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Activity: #Tweeting the Air War Against the Nazis by Katherine Lorio
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This is a technology-dependent lesson that students can guide at their own pace of exploration and learning. Students share what they learn through the use of Twitter (or alternative classroom sharing medium like TodaysMeet). The use of a social sharing platform like Twitter gives students a place for sharing with a wider audience, for more effective means of communication with each other, for incorporating viewpoints from all students in the classroom, and a means to reference thinking and learning by the use of a hashtag at a later time. Students will understand the role the Allied Air Forces played in the Normandy Invasion. Teachers can use this as a stand-alone lesson or offer more structure by guiding students through each source, one by one. Teachers may learn more about the Eighth Air Force by accessing the ABMC’s Strategic Bombing Campaign Interactive.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Gary Pettit
Date Added:
12/17/2018
American Beginnings, The European Presence in North America 1492 - 1600: Primary Sources
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
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The National Humanities center presents reading guides with primary source materials for the study of the European presence in North America from 1492-1600. Primary source materials include letters, diaries, journals, poems, paintings, maps, wills, captivity narratives, and more. Resources are further divided into the topics: Contact, Exploration, Settlement, Permanence, and Power.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
America In Class
Date Added:
01/07/2013
American History
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CC BY-NC
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Concept: Cherokee Nation History- The Trail of Tears

Objectives: The juniors in American History should be able to describe, in a timeline diagram, the events leading up to the Trail of Tears, and must score a 75 percent or higher.

Introduction: I will show a video displaying the Trail of Tears. The video will introduce the upcoming new information of the Cherokee, since the class learned about the actions the Cherokee took during the Civil War.

Vocabulary: Cherokee Nation, Andrew Jackson, Trail of Tears, civilized tribe(s), death marches, Indian Removal policy, and Chief John Ross

Body of Lesson: Show the video of the Trail of Tears. Then move onto a small lecture. After the lecture is over allow the students to pair share with a partner. This allows time for them to get notes they might have missed. The bring the class back together for a group discuss to talk about if the actions by the Cherokee and United States government can be justified or not. Next I would go onto the interest to access a website that has firsthand experience the Cherokee went through on the Trail of Tears. Lastly, I would give out an assignment for the students to complete that goes over the information learned to take home for homework.

Accommodations/Modifications: For ELL and ESL students I would use some sort of translation site such as Google Translate. I would also walk around the classroom trying to answer any questions the special students might have, or not understand. Emphasize the information students need to understand to ensure the homework would be done correctly. If students are deaf go slow enough to ensure the translator is keeping up, and try to sign some words myself. If student is blind try to be very descriptive. Try to create a classroom that is still challenging to the gifted students, this can be done by having more difficult questions for them to complete, but still able to work easily with one another so no one is bored. Try to have classroom that accommodate any students need.

Multiple Intelligence(s) Addressed: I would like to have a classroom with almost every learning style used, have it range from hands on to visual aids. Anything could really be used, and be beneficial as long as it relates to the Cherokee Nation.

Assessment: Have the student write out a timeline of events leading up to the Trail of Tears, which they will have to score a 75 percent or higher on.

Materials: Textbook (depending what book the school has), use The West: An Illustrated History; By: Geoffrey C. Ward; 9780316735896; Little, Brown and Company, http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/nchist-newnation/4532 for personal experience from soldiers point of view, http://www.bringinghistoryhome.org/assets/bringinghistoryhome/(3)%20indianremoval.pdf has experiences and activity plus talks about the five civilized tribes.

Standards: SS 12.4.2 (US) Students will analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon US history using multiple types of sources. SS 12.4.5 (US) Students will develop historical research skills.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Kristyn Stricker
Date Added:
12/17/2018
The American Revolution
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The American Revolution entailed some remarkable transformations -- converting British colonists into American revolutionaries, and a cluster of colonies into a confederation of states with a common cause -- but it was far more complex and enduring then the fighting of a war. As John Adams put it, "The Revolution was in the Minds of the people . . . before a drop of blood was drawn at Lexington" -- and it continued long past America's victory at Yorktown. This course will examine the Revolution from this broad perspective, tracing the participants' shifting sense of themselves as British subjects, colonial settlers, revolutionaries, and Americans.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Joanne B. Freeman
Date Added:
06/16/2011
Bay College - HIST 211 - U.S. History to 1865
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CC BY
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Online OER text created for U.S. History to 1865 by Dr. June Klees for Bay College.

© 2017 Bay College and Content Creators. Except where otherwise noted this work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bay College
Author:
Dr. June Klees
Date Added:
03/30/2017
Bay College - HIST 212 - U.S. History 1865 to Present
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
3.4 stars

Online OER text created for U.S. History 1865 to Present by Dr. June Klees for Bay College.

© 2017 Bay College and Content Creators. Except where otherwise noted this work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bay College
Author:
Dr. June Klees
Date Added:
03/30/2017
Calisphere Themed Collection - 1780-1880: California in Transition:  Californio Society, 1830s-1880s
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This is a primary source photo collection on Californios, elite families that received large land grants from Spain and Mexico, flourished during the 1830s to 1880s. The hand-drawn diseño maps underscore their vital connection to land ownership. The more formal surveyed maps that followed US acquisition of California show changing values regarding land ownership. As Californios lost land and power in the late 19th century, they tried to adapt to these changes by using social networks to maintain their identities as elites. The formal portraits were one way to bolster this image. Photographs of the Ramona Pageant from the 1950s testify to the mythologizing of California's Mexican and Spanish pastoral heritage less than 100 years later.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
06/20/2011
The Civil War in Art:
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"The Civil War in Art: Teaching and Learning through Chicago Collections" is intended to help teachers and students learn about the Civil War—its causes and effects—and connect to the issues, events, and people of the era through works of art.

Web resource explores the Civil War through over 120 zoomable images from Chicago collections, with text and questions for students. The site presents essays about: The Civil War and American visual culture, the causes of the war, the military experience, emancipation and the meaning of freedom, the northern homefront, Lincoln, and remembering the war.

Other resources include classroom projects for teacher use, an in-depth glossary of art and historical terms, and links to additional Civil War resources.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
Terra Foundation for American Art
Date Added:
04/13/2012
Compromise of 1850
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CC BY
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In this resource, students are learning about the Compromise of 1850. This is a difficult concept for students to understand. They will read the compromise in the online textbook, ushistory.org. Then, a video of teacher explaining the reading, context, and helping lower level learners understand the content. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Textbook
Author:
Jennifer Klein
Date Added:
02/25/2020
Dolly Madison and the Rise of Nationalism: Analyzing Sources Lesson Plan
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 Lesson outcomesStudents can evaluate the credibility of a source and corroborate varying versions of a historical event.Analyze the actions of Dolley Madison during the burning of the Capitol.AssessmentWhen looking at the varying stories of Dolley Madison’s rescue of George Washington’s portrait, which source is the most reliable?  Explain your reasoning.State Standards, Indicator, ObjectiveEvaluate the credibility of the sources by considering the authority, the origin, type, context, and corroborative value of each sourceIdentify credible, relevant information contained in the sourcesIdentify evidence that draws information from multiple sources to support claims, noting evidentiary limitationsAnalyzing how the War of 1812 impacted American nationalismSource CitationsEllison, Jessica. “Out of Washington's Shadow: Teaching with the Voices of Enslaved Early Americans.” NCSS Conference 2016. NCSS Conference 2016, 2 Dec. 2016, Washington, DC, Walter E. Washington Convention Center

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jamie Barker
MSDE Admin
Date Added:
09/08/2018
English Language Arts, Grade 12
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CC BY-NC
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The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Project: Self-Portrait
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This project unit—a multimedia self-portrait published in digital form—is the capstone of your students' high school careers. It is a chance for them to pause and reflect on where they've been, where they're going, and who they are as a person. Students will reflect on what they want others to know about them: what they want their message to be and what types of media they might use to convey that message. Students will have the opportunity to express themselves in many different formats—through writing, of course, but also through other media of their choosing. Students will be able to convey your message through visual art, photography, a graphic novel, audio, poetry, or video—practically any type of media they want!

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students will complete a multimedia self-portrait, capturing important aspects of the essence of themselves.
Students will contribute one chapter from their multimedia self-portrait to a class anthology.
Students will present one chapter from their multimedia self-portrait to the class.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How is late adolescence a moment of internal and external change?
What are the most important qualities of your character—past, present, and future?
How can you portray these key aspects of yourself using multimedia?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Project: Self-Portrait, Publication and Celebration, Reviewing Common Themes
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The class will finish the presentations. What new things about the students did the presentations teach them? Were there common themes students noticed in all of the presentations? Did those themes help them draw conclusions about the experience of being a teenager?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
The Enslaved Family, African American Community during Slavery, African American Identity: Vol. I, 1500-1865, Primary Resources in U.S. History and Literature, Toolbox Library, National Humanities Cen
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"I never knew a whole family to live together, till all were grown up, in my life," recalls Lewis Clarke of his twenty-five years enslaved in Kentucky.1 Families were separated due to sale, escape, early death from poor health, suicide, and murder by a slaveholder, overseer, slave patroller, or other dominant person. Separation also occurred within the plantation itself, e.g., by segregating "field slaves" from "house servants," removing children from parents to live together with a slave caretaker, or bringing children fathered by the slaveholder to live in the "Big House." How, then, did the slave family provide solace and identity? "What the family does, and what the family did for African Americans," writes historian Deborah White Gray, "was create a world outside of the world of work. It allowed for significant others. It allowed a male slave to be more than just a brute beast. It allowed him to be a father, to be a son. It allowed women to be mothers and to take on roles that were outside of that of a slave, of a servant."2 When did the enslaved child realize how his or her family life differed from the slave-holder's? How did enslaved adults cope with the forced disintegration of their families? Here we read a collection of texts—two letters, a memoir, and interview excerpts—to consider these questions. (See also Theme II: ENSLAVEMENT, #2, Sale.)

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
National Humanities Center
Date Added:
05/03/2019
Explore the States
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1.0 stars

An interactive map of the United States with information, interactive activities, and links about all 50 states. The information provided varies from historical, geographical, biological, and cultural in nature.

Material Type:
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
America's Library
Date Added:
01/06/2015
Forgotten Rebellion: Black Seminoles and the Largest Slave Revolt in U.S. History
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The story of John Horse and the Black Seminoles has been largely untold, but according to Professor Amy Sturgis of Signum University, it deserves to be remembered. Not only did they create the largest haven in the U.S. South for runaway slaves and lead the largest slave revolt in U.S. history, but they also secured the only emancipation of rebellious slaves prior to the U.S. Civil War. In this video, Professor Sturgis tells the incredible story of the Black Seminoles.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Amy Sturgis
Date Added:
09/14/2017
Free Economics, Government, American History, and Personal Finance Courses
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CC BY-NC
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Are you looking for FREE, semester-long economics, government, american history, and personal finance courses? If so, visit www.certell.org to download. Certell is an educational non-profit who's mission is to support and develop educational resources and technology that lower the cost of education and help individuals lead flourishing lives. We want to help schools and teachers thrive! All content meets national standards and most meet AP standards (when applicable).

Subject:
Finance
U.S. History
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Ryan Keller
Date Added:
05/16/2017
History in the Making: A History of the People of the United States of America to 1877
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CC BY-SA
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This textbook examines U.S. History from before European Contact through Reconstruction, while focusing on the people and their history.

Prior to its publication, History in the Making underwent a rigorous double blind peer review, a process that involved over thirty scholars who reviewed the materially carefully, objectively, and candidly in order to ensure not only its scholarly integrity but also its high standard of quality.

This book provides a strong emphasis on critical thinking about US History by providing several key features in each chapter. Learning Objectives at the beginning of each chapter help students to understand what they will learn in each chapter. Before You Move On sections at the end of each main section are designed to encourage students to reflect on important concepts and test their knowledge as they read. In addition, each chapter includes Critical Thinking Exercises that ask the student to deeply explore chapter content, Key Terms, and a Chronology of events.

----------------
Authors: Tamara Spike, Sarah Mergel, Catherine Locks, Pamela Roseman

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Contributor: Marie Lasseter
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Inquiry Project
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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In this project, students will research different WWII leaders and make a brief 3-5 minute presentation about their specific leader. Once every group has presented, the entire class will hold a discussion/argument about why they believe their leader was the best WWII leader.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Cameron Simpson
Date Added:
12/17/2018
Introduction to The New Republic Source Analysis
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CC BY-NC
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Lesson outcomesStudents will examine the differences between the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans parties.Students will evaluate the credibility of a source and corroborating varying versions of a historical event.AssessmentAfter carefully examining three sources for reliability, students will determine who they trust more - Hamilton or Jefferson, citing relevant text information in their response.State Standards, Indicator, ObjectiveIdentifying the impact President George Washington had on setting precedents for the office of the President.Evaluating the evolution and impact of the Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties on domestic and foreign policy.Evaluate the credibility of the sources by considering the authority, the origin, type, context, and corroborative value of each sourceIdentify credible, relevant information contained in the sourcesIdentify evidence that draws information from multiple sources to support claims, noting evidentiary limitations

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jamie Barker
MSDE Admin
Date Added:
09/08/2018
Join America at Play
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Discover America's favorite pastimes, sports and hobbies, including baseball, vacationing, dancing, rodeo, and quilting. Play the "Batter Up" interactive history baseball game.

Material Type:
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
America's Library
Date Added:
01/06/2015
Jump Back in Time
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This website takes students through various eras in American History such as Colonial America, the Revolutionary Period, Western Expansion, The Civil War, The Gilded Age, The Great Depression, and Much More.

Material Type:
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
America's Library
Date Added:
01/06/2015
Mary McLeod Bethune by Emma Gelders Sterne, an ebook in epub and mobi formats
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CC BY-NC-ND
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5.0 stars

Grade Level is 7.6 using the Flesch-Kincaid readability test.

This is the challenging and inspired true story of a little girl who was determined to learn to read, and who went on to be a teacher, the founder of a college, an adviser to statesmen, and a great humanitarian. Mary McLeod Bethune was the fifteenth child of hardworking and god fearing parents. She was the first of their children to be born free. Her ancestry was wholly of African origin, a point of pride throughout her life.

Mrs. Bethune worked untiringly to restore—through education—her people's faith in the magnificent heritage that is rightfully theirs. During the many years of and tribulation, she refused to give up her fondest dream—her own school for Negro children. And, as a shining monument to her hard work and faith, she has given to black youth the thriving institution of Bethune- Cookman College in Daytona Beach, Florida.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Emma Gelders Sterne
Date Added:
06/21/2017
Meet Amazing Americans
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Discover the inventors, politicians, performers, activists and other everyday people who made this country what it is today. Includes brief biographies and interactive activities associated with historical figures such as W.E.B. DuBois, Amelia Earhart, Lewis & Clark, Mark Twain, George Washington, and many more.

Material Type:
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
America's Library
Date Added:
01/06/2015
Native American Delaware Indians
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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The Virtual Field Trip encompasses historical information relative to the Native American - Delaware Indians in which the students will access through technology. The Virtual Field Trip includes imagery and note-worthy information relative to the Conoy or Powhatan Indians, the Lenape Indians and the Nanticoke Indian tribe.The students will have an opportunity to interact with fellow peers and education professionals during allotted breaks in the Virtual Field Trip. The lessson incorporates YouTube videos depicting cultural practices of the three tribes of Indians chosen for discussion. The Virtual Field Trip may be utilized as a precursor for local Delaware Students to visit the Nanticoke Indian Museum in Millsboro, Delaware. The lesson is designed for student research in History, Geography, Civics, and Economics from a historical point of view and addressing current issues.

Subject:
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Cheryl DiBuo
Date Added:
03/03/2019
The Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature: A PSU-Based Project
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

In this class, we questioned the very parameters of what counts as American literature. Is American literature defined by geographical boundaries? Experiences? Histories? Themes? What is the difference between American literature and American history? Who determines what counts as American literature? How does the in-depth study of early American literature prompt us rethink representations of American culture today? In our global era, it is clear that past definitions of American literature must be revisited. This anthology moves to answer the question “what is American literature?” by framing the texts in new and provocative ways that fit the modern age.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Plymouth State University
Author:
Abby Goode
Date Added:
02/24/2020
The People vs. Columbus
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Educational Use
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0.0 stars

This role play begins with the premise that a monstrous crime was committed in the years after 1492, when perhaps as many as three million or more Taínos on the island of Hispaniola lost their lives. (Most scholars estimate the number of people on Hispaniola in 1492 at between one and three million; some estimates are lower and some much higher. By 1550, very few Taínos remained alive.)

Who — and/or what — was responsible for this slaughter? This is the question students confront here.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Teaching for Change and Rethinking Schools
Provider Set:
The Zinn Education Project
Date Added:
10/08/2012
See, Hear, and Sing
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Rating
0.0 stars

Watch a movie, hear a song, play a tune from America's past. Includes an interactive jukebox, an animation program, and historical information about popular entertainment throughout American history.

Material Type:
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
America's Library
Date Added:
01/06/2015
U.S. History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

 U.S. History is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of most introductory courses. The text provides a balanced approach to U.S. history, considering the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the United States from both the top down (politics, economics, diplomacy) and bottom up (eyewitness accounts, lived experience). U.S. History covers key forces that form the American experience, with particular attention to issues of race, class, and gender.Senior Contributing AuthorsP. Scott Corbett, Ventura CollegeVolker Janssen, California State University, FullertonJohn M. Lund, Keene State CollegeTodd Pfannestiel, Clarion UniversityPaul Vickery, Oral Roberts UniversitySylvie Waskiewicz

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
05/07/2014
US History: An Economic Perspective
Rating
0.0 stars

What is mercantilism? How did economics contribute to rising tensions between the North and the South in the years before the Civil War? What caused the Great Depression? In this video course designed specifically to help students study for the AP US History exam and SAT Subject Test, Professor Brian Domitrovich of Sam Houston State University explains key events in US economic history and surveys different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on each event.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Brian Domitrovich
Date Added:
09/14/2017
U.S. History II (HIST 147)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Welcome to History 147, the second in the introductory surveys of U.S. history. We begin in that decade when the United States in three years (1845-48) grew by 50 percent. Through the Civil War to the 20th century, we explore how different people experienced the transformation of the country into an industrial nation and emerging world power. Those who would like to pursue their study of American history will want to take Hist 146 (U.S. History I) and Hist 148 (U.S. History III).

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
U.S. History, Preface, Preface
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

U.S. History is designed for a two-semester American history sequence. It is traditional in coverage, following a roughly chronological outline, and using a balanced approach that includes political, economic, social, and cultural developments. At the same time, the book includes a number of innovative and interactive features designed to enhance student learning. Instructors can also customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Want a complete, semester long Economics, Government, or U.S. History course?
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CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Please visit www.certell.org for free complete, semester-long course packages. Available in common cartridge and pdf formats. Certell is a non-profit that creates and distributes multi-media rich social studies curriculum. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Ryan Keller
Date Added:
05/16/2017
What is the role of labor unions?
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CC BY-NC-SA
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It is my hope that this Driving Question will help introduce the topic of labor unions in American society. This discussion would connect well with historical concepts such as industrialization.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Interactive
Author:
Kaleb Wagers
Date Added:
10/09/2016
Why Do People Move?
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CC BY-NC
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0.0 stars

In this problem-based learning module, students will investigate the following question: Does the state of Ohio suffer from “Brain Drain?”If so why is this, where are people going, & what can be done to stop it?If not, what is keeping/bringing people here?After researching and learning about some of the push-pull factors that drove 19th century European immigration to the United States, student groups will be formed in order research, create, and share their findings to determine whether or not Ohio is a “push” or “pull” state.After the launch activity, students will spend the first two days gaining background knowledge on the historical components and content related to the topic.  Beginning on Day 4, students will be grouped into teams to begin research and development of the “BIG IDEA” question of: Does the state of Ohio suffer from “Brain Drain?”If so why is this, where are people going, & what can be done to stop it?If not, what is keeping/bringing people here?Once the groups have determined their position on the problem, they will begin researching information to be able to share out their findings.The final products will be presented to an authentic audience consisting of District Administration (i.e., media relations), Local Administration (elected officials), and possibly, local Chamber of Commerce members

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
11/22/2017
World History Encyclopedia
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CC BY-NC
Rating
4.0 stars

World History Encyclopedia is a non-profit organization publishing the world's most-read history encyclopedia. Its mission is to engage people with cultural heritage and to improve history education worldwide.

The website offers thousands of free history articles, with a writing style aimed at students from middle school level and up. Articles are complemented by videos, timelines, 3D models, and interactive maps. The search function offers many filters, including the possibiliy to search for primary source texts.

Additionally, the organization published free teaching materials in its education section (https://www.worldhistory.org/edu/).

Subject:
History
Ancient History
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
04/23/2013
Remix
World War II
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this unit students will connect past and present experiences of war by interviewing, researching, and analyzing different sources. They will also compare the ideologies that were the driving forces behind each major country involved in World War II. By the end of the unit, students will be able to discuss, defend, and draw conclusions about major events/controversies that happened during the war.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Melissa Pilakowski
Date Added:
08/08/2019