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2013 Plug-In Conference and Exposition: What's Next for the Electric Highway?
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This resource contains speaker presentations from the 2013 Plug-In Conference and Exposition. This conference took place September 30, 2013 to October 3, 2013 at Liberty Station in San Diego, CA and had the theme What's Next for the Electric Highway? This event brought together automotive manufacturers, component suppliers, electric utilities, government agencies, academia, and the environmental community to collaborate on the next steps in plug-in electric vehicle technology, infrastructure, policies and regulations, and market development.

Subject:
Automotive Technology and Repair
Material Type:
Case Study
Data Set
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Center for Automotive Technology - Macomb
Provider Set:
Center for Advanced Automotive Technology
Author:
Electric Power Research Institute
Date Added:
09/30/2013
29b. 54 40 or Fight
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The southern boundary of the United States with Mexico was not the only western territory under dispute. The Oregon Territory spanned the modern states of Oregon, Idaho, and Washington, as well as the western coast of Canada up to the border of Russian Alaska. Both Great Britain and America claimed the territory. The Treaty of 1818 called for joint occupation of Oregon — a solution that was only temporary. Led by missionaries, American settlers began to outnumber British settlers by the late 1830s. But Britain was not Mexico. Its powerful navy was still the largest in the world. Twice before had Americans taken up arms against their former colonizers at great expense to each side. Prudence would suggest a negotiated settlement, but the spirit of manifest destiny dominated American thought. Yet another great showdown loomed.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
29e. Gold in California
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In January of 1848, a man named James Marshall innocently noticed a few shiny flecks in a California stream at Sutter's Mill. Word spread of gold and soon people from all over California flocked inland seeking instant fortune. By autumn, word had reached the east, and once again Americans earned their reputation as a migratory people. During the year that followed, over 80,000 "forty-niners" flocked to California to share in the glory. Some would actually strike it rich, but most would not.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
41a. The Mining Boom
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Bonanza! That was the exclamation when a large vein of valuable ore was discovered. Thousands of optimistic Americans and even a few foreigners dreamed of finding a bonanza and retiring at a very young age.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
Audio Slideshow: The World is No Long our Oyster
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Oyster-Acidifying oceans dramatically stunt the growth of already threatened shellfish. This audio slideshow and video features scientists from Bodega Marine Lab and research on shellfish in Tomales Bay, CA.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Chemistry
Oceanography
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Science Foundation
Our Changing Oceans and Estuaries
Author:
National Science Foundation
Date Added:
08/14/2012
The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe Undertakes Innovative Action to Reduce the Causes of Climate Change
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe—a federally recognized Native American tribe in California—was one of 16 communities selected as a 2015–2016 Climate Action Champion by the Obama Administration for exceptional work in response to climate change.

The Tribe began its strategic climate action planning in 2008 and has become a regional leader in greenhouse gas reductions and community resiliency measures. To date, the Tribe has reduced energy consumption from 2008 levels by 35 percent and has committed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent by 2018, utilizing a range of approaches—including aggressive energy efficiency upgrades, developing on-site renewable energy (biomass, solar, fuel cells, grid battery storage), and switching to green fuels (electricity and biodiesel).

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
11/03/2016
Boomtimes Again: Twentieth-Century Mining in the Mojave Desert
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore twentieth-century mining in the Mojave Desert. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
04/11/2016
By Hand: Gary Stevens
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

SPARK follows sculptor Gary Stevens through his creative process, from harvesting unusual pieces of wood from ancient redwood forests through the painstaking work that produces his uniquely beautiful wood vessels. This Educator Guide is about the history and tradition of wood carving.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
KQED Education
Provider Set:
KQED Education Network
Date Added:
07/14/2004
The CANS: Overview, Case Planning and Preparation for Certification
Rating

This resource provides access to the required materials from the Northern California Training Academy's Using the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths in the California Integrated Core Practice Model training. This one-day training gives participants an understanding of how California will use the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) as a strategy to meet the Integrated Core Practice Model (ICPM) vision for creating behavioral objectives with families and teams.

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Student Guide
Author:
Northern Academy
Date Added:
06/08/2020
California Child Welfare Core Practice Model (CPM) Workforce Development Tools
Rating

This resource features tools designed for child welfare leaders in California to use and adapt to meet the workforce development needs of their specific county or jurisdiction.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Northern Academy
Date Added:
05/16/2018
California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom Lesson Plans
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This database of lessons is provided to support agriculture education in California classrooms. Over the last century, children have become further removed from the land that feeds and clothes us. And yet, Agriculture is the very basis of civilization—the food we eat, the clothing we wear, the material of our homes and many of our traditions and values…all coming from agriculture and collectively setting the pace for a nation's standard of living. The California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom works with K–12 teachers, and students to enhance education using agricultural examples.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Agriculture
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom
Date Added:
02/16/2011
California Gold Rush
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

On January 24, 1848, carpenter James Marshall discovered gold at Sutter’s Mill, a sawmill on the American River in Coloma, California. This news quickly spread across the country and around the world, igniting the California Gold Rush. Between 1848 and 1855, 300,000 fortune-seekers came to California, transforming its population, landscape, and economy. The largest wave of migrants—about 90,000 people—arrived in 1849, earning them the nickname “forty-niners.”

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
03/05/2018
California Missions
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The California Missions Resource Center is a comprehensive and unique resource for historical information on the twenty-one California Missions. We strive to provide quality information for students, teachers and people interested in discovering the wonderful history of the early missions and the people who helped create and shape the California we know today.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
California Missions Resource Center
Date Added:
11/10/2015
Chinese Exclusion Act
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Starting with the Gold Rush, Chinese migrated to California and other regions of the United States in search of work. As several photographs show, many Chinese found work in the gold mines and on the railroads. They accepted $32.50 a month to work on the Union Pacific in Wyoming in 1870 for the same job that paid white workers $52 a month. This led to deep resentment by the whites, who felt the Chinese were competing unfairly for jobs. White labor unions blamed the Chinese for lower wages and lack of jobs, and anti-Chinese feelings grew. The cartoon "You Know How It Is Yourself" expresses this sentiment. Several political cartoons in this topic are graphic representations of racism and conflicts between whites and Chinese. "Won't They Remain Here in Spite of the New Constitution?" shows a demonized figure of political corruption protecting Chinese cheap labor, dirty politicians, capital, and financiers. "The Tables Turned" shows Denis Kearney (head of the Workingman's Party of California, a union that had criticized Chinese laborers) in jail, being taunted by Chinese men. In 1880, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed the Chinese Exclusion Treaty, which placed strict limitations on the number of Chinese allowed to enter the United States and the number allowed to become naturalized citizens. In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited immigration from China (The Act was not repealed until 1943). The two-part cartoon from the July-December 1882 issue of The Wasp reflects how some citizens saw the situation. After the Act was passed, anti-Chinese violence increased. One illustration depicts the Rock Springs Massacre of 1885, a Wyoming race riot in which 28 Chinese were killed by British and Swedish miners. The "Certificate of Residence" document illustrates that Chinese individuals were required to prove their residence in the United States prior to the passage of the Exclusion Act. The poster offering a reward for Wong Yuk, a Chinese man, makes it clear that the United States was actively deporting Chinese. Despite discrimination and prejudice, this first wave of immigrants established thriving communities. Photographs taken in San Francisco's Chinatown show prosperous businesses, such as the "Chinese Butcher and Grocery Shop." Wealthy merchants formed active business associations, represented by the image "Officers of the Chinese Six Companies." The Chinese celebrated their heritage by holding cultural festivals, as shown in the photograph from 1896. The photographs "Children of High Class," "Golden Gate Park," and "Chinese Passengers on Ferry" are evidence that some Chinese adopted Western-style clothing while others wore more traditional attire.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (CSEC) Resources
Rating

This resource provides access to publications, reports and videos related to Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (CSEC) in child welfare, with particular emphasis on the role of California's child welfare agencies in supporting safety and stability for children and families impacted by commercial sexual exploitation.

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Northern Academy
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Continuous Quality Improvement in Child Welfare Learning Collaborative 2015
Rating

This resource provides access to various materials used throughout the Northern California Training Academy's Child Welfare CQI Collaborative Conference, which was held in February, 2015. To learn more about the Academy and the the courses it offers, visit humanservices.ucdavis.edu/academy.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Education
Social Science
Material Type:
Data Set
Author:
Northern Academy
Date Added:
11/29/2018
Conversations with History: Democracy, Disarmament and Public Education with Alan Cranston
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Alan Cranston was a four term Senator from California and president and founder of the Global Security Institute and director of its nuclear weapons elimination initiative. This discussion on democracy, disarmament and public education with UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler was taped in April 2000. (53 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Berkeley
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
03/13/2005