Updating search results...

Search Resources

86 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Anthropology
ANTH101: Free textbook and hub for teaching cultural anthropology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

* a free alternative to expensive Introduction to Cultural Anthropology textbooks

* includes a full textbook and several original videos

* includes 10 "challenges" (assignments)

* a hub of original and found resources for teaching and learning anthropology

* a “connected course” of many faculty around the world sharing instructional materials

* an open course freely available to anyone online

* an emerging producer of original anthropological videos and other digital content

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Michael Wesch
Ryan Klataske
Tom Woodward
Date Added:
08/16/2018
ANTH 106 American Mosaic
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

In this class, we will explore America's diversity through questions of immigration, race, gender/sexuality and class--some of the major ways our culture is organized. It is comprised of 9 lessons based on online resources, plus 2 auto-ethnography assignments. This class was originally taught by Huma Mohibullah at Renton Technical College. 

Subject:
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Higher Education
U.S. History
Anthropology
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Module
Reading
Author:
Di Zhang
Youth High School Completion Renton Techincal College
Date Added:
05/23/2022
ANTH 234 Religion and Culture
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Religion is a significant aspect of human cultures everywhere. In these lessons, we explore questions such as: What are the main elements of religion? Why is believing in a higher power important to human beings across cultures? How is religion related to our social orders? How is religion related to the politics of today's world?This resource is comprised of 7 lessons based on online modules, plus a final presentation assignment. Each lesson includes a discussion or written assignment. This class was originally taught by Huma Mohibullah at Renton Technical College. 

Subject:
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Anthropology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Module
Reading
Author:
Di Zhang
Youth High School Completion Renton Techincal College
Date Added:
05/23/2022
Afghan Poppies, Climate Change and War: Thinking Systemically About Us and Them
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This contemplative practice inquires into the complex web of interdependencies linking global climate change, the War on Terror, Afghan poppy production, opiate addiction, and food security through the lens of systems theory. The exercise challenges students to consider these linkages not only conceptually but also somatically and emotionally.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Environmental Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Agriculture
Environmental Studies
Biology
Anthropology
Economics
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Karen Litfin
Date Added:
12/01/2021
Ancient Nubia - Unit Overview
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

These educational videos provide an invaluable resource on Ancient Nubia for Middle and High School Ancient World History and Geography teachers and students. The video content aligns with Geography, Economics, Civics, and Historical Thinking Social Studies standards across the nation. Key concepts and inquiry skills from each content area weave seamlessly throughout the videos and associated lesson plans. This unit overview document links to developed resources on the Archeology in the Community site.

Subject:
World Cultures
World History
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
Barbara Soots
Kari Tally
Jerry Price
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
08/24/2022
Anthropology Mini Lectures: A collective resource for online teaching in the time of COVID19
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This is a collection of mini lectures created by anthropologists and those in conversation with anthropology as supplimental material to assist college and university instructors who were made to shift their courses online because of COVID19.For more information, see here.To contribute, please create an OER author account and send your name and OER registered email to AnthropologyTeaching@gmail.com.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Zoe Wool
Brett Hill
Lauren Visconti
Geir Henning Presterudstuen
Laura Ogden
Jonathan Padwe
Sabra Thorner
Flosha Diliena Liyana Saran Arachchige Don
Heikki Wilenius
Jonathan Wald
Noah Theriault
Rosalyn Bold
Andrew Flachs
Emily Yates-Doerr
Rebecca Lester
Katrina Thompson
Emily Hammerl
Rose Wellman
Devin Proctor
Daniel Souleles
Kim de Rijke
Maira Hayat
Kate Fischer
Laura Story Johnson
Chloe Ahmann
Paige West
Date Added:
03/15/2020
Anthropology: World Archaeology Syllabus
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

ANTH 150 World Archaeology
Introduction to archaeology and cultural change from the earliest times to the advent of state-level societies.

Course Description:
• When did we become fully modern humans?
• When (and why) did we stop being hunter-gatherers?
• When did inequality emerge?
• Why did some people decide to start living in cities?
• What led to the development of complex state-level
societies?
These are important questions about what it means to
be human that archaeologists address. In this course,
we’ll consider these topics while providing an
introduction to archaeology and the study of world
prehistory. The course provides an overview of human
prehistory from modern humans up to the
development of literate civilizations. The approach will
be problem oriented and comparative. We will
consider ancient cultures from around the world in
order to foster an appreciation for human cultural
diversity. Explaining why cultural developments
occurred is often hotly debated among archaeologists,
and different perspectives will be explored critically
throughout this course.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Dr. Alison Carter
Date Added:
03/15/2021
Antiquities of Wisconsin as Surveyed and Described by I. A. LAPHAM (1885)
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

The Antiquities of Wisconsin, Increase A. Lapham's most important published work, includes 92 pages of text, illustrated with 61 wood engravings, and 55 lithographed plates and was the result of his research into the Indian effigy mounds found on Wisconsin's Landscape.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Anthropology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
University of Wisconsin
Provider Set:
University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Date Added:
07/05/2013
Becoming Human: How Evolution Made Us
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Becoming Human is a fast-paced, irreverent introduction to evolutionary theory, especially human origins. The book is based on the Open2Study MOOC, 'Becoming Human,' created by Dr. Greg Downey and Open Universities Australia. The book discusses traces of evolution in our bodies, basic evolutionary theory from Darwin to the genomic revolution, sexual selection and reproduction, and how human brain development affects our evolution, including into the future. Copiously illustrated, with some interactive diagrams, videos of Dr. Downey presenting the material are also available through Open2Study.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Enculture Press
Author:
Greg Downey
Date Added:
03/19/2015
Becoming Human: Interactive Documentary
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Becoming Human is an interactive documentary experience that tells the story of human origins. Multimedia, research and scholarship are presented to promote greater understanding of the course of human evolution. This site includes classroom materials, subject-designed exercises, games and activities to help make connections between the concepts that are presented and student learning. PDF versions of the resources may be downloaded from the site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Institute of Human Origins
Provider Set:
Becoming Human
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
08/20/2011
Becoming a Cultural Researcher
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Students learn about material culture in this Moveable Museum lesson plan by taking a firsthand look at how culture influences the kinds of things we do. The 12-page PDF guide has educator materials including background information, teacher strategies, assessment guidelines, and detailed notes about the curriculum standards addressed. The Becoming a Cultural Researcher activity worksheet has a series of questions that prompts students to reflect on the material culture of daily activities, customs, or ceremonies. There is a kid-friendly glossary of related terms.

Subject:
Anthropology
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
10/15/2014
Black Matters: Introduction to Black Studies, Spring 2017
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Interdisciplinary survey of people of African descent that draws on the overlapping approaches of history, literature, anthropology, legal studies, media studies, performance, linguistics, and creative writing. This course connects the experiences of African-Americans and of other American minorities, focusing on social, political, and cultural histories, and on linguistic patterns.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Michel DeGraff
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Cascade Citizens Wildlife Monitoring Project
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This multi-term assignment introduces students to local indigenous stories, significant plants and animals of our region and some basic skills in reading animal tracks and signs.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Environmental Studies
Biology
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Thomas W. Murphy, Edmonds Community College
Date Added:
12/09/2021
Conversations with History: Studying the Human Condition, Habits of a Militant Anthropologist with Nancy Scheper-Hughes
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Nancy Scheper-Hughes, a noted Anthropology Professor at UC Berkeley and author of numerous award-winning works joins UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler. (59 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
01/29/2006
Cookie Subduction
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This is a quick activity that shows how large amounts of rock and sediment are added to the edge of continents during subduction. You may ask, how can such a huge phenomenon be demonstrated quickly and cheaply? The answer is simple: with a cookie!

Subject:
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Exploratorium
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
11/07/2012
The Crayon Rock Cycle
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this activity, learners use crayons to draw conclusions about rocks and the rock cycle. Learners form crayons ((which can be "weathered"--heated, compressed and cooled--like rocks) into models of sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks.

Subject:
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Eric Muller
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
11/07/2004
Cultural Anthropology/Globalization
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this unit, you will explore globalization and development and its effects on indigenous peoples. Modern economic and political development is driven by the assumption that the results will be benefical for all people; however, cultural differences are not taken into consideration, leading often to the destruction of indigenous cultures. Understanding the context of modern development students become versant in the current debate about globalization.

By the end of the unit, you should be able to answer the following questions:

What is globalization?

How did the modern era of globalization develop?

What is the relationship between culture and globalization?

Subject:
Social Science
Anthropology
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Tori Saneda of Cascadia Community College in Bothell
WA.
Date Added:
05/01/2018
Delocalized Diets: Globalization, Food, and Culture
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This assignment addresses cultural sustainability by asking students to go beyond distinguishing between five subsistence strategies to examining the impact of globalization on diet and culture.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Agriculture
Environmental Studies
Biology
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Mary L. Russell, Pierce College
Date Added:
12/09/2021
Did Early Farmers Alter Climate?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The overarching goal of this exercise is for students to explore the early anthropogenic hypothesis, which claims that early agriculture had a substantial impact on greenhouse gases and global climate thousands of years ago (Ruddiman, 2003). Students compare changes in greenhouse gas concentrations that occurred thousands of years ago to more recent changes that occurred over hundreds of years. Students also relate changes in greenhouse gas concentrations to warming. The exercise is completed over a 1.5- to 2-week period as the class covers a chapter on climate change.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Environmental Science
Agriculture
History
Biology
Atmospheric Science
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Sue Swanson
Date Added:
12/08/2020
Double Immunity
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Dr. Stephen O'Brien of the National Cancer Institute discovers a 700-year-old mutation that makes a person resistant to HIV infection. From Evolution: "Evolutionary Arms Race."

Subject:
Life Science
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
Clear Blue Sky Productions
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
09/26/2003
ECHO: Ethnographic, Cultural and Historical Overview of Yukon's First Peoples
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Today, First Nations peoples living in Yukon, Canada are reviving and practicing their cultural traditions in exciting ways. At the same time, there has been an influx of newcomers to the territory who want to learn more about Yukon's Indigenous peoples and their cultures. With hundreds of references for those wanting to delve deeper into particular topics, ECHO is a handbook that provides the most current research pertaining to Yukon First Nations peoples. Topics include archaeology, ethnology, and lifeways, relationships with newcomers (in the past and currently), the arts, and modern-day land claims. The volume also includes interviews with research collaborators who discuss the importance of community-based research. Castillo, Schreyer, and Southwick's solidly researched handbook serves as an important tool, both for teachers and students, seeking accurate information pertaining to the Indigenous cultures of Yukon.

Subject:
World History
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
British Columbia/Yukon Open Authoring Platform
Author:
Christine Schreyer
Tosh Southwick
Victoria Elena Castillo
Date Added:
09/10/2020
Eid al-Fitr
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, learn how Muslims in America celebrate Eid al-Fitr, the Ű_í_Ű__Ű_ŒŰ_ŒŒŰ‹_Feast of Breaking the Fast.Ű_í_Ű__Ű_ŒŰ_ŒŰ_í_Ű_Œ

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Environmental Justice, Fall 2004
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
5.0 stars

Examines theories and practice of environmental justice, concerns about race, poverty, and the environment in both domestic and international contexts, exploring and critically analyzing philosophies, frameworks, and strategies underlying environmental justice movements. Examines case studies of environmental injustices, including: distribution of environmental quality and health, unequal enforcement of regulations, unequal access to resources to respond to environmental problems, and the broader political economy of decision-making around environmental issues. Explores how environmental justice movements relate to broader sustainable development goals and strategies. This class explores the foundations of the environmental justice movement, current and emerging issues, and the application of environmental justice analysis to environmental policy and planning. It examines claims made by diverse groups along with the policy and civil society responses that address perceived inequity and injustice. While focused mainly on the United States, international issues and perspectives are also considered.

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Carmin, JoAnn
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Environmental Policy and Economics
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottomâ€ in environmental regulation? What is "sustainable developmentâ€? How do environmental problems differ in developing countries? Are we running out of oil and other natural resources? Should we be more energy efficient? To gain real world experience, the course is scheduled to include a visit to the MIT cogeneration plant. We will also do an in-class simulation of an air pollution emissions market.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
07/14/2022
Evolution as Reproduction with Variability
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

In this online activity, learners discover how random variation influences biological evolution. Biological evolution is often thought of as a process by which adaptation is generated through selection.Œć While it is recognized that random variation underlies the process, emphasis is usually placed on selection and resulting adaptation, leaving a sense that it is selection that drives evolution.Œć This simulation highlights the creative role of random variation, offering a somewhat different perspective: that of evolution as open-ended exploration driven by randomness and constrained by selection, with adaptation as a dynamic, transient consequence rather than an objective.

Subject:
Life Science
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Simulation
Provider:
Serendip Studio
Provider Set:
Minds-On Activities for Teaching Biology
Date Added:
11/09/2012
Evolving Ideas: Did Humans Evolve?
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This video from Evolution explores the evolution of humans from a common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees, and other apes.

Subject:
Life Science
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
Clear Blue Sky Productions
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
09/26/2003
Evolving Ideas: Why Does Evolution Matter Now?
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In this video from Evolution, an exploration of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in the Russian prison system highlights one reason it is important to understand evolution.

Subject:
Life Science
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
Clear Blue Sky Productions
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
09/26/2003
Explorations: An Open Invitation To Biological Anthropology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Anthropology is the study of humanity, in all its biological and cultural aspects, past and present. It is a four-field discipline comprised of biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, archaeology, and linguistic anthropology. The focus of this book is biological anthropology, which explores who we are from biological, evolutionary, and adaptive perspectives.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
American Anthropological Association
Author:
Beth Shook
Katie Nelson
Kelsie Aguilera
Date Added:
01/14/2020
Exploring Religious America
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, learn about Muslims in Lawrenceville, Georgia, their plans to build an Islamic cemetery and the stiff objections from their Christian neighbors.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Finding Lucy
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This Evolution video segment depicts the landmark hominid fossil finds by Don Johanson and his team in Ethiopia.

Subject:
Life Science
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
Clear Blue Sky Productions
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
09/26/2003
Fossil Evidence of Bipedalism
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This video segment adapted from NOVA shows how scientists use the fossil record to trace when early human ancestors and related species began walking on two legs instead of four, and to determine whether they were more apelike or human in appearance.

Subject:
Life Science
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media Common Core Collection
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
03/10/2010
Garbage Archaeology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Students will look at the garbage we create as a culture in a deeper and more connected way and theorizing about the culture that creates and uses it. Designed for use in an online course, it could certainly be adapted for use in grounded courses as well.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Biology
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Gem Baldwin, Edmonds Community College
Date Added:
12/09/2021
Gender stereotypes in archaeology
Rating
0.0 stars

This booklet is a short but informative and critical response by archaeologists to various gender stereotypes that exist in the archaeological explanation of the past, as well as in the contemporary disciplinary practice.

The booklet includes 24 commonly encountered gender stereotypes in archaeology, explained and deconstructed in 250 words by archaeologists with expertise on gender in the past and in contemporary archaeology, most of them being members of the Archaeology and Gender in Europe (AGE) Community of the European Association of Archaeologists. In addition, the stereotypes are beautifully illustrated by Serbian award-winning artist Nikola Radosavljević.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Bisserka Gaydarska
Laura Coltofean-Arizancu
Uroš Matić
Date Added:
03/23/2022
Hajj - Part I
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, meet an American Muslim as he prepares for Hajj, the pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca that commemorates the Abrahamic roots of Islam.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Hajj - Part II
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Performed with over two million other Muslims, the rites of Hajj, the required pilgrimage to Mecca, have a profound personal impact on each pilgrim. In this video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, a Muslim from America experiences Hajj for the first time.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Hajj - Part III
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students learn about an American Muslim's impressions of his first pilgrimage to Mecca in this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Halal - Kosher Dining at Dartmouth
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

A dining hall at Dartmouth College accommodates the religious dietary requirements of Muslims, Jews and Hindus as explained in this video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Homo Sapiens Versus Neanderthals
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This video segment, adapted from NOVA, explores reasons why Homo sapiens had an advantage over Neanderthals in the pursuit of territory and natural resources.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
04/19/2007
Human Chromosome 2
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In this video segment adapted from NOVA: Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial, learn how modern genetics and molecular biology offer compelling support for evolution. The video features an interview with biologist Ken Miller.

Subject:
Life Science
Genetics
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
Vulcan Productions, Inc.
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
11/01/2007
Interdisciplinary Problem-Solving Project for the Science Classroom
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Students are assigned unique roles and work independently to solve a complex problem from the perspective of their role (i.e. sociologist, educator, historian, etc.) Students then work collaboratively to present their findings and action plan to the "tribal council".

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Agriculture
Environmental Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Biology
Oceanography
Anthropology
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Liliana Caughman
Date Added:
11/19/2021
International Migration
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
3.0 stars

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and fears. At the political level, this has far-reaching consequences, ranging from electoral victories of populist right-wing parties to the increasing isolation policy of Europe and the United States. But what exactly is migration? What are its causes? And what are problems and opportunities?

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
edeos - digital education
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Barkemeyer
Künzl
Date Added:
10/11/2012
Introduction to Anthropology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Designed to meet the scope and sequence of your course, OpenStax Introduction to Anthropology is a four-field text integrating diverse voices, engaging field activities, and meaningful themes like Indigenous experiences and social inequality to engage students and enrich learning. The text showcases the historical context of the discipline, with a strong focus on anthropology as a living and evolving field. There is significant discussion of recent efforts to make the field more diverse—in its practitioners, in the questions it asks, and in the applications of anthropological research to address contemporary challenges. In addressing social inequality, the text drives readers to consider the rise and impact of social inequalities based on forms of identity and difference (such as gender, ethnicity, race, and class) as well as oppression and discrimination. The contributors to and dangers of socioeconomic inequality are fully addressed, and the role of inequality in social dysfunction, disruption, and change is noted.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
David G. Lewis
Jennifer Hasty
Marjorie M. Snipes
Date Added:
02/23/2022
Introduction to Biological Anthropology OER Text and Reading List
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Introduction to Biological Anthropology OER Text and Reading List

ATH 101. Introduction to Biological Anthropology.

Introduces biological anthropology and the study of evolution in the context of modern genetics and primate behavior studies. Examines human fossil record, diversity, and commonality of present and past populations of humankind.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Mary Courtis
Date Added:
03/05/2021
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Course Calendar
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology course calendar using the open textbook Perspectives: http://sacc.americananthro.org/publication/open-source-textbook/

Course Description
Considers contemporary human cultures from an anthropological perspective. Covers fieldwork, language, race, gender, sex and marriage, kinship, politics, world view, religion, economics, and globalization from a cross-cultural perspective. This course compares cultures found around the globe, focusing closely upon at least two specific cultures, with extended discussion of additional cultures and societies as appropriate. Greater understanding of particular cultures will be achieved through an application of the comparative method.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

Describe basic concepts, methods, and theories associated with cultural anthropology.
Use an understanding of anthropology to identify and compare values, beliefs, norms, economic systems, and social organization or institutions in a variety of societies in different world regions.
Examine systems of power and social justice issues related to U.S. society and other cultures from an anthropological perspective.
Explore fieldwork methods and ethical considerations of doing anthropological fieldwork.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Rebecka Daye
Date Added:
03/10/2020
An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology: Perspectives on Humanity Reading List and Schedule
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology: Perspectives on Humanity Reading List and Schedule

ANTH 213

Introduces a comparative study of human culture. Covers kinship systems, politics, economics, language, ritual, cultural change, ecological adaptations, and ethnographic methodology. Explores cultural similarities and differences and the linkages among cultural, social, political, and economic institutions.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Reading
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Jessica Piekielek
Date Added:
03/08/2021
Introduction to Paleoanthropology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Introduction to Paleoanthropology covers the various species and subspecies that gave rise to human beings. Paleoanthropology is a subdiscipline of physical anthropology that focuses on the fossil record of humans and non-human primates.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
05/13/2016
Islamic Celebrations
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
2.0 stars

Members of the Islamic Center of Washington, DC discuss the religious and spiritual significance of Ramadan and the celebration that concludes it, Eid al-Fitr, in this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Jesup Revisited: Exploring the North Pacific Expedition Anew
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

This Web site celebrates the centenary anniversary of the Jesup North Pacific Expedition and reports on the museum's project to return photographs to the communities visited and documented during the 1897 expedition. It includes:background information about the original expedition and its goals, a brief overview of the 2002 project, including a map of the cities and villages visited and black-and-white photographs from each of the eight small exhibits.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Data Set
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
10/15/2014
Justice, Power, and Activism: What the Goldman Environmental Prize Winners Teach Us About Resilience and Democracy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This activity is a set of student-centered exercises that enable students to learn about the individual stories of Goldman environmental prize winners, the activism and organizing that grounds their work, and the underlying political and social contexts from which their struggles emerge. The lesson inspires critical reflection about justice, power, and democracy in green politics, and encourages ways to make personal connections to activism and environmental work.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Environmental Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Agriculture
Environmental Studies
History
Biology
Oceanography
Anthropology
Economics
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Jason Lambacher
Date Added:
09/01/2022
LANGUAGE, THOUGHT, and REALITY (1956 edition)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

A unique perspective on the confluence of the three basic conceptual frameworks in human experience. Contains several studies, with data, of remarkable world views of disparate cultures based on their specific cultures language. The premise is that how people experience the world, then think about it, then create a language around it, alters their perception of the world in very fundamental ways. The radical notion is that thought and language, creates the circumstances of, and contribute to significantly different realities for different peoples.

The internalization and realization of this concept is significant and can possibly radically alter and change how different cultures assess their ability to, at the most basic levels, understand other cultures realities.

Subject:
World Cultures
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Social Science
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
Social Work
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson
Primary Source
Reading
Textbook
Author:
Benjamin Lee Whorf
Openlibrary Org
Date Added:
09/06/2018
Laetoli Footprints
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This Evolution video segment describes how the famous track fossils known as the Laetoli footprints might have been formed and what they can reveal about the creatures who left them.

Subject:
Life Science
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
Clear Blue Sky Productions
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
09/26/2003
Looking at Our Own Cultural Artifacts
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Students learn about the subjective value of objects in this Moveable Museum lesson plan by "interpreting" each other's important cultural artifacts. The 11-page PDF guide has educator materials with background information, teacher strategies, assessment guidelines, and detailed notes about the curriculum standards addressed.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
10/15/2014
Macro-Microarray
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this activity, learners explore the "nuts and bolts" of gene chips. Learners construct a simple model of a DNA microarray (also known as gene chips) and learn how microarrays can be used to identify and treat disease--including cancer. This resource includes references and an explanation of microarrays.

Subject:
Genetics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Julie Yu
National Science Foundation
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
11/07/2007
Madrasahs
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly gives a primer on the history and evolution of madrasahs, institutes of higher learning in Islamic studies.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008
Marginalized Voices: Open for Antiracism (OFAR)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

This assignment is designed as a mini-research project with the purpose of having students engage with marginalized actors in history. The purpose is to help students find themselves in the archives by focusing on self-representation that is important to their own socio-economic and ethnic groups. By providing historical research in the form of primary and secondary documents on figures that have been historically "left out" of the historical narrative, the students will help fill the gaps in the archive, be active in the creation of new curriculum, and gain a better understanding of marginalization and the power of historical memory in the process.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Religious Studies
Criminal Justice
History
Ancient History
U.S. History
World History
Anthropology
Sociology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Jeff Newby
Open for Antiracism Program (OFAR)
Date Added:
06/10/2022
Mass Drug Administration -  Anthropological Perspectives of Relevance to Mass Drug Administration (12:51)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

This presentation talks about anthropological perspectives of relevance to mass drug administration. Anthropology is a social science discipline focused on studying culture, including norms, values, perceptions and practices and how people enact these in their daily lives.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Nordic QM,University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
Mass Drug Administration
Author:
Anthropologist Britt Tersbøl
Date Added:
01/07/2016
Materials in Human Experience
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; powerful metals in the Inka empire; rubber processing in ancient Mexico. Explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. Subject complements 3.091. Enrollment may be limited.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Heather Lechtman
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Muslim Prayer
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, learn about the daily prayer rituals of the Muslim faith and their significance in the life of a Muslim living in America.

Subject:
Religious Studies
World History
Anthropology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
06/16/2008