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A Bear of a Poem: Composing and Performing Found Poetry
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Some Rights Reserved
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4.0 stars

Children find favorite words, phrases, and sentences from familiar stories. Working together, they combine their words and phrases to create a poem. The poem is then shared as performance poetry.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/25/2013
Brass Techniques and Pedagogy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

Textbook for undergraduate brass methods course focusing on brass instrument techniques and pedagogy.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
PALNI Press
Author:
Brian Weidner
Date Added:
05/27/2021
Conversations with History: Comparing Rich Democracies, with Harold L. Wilensky
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Conversations with History and host Harry Kreisler welcome Harold Wilensky, Professor Emeritus of Political Science at UC Berkeley, to talk about his recently published book, Rich Democracies: Political Economy, Public Policy, and Performance. In this landmark work, Wilensky compares rich democracies and explores what makes these modern societies distinct and what makes them alike. (55 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
03/11/2007
Design, Build and Test Your Own Landfill
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Educational Use
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0.0 stars

Students design and build model landfills using materials similar to those used by engineers for full-scale landfills. Their completed small-size landfills are "rained" on and subjected to other erosion processes. The goal is to create landfills that hold the most garbage, minimize the cost to build and keep trash and contaminated water inside the landfill to prevent it from causing environmental damage. Teams create designs within given budgets, test the landfills' performance, and graph and compare designs for capacity, cost and performance.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Jean Parks
Date Added:
09/18/2014
English Language Arts, Grade 11
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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0.0 stars

The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers
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0.0 stars

In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision of the American Dream as put together by our Founding Fathers. They will be asked: How, if at all, has this dream changed? Is this dream your dream? First students will participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing for his or her vision of the American Dream, and then they will write an argument laying out and defending their personal view of what the American Dream should be.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate closely one of the documents that they feel expresses the American Dream.
Students participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing his or her vision of the American Dream.
Students write a paper, taking into consideration the different points of view in the documents read, answering the question “What is the American Dream now?”
Students write their own argument describing and defending their vision of what the American Dream should be.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What has been the historical vision of the American Dream?
What should the American Dream be? (What should we as individuals and as a nation aspire to?)
How would women, former slaves, and other disenfranchised groups living during the time these documents were written respond to them?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Much Ado About Nothing
Rating
0.0 stars

This unit uses William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing as a vehicle to help students consider how a person is powerless in the face of rumor and how reputations can alter lives, both for good and for ill. They will consider comedy and what makes us laugh. They will see how the standards of beauty and societal views toward women have changed since the Elizabethan Age and reflect on reasons for those changes. As students consider the play, they will write on the passages that inspire and plague them and on topics relating to one of the themes in the play. Finally, they will bring Shakespeare’s words to life in individual performances and in group scene presentations.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing .
Students read two Shakespearean sonnets and excerpts from an Elizabethan morality handbook dealing with types of women, and they respond to them from several different perspectives.
For each work of literature, students do some writing. They learn to write a sonnet; create a Prompt Book; complete a Dialectical Journal; and write an analytical essay about a topic relating to a theme in the play.
Students see Shakespeare’s play as it was intended to be seen: in a performance. They memorize 15 or more lines from the play and perform them for the class. Students take part in a short scene as either a director or an actor.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What are society’s expectations with regard to gender roles?
Does humor transcend time? Do we share the same sense of humor as our ancestors?
How do we judge people?
How important is reputation?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT (Cold Read)

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

CLASSROOM FILMS

The Branagh version of Much Ado About Nothing is available on DVD through Netflix and for streaming through Amazon. Other versions are also available on both sites.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Much Ado About Nothing, How Do We Judge People?, Character Analysis
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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0.0 stars

In this lesson, students will revise the final couplet of their sonnet, learn more about the characters in Much Ado About Nothing, and begin their Dialectical Journal. Finally, they will use their developing understanding of iambic pentameter to analyze Shakespeare’s language choices.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Much Ado About Nothing, How Do We Judge People?, Character Chart
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will finish Much Ado About Nothing and see whether their predictions for how things end are correct. They will also complete their Character Chart and weigh in on what they think the topic and the theme of the play are.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare As Performed, Fourth Group Performance
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, the performances continue. The fourth group of students will perform their memorized passages from Much Ado About Nothing .

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare As Performed, Second Group Performance
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, the performances continue. The second group of students will perform their memorized passages from Much Ado About Nothing .

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Much Ado About Nothing, What Is Funny?, The Good and the Badde
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will look at five passages from a morality handbook called The Good and the Badde . This book was written during the Elizabethan Era, and it tells us a lot about what people considered proper and improper behavior in English society. The sections they read will help them appreciate both Shakespeare’s sonnets andMuch Ado About Nothing .

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution
Rating
0.0 stars

People often say that mankind should learn from history. Charles Dickens, whose books are considered classics, set his novel A Tale of Two Cities in the past. He wanted his readers to learn from the bloody French Revolution and from the widespread brutality in London. Both cities (Paris and London) offer the reader a glimpse into dark and dangerous times. As students read about Dickens's Victorian setting and learn his view of the French Revolution, they will think about what makes a just world. Students will have a chance to think about their own experiences, and, using techniques they have learned from Charles Dickens, they will do some writing that sends a message about your own world.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

To complete the unit accomplishments, students will:

Read the Charles Dickens novel A Tale of Two Cities.
Read several short pieces, including a biography of Dickens and excerpts from other literature, to help them understand Dickens’s world and the world of the novel.
Explore new vocabulary to build their ability to write and speak using academic language.
Practice close reading and participate in several role plays and dramatic readings to help them experience the dramatic writing style of Charles Dickens.
Write a vignette and a short narrative piece, and practice using descriptive detail and precise language.
Write a reflection about the meaning of Dickens’s novel.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How does good storytelling affect the reader, and how can a good story promote change in the world?
What was the Victorian view of gender roles?
How can power be abused?
What is loyalty ? What are the limits of loyalty?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution, Dickens as Storyteller, Messages Through Images
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CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, you will talk about the ways in which images send social and political messages to the reader.In this lesson, students will talk about the ways in which images send social and political messages to the reader.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
In the Jungle
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This resource was created by Staci Simonsen, in collaboration with Lynn Bowder, as part of ESU2's Mastering the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education and experiential learning.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Arts ESU2
Date Added:
11/01/2021
A Little Theater Lesson
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
5.0 stars

This lesson encourages students to understand how to properly portray a story to an audience, helping with student’s public speaking abilities. Allowing students to be in groups with this performance helps get them comfortable with public speaking. Furthermore this lesson covers the following standards: 4.RL.2.3, 4.RL.2.2, 4.SL.4.2.

Subject:
Performing Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
kaili witzig
Date Added:
09/16/2019
Remix
Making a
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The purpose of this course is for adult learners to improve their communication skills, particularly writing, by arguing effectively for a raise. Their arguments will consist of evidence-based claims. Additionally, the lesson provides general guidelines on how to respond to the rejection of a raise and criticism of one's work. The target audience of this lesson is adults at the 7th grade reading and writing level. This lesson is intended for a real classroom. This module involves reading, writing and speaking components. The entire lesson will take roughly 45 minutes to complete.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Caroline K
Date Added:
08/08/2019
Making an Evidence-Based Argument for a Raise in the Workplace
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The purpose of this course is for adult learners to improve their communication skills, particularly writing, by arguing effectively for a raise. Their arguments will consist of evidence-based claims. The target audience of this lesson is adults at the 7th grade reading and writing level. This lesson is intended for a real classroom. This module involves reading, writing and speaking components. The entire lesson will take roughly 30 minutes to complete.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Christina McNish
Date Added:
10/04/2018
Measurement and Performance
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This unit describes the concepts of quality measurement and performance improvement. The unit begins by setting the context of known quality problems in healthcare and then describes how quality is measured and efforts to improve it. The unit also discusses the role of information technology, incentives for quality improvement, and quality measurement under meaningful use.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Open Michigan
Provider Set:
Health IT Workforce Curriculum
Author:
Oregon Health & Science University
Date Added:
09/26/2014
The New Nordic Diet - From Gastronomy to Health - The Influence on Children's Cognition and Performance in School (04:59)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Besides measuring the health effects of school meals based on the New Nordic Diet, the OPUS Study also evaluated the effect of the intervention on cognitive performance of the children. In continuation of this, we will explain why it is relevant to measure cognitive performance and provide a short summary of the methods we used and the findings.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Nutrition
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
The New Nordic Diet - From Gastronomy to Health
Author:
Professor Kim Michaelsen
Date Added:
01/07/2016
Organizational Behavior
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

This OpenStax resource aligns to introductory courses in Organizational Behavior. The text presents the theory, concepts, and applications with particular emphasis on the impact that individuals and groups can have on organizational performance and culture. An array of recurring features engages students in entrepreneurial thinking, managing change, using tools/technology, and responsible management; furthermore, the unique chapter on Social Media and Communication contextualizes the importance and implications of various platforms and communications methods.

Subject:
Management
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
David S. Bright
Donald G. Gardner
Eva Hartmann
James S. O’Rourke
Jason Lambert
Jon L. Pierce
Joseph Weiss
Joy Leopold
J. Stewart Black
Laura M. Leduc
Richard M. Steers
Siri Terjesen
Date Added:
06/05/2019
Poetry Open Mic
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Lila Gray instills her own love of poetry in her students by encouraging them to write original works and finding poems that express who they are. Her weekly open mic sessions create a perfect venue for building confidence and helping students find their voice while still hitting core standards and learning lifelong skills.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
11/01/2012
Remix
Presenti
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The purpose of this lesson is for adult learners to improve their communication skills, specifically speaking and listening, by constructing and presenting an evidence-based argument in favor of a raise.

Arguments consist of evidence-based claims that are relevant to their work scenario. The target audience is adults at the 8th grade reading and writing levels. This lesson suites face-to-face classrooms where educators need to be flexible, creative and resourceful. This lesson involves reading, writing, and speaking components. The entire lesson will take 60 minutes to complete.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Rema Merrick
Date Added:
08/08/2019
Speak Up! Creative and engaging ways to get students talking
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This robust set of videos, activity sheets, and short written summaries is designed for anyone to use when integrating speaking assignments and activities into college level courses. Each video highlights a specific student activity, applicable to any delivery mode, complete with a video introduction, template, and lesson plan to download. Open pedagogical opportunities are incorporated into several modules with emphasis on student led engagement. Created by Miranda Hawk at Madison Area Technical College.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Communication
Career and Technical Education
Education
Higher Education
Speaking and Listening
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Rachel Becker
Date Added:
11/30/2021
Using Publicly Available Data to Engage IV-E Students in Research and Statistics: Instructional Modules.
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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0.0 stars

Increasingly, public agencies are adopting models of self-assessment in which administrative data are used to guide and then continuously evaluate the implementation of programs and policies. In California, public child welfare agencies track performance outcomes spanning a range of child safety, permanency, and well-being domains, as dictated by federal and state mandates. This curriculum has been designed to provide Title IV-E and others students interested in public child welfare systems with an overview of the state’s Child Welfare Outcomes and Accountability System. Students will be provided with hands-on opportunities to become experienced and “statistically literate” users of aggregate, public child welfare data from the state’s administrative child welfare system, attending to the often missing link between data/research and practice. This curriculum is organized into five teaching modules, providing instructors with student learning activities, PowerPoint slide presentations, and other materials to support graduate IV-E students in the development of practical data analysis skills. Materials focus on publicly available data hosted through the Child Welfare Indicators Project at the University of California at Berkeley, a long-standing agency/university data partnership: http://cssr.berkeley.edu/ucb_childwelfare. CalSWEC funding for the development of this curriculum was provided to the Child Welfare Performance Indicators Project. Modules were developed to support instructors of both first- and second-year MSW research courses. Module objectives include: (a) to support student (and instructor) understanding of California's child welfare system performance goals and progress to date; (b) to develop students who have highly desirable (and practical) data analysis skills, including the ability to intelligibly distill and present numerical findings; and (c) to prepare a cohort of IV-E MSW students equipped to adopt leadership roles in county child welfare agencies, bringing with them an appreciation for how data can be used to improve practice and inform policies. Putnam-Hornstein, E., Needell, B., Lery, B., King, B., & Weigmann, W. (2013).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
02/26/2018