christian Parables is a resource for use by school teachers that has been developed as part of Dr Naomi Appleton and Dr Alison Jack’s project Approaching Religion Through Story at the University of Edinburgh School of Divinity.

Structured to meet Education Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence standard for Religious Moral Education (RME), the resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story.

The file contains six parables in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to parables.

Resources provided as part of the project ‘Approaching Religion Through Story’ are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International Licence.

Subject:
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
University of Edinburgh
Provider Set:
Open.Ed
Author:
Dr Alison Jack
Dr Naomi Appleton
Date Added:
07/06/2017
The Christian Roots of Europe
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For the most part recorded on site in places such as Subiaco, Montecassino, Assis, San Casciano, Florence and Rome in June of 2013, the documentary we present here was produced and then broadcasted by the State Television of Portugal on December 24, 2013 (RTP2) and January 2, 2014 (RTP1). The Program was produced for RTP1 by the Journalist Fátima Campos Ferreira and the Reporter of Image Carlos Oliveira under the scientific advice of João J. Vila-Chã, professor for Philosophy at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. The documentary was particularly enriched by the contribution of Professor Joseph Weiler, President of the European University Institute in Florence, and was edited by Alexandre Leandro, chief-editor at the RTP. Originally titled (in Portuguese) «O Triunfo do Espírito», the documentary was conceived as (a rather unusual form of) narrative about (the Idea of) Europe and out of the recognition that for the present as for the future of the world a confront remains unavoidable with the cultural and the religious dimension of the Idea of Europe as we know it through the media of our cultural (and philosophical) history. We are grateful to all the Institutions that in places such as Subiaco, Montecassino, Assis, Florence, San Casciano and Rome allowed the team sent by the RTP to Italy to realize the work as intended and so contributed in a decisive way to this particular (and somehow peculiar) narrative about the Idea of Europe.

Subject:
Religious Studies
History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Pontifical Gregorian University
Date Added:
12/24/2013
Christian Terms in Arabic
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This site offers a brief list of words that relate to Christianity, including a number of terms that are specific to Christianity as it is practiced in the Middle East. Many of the words are accompanied by brief explanations of their significance. The glossary is preceded by a brief introduction.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Translation Directory
Author:
Wikipedia
Date Added:
10/14/2013
Debunking Stereotypes About Muslims and Islam
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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Many religions have things in common. At the same time, each is unique. In the shared category, Islam, like Christianity and Judaism, descends from the first five books of the Bible. That’s why some people refer to members of all three religions as “followers of the Book.” Some people also call the three religions “Abrahamic” because they all descended from Abraham. In the unique category, Jews were the first to believe that there was one God; Muslims believe that Muhammad was God’s messenger and Christians believe that Jesus Christ was the Messiah.

In the same way that religions are both alike and unique, so, too are the members of those religions. In this activity, students learn more about Muslims in the United States and practice graph-reading skills.

Subject:
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
12/02/2016
Divining America: Religion in American History
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
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The National Humanities center presents this collection of essays by leading scholars on the topic 'Divining America: Religion in American History'. The Essays explore religion in America in the 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. The essays consider Native American religion, African American Christianity, the American Jewish experience, Mormonism, Catholicism, and Islam. They explore religious movements such as the Great Awakenings, the missionary movement, abolitionism, and fundamentalism. Topics like deism, pluralism, church and state separation, Manifest Destiny, and the Christian Right are also examined.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
America In Class
Date Added:
01/07/2013
Dying to be a Martyr
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The Middle East conflict and terrorism are issues we hear about almost daily in the news. This lesson will use video clips from WIDE ANGLE's 'Suicide Bombers' (2004), Internet sites, and primary sources to examine the roots of the Middle East conflict. The video contains interviews with young Palestinians who participated -- or intended to participate -- in suicide bombings. These young Palestinians share the personal, religious, political and emotional reasons behind their participation in these suicide operations. This lesson could be used to review information about the three major monotheistic religions and their connections to Israel, to relate post-World War II policies to the current political state of the Middle East, and/or to get students to understand the roots of the terrorism that threatens the world we live in.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Thirteen/WNET New York
Provider Set:
WIDE ANGLE: Window into Global History
Author:
Heather Auletta
Date Added:
05/19/2006
English Language Arts, Grade 12
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CC BY-NC
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The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Things Fall Apart
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In our lives, we are constantly telling stories to ourselves and to others in an attempt to both understand our experiences and present our best selves to others.  But how do we tell a story about ourselves that is both true and positive? How do we hold ourselves up in the best possible light, while still being honest about our struggles and our flaws? Students will explore ways of interpreting and portraying personal experiences.  They'll read Chinua Achebe's novel Things Fall Apart , analyzing the text through the eyes of one character. They'll get to know that character's flaws and strengths, and they'll tell part of the story from that character's perspective, doing their best to tell an honest tale that presents their character's best side. Then they'll explore their own stories, crafting a personal narrative about an important moment of learning in his or her life.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and analyze Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart , viewing the events and conflicts of the novel through the eyes of one of the central characters.
Students write a two-part narrative project: one narrative told through their character’s perspective and one personal narrative about an incident in their own life.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How do our conflicts shape and show our character?
How can we tell a story about ourselves that’s both honest and positive?
How do definitions of justice change depending on the culture you live in?
What are ways individuals can react to a changing world? To a community that doesn’t accept us?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Things Fall Apart, The Big Questions, Debating The Fairness Of The Umuofian Society
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will debate the fairness of Umuofian society and whether anything needs changing. They will remain in character, ensuring that all sides of the issue are fully explored and defended.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Things Fall Apart, The Big Questions, Exploring The Impact Of Colonialism
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will create found poems—poems using language from the novel itself—to explore the impact that colonialism has on people’s self-esteem, and on the Igbo people in particular.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
The Five Major World Religions
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CC BY-NC-SA
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It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam. Lesson by John Bellaimey, animation by TED-Ed.

Subject:
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Date Added:
03/15/2021
Intermediate Biblical Greek Reader: Galatians and Related Texts
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CC BY
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After completing basic biblical Greek, students are often eager to continue to learn and strengthen their skills of translation and interpretation. This intermediate graded reader is designed to meet those needs. The reader is “intermediate” in the sense that it presumes the user will have already learned the basics of Greek grammar and syntax and has memorized Greek vocabulary words that appear frequently in the New Testament. The reader is “graded” in the sense that it moves from simpler translation work (Galatians) towards more advanced readings from the book of James, the Septuagint, and from one of the Church Fathers. In each reading lesson, the Greek text is given, followed by supplemental notes that offer help with vocabulary, challenging word forms, and syntax. Discussion questions are also included to foster group conversation and engagement. There are many good Greek readers in existence, but this reader differs from most others in a few important ways. Most readers offer text selections from different parts of the Bible, but in this reader the user works through one entire book (Galatians). All subsequent lessons, then, build off of this interaction with Galatians through short readings that are in some way related to Galatians. The Septuagint passages in the reader offer some broader context for texts that Paul quotes explicitly from the Septuagint. The Patristic reading from John Chrysystom comes from one of his homilies on Galatians. This approach to a Greek reader allows for both variety and coherence in the learning process.

Subject:
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
George Fox University Library
Author:
Jonah M. Sandford
Nijay K. Gupta
Date Added:
01/01/2018
Introducing Africa
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Introducing Africa is comprised of two lessons and is designed to raise studentsĚ_Ě_´ awareness about stereotypes of Africa; teach them information about the history, geography, economics and cultures of Africa; and to give them an appreciation for the diversity of the African continent. This kit will teach students to identify important details, make logical inferences, and draw informed conclusions from visual documents including photographs and money. The lesson was designed for third grade but can be used with older students.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Chris Sperry
Date Added:
04/23/2013
Introduction to New Testament History and Literature
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course provides a historical study of the origins of Christianity by analyzing the literature of the earliest Christian movements in historical context, concentrating on the New Testament. Although theological themes will occupy much of our attention, the course does not attempt a theological appropriation of the New Testament as scripture. Rather, the importance of the New Testament and other early Christian documents as ancient literature and as sources for historical study will be emphasized. A central organizing theme of the course will focus on the differences within early Christianity (-ies).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Dale B. Martin
Date Added:
02/16/2011
The King James Bible Lecture Series
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CC BY
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Manifold greatness: Oxford Celebrations of the King James Bible 1611-2011. Lecture series held in Corpus Christi College to celebrate the 400th Anniversary of the first publication of the King James Bible.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Chris Patten
Diarmaid MacCulloch
Helen Wilcox
Melvyn Bragg
Pauline Croft
Terrence Wright
Valentine Cunningham
Date Added:
08/25/2011
Looking at Illuminated Manuscripts: Illuminating Fables
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CC BY
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Students will examine a manuscript page from a Flemish bestiary and discuss how it was used to teach ideas about Christianity. Students will then compare the stories from the bestiary to the fables of Aesop, and culminate with the creation of their own manuscript based on a fable by Aesop.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
Philosophy of Religion Series
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This series of eight audio lectures delivered by Dr T. J. Mawson at the University of Oxford in Hilary Term 2011, introduces the main philosophical arguments pertaining to the Western monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Each lecture has an associated hand-out (two for the first lecture).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
T. J. Mawson
Date Added:
05/02/2012
Religion among Teens: A Data-Driven Learning Guide
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This is a learning module that uses data to investigates the relationship between demographic and sociocultural factors and religiosity among high school students in the United States.

Subject:
Religious Studies
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachingWithData.org
Provider Set:
TeachingWithData.org
Author:
ICPSR
Date Added:
11/07/2014