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  • Independence
10f. Thomas Paine's Common Sense
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Americans could not break their ties with Britain easily. Despite all the recent hardships, the majority of colonists since birth were reared to believe that England was to be loved and its monarch revered. Yet there were the terrible injustices the colonists could not forget. Americans were divided against themselves. Arguments for independence were growing. Thomas Paine would provide the extra push.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
10/16/2014
29a. The Lone Star Republic
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Most Texan-Americans wanted to be annexed by the United States. They feared that the Mexican government might soon try to recapture their land. Many had originally come from the American south and had great interest in becoming a southern state. President Andrew Jackson saw trouble. Many Whigs and Abolitionists in the North refused to admit another slave state to the Union. Rather than risk tearing the nation apart over this controversial issue, Jackson did not pursue annexation. The Lone Star flag flew proudly over the Lone Star Republic for nine years.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
55a. Early Involvement
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While Americans were girding to fight the Civil War in 1860, the French were beginning a century-long imperial involvement in Indochina. The lands now known as Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia comprised Indochina. The riches to be harvested in these lands proved economically enticing to the French.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
Arranging for independence
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Erin Espinoza's kindergarten classroom encourages children to learn on their own. A classroom profile.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Articles & More
Author:
Sydney Brown
Date Added:
08/17/1971
Flood Frequency Analysis
Conditions of Use:
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The Flood Frequency Analysis module offers an introduction to the use of flood frequency analysis for flood prediction and planning. Through use of rich illustrations, animations, and interactions, this module explains the basic concepts, underlying issues, and methods for analyzing flood data. Common concepts such as the 100-year flood and return periods as well as issues affecting the statistical representation of floods are discussed. Common flood data analysis methods as well as an overview of design events are also covered. As a foundation topic for the Basic Hydrologic Science course, this module may be taken on its own, but it will also be available as a supporting topic providing factual scientific information to support students in completion of the case-based forecasting modules.

Subject:
Hydrology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
COMET MetEd Collection
Author:
COMET
Date Added:
10/10/2006
Flood Frequency Analysis: International Edition
Conditions of Use:
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Flood frequency analysis uses historical flow records to both estimate the frequency with which floods of a certain magnitude may occur and predict the possible flood magnitude over a certain time period. This module offers a thorough introduction to appropriately constructing the necessary historical data series, calculating the flooding probabilities, and gauging the reliability of the resulting probability values. Methods for assessing flood frequency in basins with limited data are also discussed.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Hydrology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
COMET MetEd Collection
Author:
COMET
Date Added:
08/31/2010
Harry Truman and Independence, Missouri:
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features the home and story of our thirty-third President. Upon returning home after World War I, Truman married his childhood sweetheart, started a clothing store that failed, and was elected to a judgeship and later the U.S. Senate. He was Vice President 82 days when President Roosevelt died. As President, he used the atomic bomb to end World War II, instituted the Marshall Plan, and sent troops to defend South Korea when the North invaded.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
Teaching with Historic Places (TwHP)
Date Added:
01/29/2004
How to Stage a Revolution, Fall 2013
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Remix and Share
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This course explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ghachem, Malick
Ravel, Jeffrey
Wilder, Craig
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Independence Hall: International Symbol of Freedom
Conditions of Use:
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recounts the history of the building in Philadelphia where the Second Continental Congress signed the Declaration of Independence and where, a decade later, delegates to the Philadelphia Convention formulated the Constitution: the Pennsylvania State House. The Pennsylvania Assembly, which had been meeting in homes and taverns, moved into the building in September 1735. It was considered the most ambitious public building in the colonies.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
Teaching with Historic Places (TwHP)
Date Added:
08/14/2007
Introduction to The New Republic Source Analysis
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Lesson outcomesStudents will examine the differences between the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans parties.Students will evaluate the credibility of a source and corroborating varying versions of a historical event.AssessmentAfter carefully examining three sources for reliability, students will determine who they trust more - Hamilton or Jefferson, citing relevant text information in their response.State Standards, Indicator, ObjectiveIdentifying the impact President George Washington had on setting precedents for the office of the President.Evaluating the evolution and impact of the Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties on domestic and foreign policy.Evaluate the credibility of the sources by considering the authority, the origin, type, context, and corroborative value of each sourceIdentify credible, relevant information contained in the sourcesIdentify evidence that draws information from multiple sources to support claims, noting evidentiary limitations

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jamie Barker
Introduction to United States History: Colonial Period to the Civil War
Conditions of Use:
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This course will introduce the student to United States history from the colonial period to the Civil War. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in America during this 250-year period. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Analyze the first encounters between the Native inhabitants of North America with Spanish, French, and English colonizers and determine the effect of European colonization on Native Americans; Describe and assess the creation of English/British America; Interpret the main social, political, and economic development of colonies in British North America, including the emergence of a slave economy; Analyze how and why an independent United States was created in 1776 by interpreting the ideological, political, and economic roots of American independence as it developed through the Seven YearsĺÎĺĺÎĺ War, the Imperial Crisis and the American Revolution; Analyze the myriad political and economic crises that plagued the Early American Republic in the 1780s and 1790s and identify and describe the expansion of slavery, partisan politics, economic innovation, westward expansion, and the outbreak of the War of 1812; Interpret the main developments of the Age of Jackson, the Indian Removal Act, the Nullification Crisis, the rise of the Whig Party, the Bank War; Interrogate the definition of 'democracy' in 1820s and 1830s America; Analyze the era of reform in antebellum America and identify and describe the emergence of new religious groups- Shakers, Mormons, evangelicals - as well as moral reformers who sought to curb alcoholism, improve the prison system, increase women's rights, end slavery, or modify the American education system; Analyze antebellum America and the emergence of sectionalism, and identify and describe how Northerners and Southerners apparently opposing viewpoints about labor systems, political economy, and race often obscured many similarities; Analyze the impact of the ideology of Manifest Destiny on the development of the American West as it affected Native Americans and white settlers; Identify and describe the West, the California Gold Rush, the Mexican War, and the contested boundary in the Pacific Northwest; Interpret how the question of slaveryĺÎĺĺÎĺs expansion affected American political parties, law, and created sectional conflict - both political and ideological - between 1820 and the 1850s; Analyze the American Civil War; identify and describe how and why the federal union that was created in 1776 collapsed in 1861; and assess the major facets of the war (including military engagements, the home fronts, Lincoln's presidency, and the question of slavery). (History 211)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Latin American Revolutionaries
Conditions of Use:
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This collection uses primary sources to explore leaders of Latin American revolutions. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Modern Africa
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of sub-Saharan Africa from the European 'scramble for Africa' in the late nineteenth century to the present day. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Africa during this period. Each unit will include representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes in modern African history, such as the effects of World War I and World War II, the rise of African nationalism, decolonization and wars for independence, the influence of the Cold War, the problems of development, and the causes and consequences of the civil wars that have plagued African countries in the latter twentieth century. By the end of the course, the student will understand the historical origins of the challenges independent African nations face today. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and describe the regions of Africa colonized by European powers; Understand the causes of European imperialism and its short and long-term effects on African societies; Describe key African response to colonial rule; Identify and describe the effects of the First and Second World Wars on Africa; Identify and describe the causes of decolonization in Africa; Identify and describe the major political, economic, and social challenges to African states and societies after independence. (History 252)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Modern Latin and South America
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of Latin and South America from the early 19th century, when many Latin and South American colonies declared their independence from European rule, to the present day. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout Latin and South America during this 200-year period, such as efforts by independent Latin and South American nations to create stable economies in the 19th century, political and economic conflicts between independent states and European imperial powers, the emergence of violent left-wing and right-wing political and social movements in the 20th century, and the developmental challenges that many Latin and South American nations face today. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 19th and 20th centuries using historical research methods; Think critically about the history of Latin and South America from the 19th century to the present; Analyze how the peoples of Latin and South America attempted to organize viable nation-states following independence from Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule; Assess how the United States used economic imperialism to control the economic and political development of the nations of Latin and South America; Identify the origins of the 1910 Mexican Revolution and assess the political, economic, and social impact of the revolution for the people of Mexico; Assess the role that Latin and South American nations played in the global economy in the 19th and 20th centuries; Analyze the role that cultural agents such as the Catholic Church played in the development of Latin and South American nations; Identify the role played by women, indigenous peoples, and Afro-Latinos in the social and political development of Latin and South America; Identify the political and economic factors that led to the emergence of political dictatorships in many Latin and South American nations in the early 20th century; Assess how Cold War struggles between capitalist and Communist ideologies influenced political life in the nations of Latin and South America and led to the rise of repressive, authoritarian regimes in the 1970s and 1980s; Identify important contemporary political, economic, and social trends in Latin and South America based on an analysis of the region's history; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 19th and 20th centuries using historical research methods. (History 222)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Our History: A History of the United States from Pre-Columbian to the Present
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

1 US History to 1877
1.1 Chapter 1: In the Beginning
1.2 Chapter 2: When Cultures Collide
1.3 Chapter 3: British Colonial North America
1.4 Chapter 4: Colonial Government and Economy
1.5 Chapter 5: Colonial Slavery
1.6 Chapter 6: A Brief Overview of Colonial Religion
1.7 Chapter 7: Cultures of Colonial America
1.8 Chapter 8: An Intellectual and Religious Flowering in Colonial North America
1.9 Chapter 9: Towards Independence, 1750-1776
1.10 Chapter 10: Creating These United States, 1776-1800
1.11 Chapter 11: The Agrarian Republic and the Symbolic End of the Revolution, 1800-1826
1.12 Chapter 12: The Age of the Common Man, 1826-1850
1.13 Chapter 13: 19th Century Reform Movements
1.14 Chapter 14: War Drums, 1845-1860
2 US history from 1877 to the Present

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax CNX
Author:
Jim Ross-Nazzal
Date Added:
07/12/2017
Road to Revolution: 1763-1776
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore the events that led up to the American Revolutionary War. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
James Walsh
Date Added:
10/20/2015
SOS: Helping Students Become Independent Learners
Rating

This Module describes how teachers can help students stay on task by learning to regulate their behavior. The four strategies discussed are self-monitoring, self-instruction, goal-setting, and self-reinforcement (est. completion time: 1.5 hours).

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/13/2018