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  • Civil Rights Movement
African American History: From Emancipation to the Present
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The purpose of this course is to examine the African American experience in the United States from 1863 to the present. Prominent themes include the end of the Civil War and the beginning of Reconstruction; African Americans' urbanization experiences; the development of the modern civil rights movement and its aftermath; and the thought and leadership of Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X. WARNING: Some of the lectures in this course contain graphic content and/or adult language that some users may find disturbing.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Jonathan Holloway
Date Added:
04/30/2012
Baseball, Race and Ethnicity: Rounding the Bases
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Students use primary sources focused on baseball to explore the American experience regarding race and ethnicity. The unit should be used when studying the World War II era and the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Bus Boycott: Historical Documents Highlight Integration Milestone
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Educational Use
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This collection of primary resources and corresponding activities sheds light on the endurance of peaceful protesters in Montgomery, Ala., who overturned an unjust law.

Subject:
Education
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
02/20/2013
The Civil Rights Movement
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In 1948, President Harry Truman took an early step towards civil rights reform by issuing Executive Order 9981, which eliminated racial segregation in the military. After World War II, African Americans ? then often called Negroes or "coloreds," began to mobilize against discrimination. They demanded an end to segregation and fought for equality in education, housing, and employment opportunities. The images in this topic show that by the 1960s, their struggle ? which began in the segregated South ? had reached California. As a number of photographs in this topic show, many Californians showed their support for Civil Rights activists and victims of racial discrimination in the South by holding marches, rallies, and demonstrations urging equality for African Americans. In one image three white children in San Francisco hold a sign in support of the four young black girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Photographs also show people in San Francisco boycotting Kress and Woolworth's department stores, sites of racial discrimination in the South. Documents shown here include a flyer urging the boycott of the stores; and a Western Union telegram sent in 1963, stating that Civil Rights activists Roy Wilkins and Medgar Evers were arrested attempting to picket Woolworth's in Jackson, Mississippi. Two photographs of memorials for slain civil rights leaders ? a march in honor Medgar Evers in 1963, in Los Angeles, and a memorial in the San Francisco Bay Area for Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968 ? show racially mixed crowds in attendance. But not all Californians sympathized with the Civil Rights movement. Images of racial hatred and prejudice are reflected in the photograph of an African American woman holding a rock that had been thrown through an office window, and Klu Klux Klan graffiti spray-painted on a home. Various groups formed to fight in the struggle for equal rights. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), formed in 1909, entered a new phase during this period, leading in the organized struggle for civil rights. An example of how the NAACP communicated about events is reflected in a letter from the Alameda County branch of the NAACP on June 13, 1950, which reported segregation on the Southern Pacific Railroad trains leaving Los Angeles. A flyer promoting the boycott of California grapes exemplifies NAACP support for other rights movements, in this case the United Farm Workers. Other flyers urged Californians to fight sharecropper wages and "Keep Mississippi Out of California." Groups such as the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and student groups also protested segregation and incidents of racial discrimination in the South. Several important African American leaders ? including Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Thurgood Marshall, and Ralph Abernathy ? all came to California, as documented by photographs included here. Sometimes, the price of fighting for social justice was high. Two images capture events held for leaders in the social justice movement who were assassinated: the 1963 memorial march in Los Angeles for civil rights leader Medgar Evers; and a crowd attending a Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Rally in honor of the slain civil rights leader.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Conversations with History: Lessons of the Civil Rights Movement, with Thelton Henderson, Jr.
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Judge Thelton Henderson for a discussion of the U.S. civil rights movement and its implications for international law. (43 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
06/07/2009
Documentary Photography: Civil Rights Through Image and Text
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Students will learn about the juxtaposition of image and text to define the social and psychological mood of the civil rights movement in the United States.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
Entering History: Nikki Giovanni and Martin Luther King, Jr.
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Some Rights Reserved
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Nikki Giovanni's poem 'The Funeral of Martin Luther King, Jr.' is paired with Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, taking students on a quest through time to the Civil Rights movement.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
10/02/2013
Fannie Lou Hamer and the Civil Rights Movement in Rural Mississippi
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Fannie Lou Hamer and the civil rights movement in rural Mississippi. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Jamie Lathan
Date Added:
04/11/2016
The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
The Freedom Riders
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students will use a primary source—an NBC news report from 1961—to investigate the Freedom Rides. The lesson will also explore segregation in the South and the tenets of nonviolent protest.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
12/02/2016
Freedom's Story: Teaching African American Literature and History
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
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The National Humanities center presents this collection of essays by leading scholars on the topic ŇFreedomŐs Story: Teaching African American Literature and HistoryÓ. Topics include the affect of slavery on families, slave resistance, how to read slave narratives, Frederick Douglass, reconstruction, segregation, pigmentocracy, protest poetry, jazz, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and more.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
America In Class
Date Added:
01/07/2013
James Baldwin: Art, Sexuality and Civil Rights
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students will revisit the life of James Baldwin, an African-American literary writer and critic, as well as an icon for civil and gay rights. Far ahead of his time, Baldwin was "out and proud" before that term became a popular cultural idiom. Baldwin's life illuminates not just the intersection between gay rights and civil rights, but perhaps even more importantly, the connections among self-identification, artistic expression and political activism. This lesson is part of "The Role of Gay Men and Lesbians in the Civil Rights Movement" Series.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
02/20/2013
The Little Rock Nine and the Children’s Movement
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students will learn about the nine African-American students who integrated Little Rock’s Central High School in 1957. They will also explore the price the Little Rock Nine paid as they created history, as well as the controversies surrounding Daisy Bates and her role in the movement. They will also develop an awareness of the important role the Little Rock Nine played in the civil rights movement and how they inspired the activism of other youth in the Black Freedom Struggle.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
11/29/2016
The Making of African American Identiy Volume 3, 1917-1968: Primary Sources
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
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The National Humanities center presents reading guides with primary source materials for the study of The Making of African American Identity, Volume 3: 1917-1968. Primary source materials include essays, articles, plays, poems, paintings, fiction, letters, songs, cartoons, interviews, memoirs, video clips, and more. Sources are divided into the topics: Segregation, Migrations, Protest, Community, and ŇOvercome?Ó

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
America In Class
Date Added:
01/07/2013
March on Washington: Teaching Suggestions
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The 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement's 1963 March on Washington is a great teaching opportunity. We offer some helpful resources.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Date Added:
09/27/2013
Media Constructions of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This kit explores the ways in which King and his legacy have been portrayed in various media forms. The first lesson follows a chronology of King's life through interactive decoding of rich media documents (comic books, billboards, songs, music videos, etc.). The following lessons use excerpts of Dr. King's speeches from 1963, 1967 and 1968 to examine his views on social change; explore the portrayal of King in magazine covers, advertisements, Web sites, film clips and monuments; and use letters to the editor about celebrating King to explore challenges to change.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Andrea Volckmar
Barry Derfel
Chris
Christopher Carey
Cyndy Scheibe
Eric Acree
Faith Rogow
Kim Fontana
Lauren Trichon
Moira Lang
Robin Rosoff
Sox Sperry
Sperry
Tanya Saunders
Date Added:
04/30/2013