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1-ESS1-1 Proficiency Scale
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This is a task neutral proficiency scale for 1-ESS1-1. Resources used to make this: NGSS.NSTA.org, Appendix E from the NextGenScience site and the actual performance expectations. This scale was created through collaboration with five elementary teachers.

Subject:
Physical Science
Astronomy
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Maggie Bly
Date Added:
04/26/2019
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2nd grade Planet research
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Teacher: Angie ApautyLesson Title/Topic: Planets of the UniverseGrade: 2Duration: 50 minutesLearning Objectives: At the conclusion of this activity, students will be able to identify, name, locate, and determine the order of the planets of our solar system. Number and Size of Groups: 5 groups of 3 studentsLearner Activity/Teacher Activity:Whole group discussion. The teacher will ask the students the question, "What do you remember about the planets of our solar system and can you list them all?". The teacher will allow students time to think and write down their answers on their mini white boards. Next, the teacher will use the main white board to write down all the planets the students can recall. Then the students will get into their groups and each group will work together to do research and create a presentation over the planets. The teacher will visit each group to offer any help the students may need. The students will work on their presentations on day two and on day three, each group will give their presentations to the class using the smart board.At the end of the lesson, each group will receive a card with a planet on it and tape on the back. One person from each group needs to come to the front and place their planet in the correct order in the solar system with the help of the class.  

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Olivia Dwyer
Date Added:
05/15/2019
The 4-Point Backyard Diurnal Parallax Method
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On field, students have to image a given asteroid on two consecutive nights, producing two sets of images obtained over 10-15 minutes, each set separated by about 4-5 hours. In class, students have to process the images in order to measure the observed diurnal parallax and then determine the corresponding asteroid distance.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Eduardo Manuel Alvarez
Date Added:
02/06/2018
5-ESS1-1 Proficiency Scale
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This is a task neutral proficiency scale for 5-ESS1-1. Resources used to make this: NGSS.NSTA.org, Appendix E from the NextGenScience site and the actual performance expectations. This scale was created through collaboration with five elementary teachers.

Subject:
Physical Science
Astronomy
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Maggie Bly
Date Added:
04/25/2019
6th Grade Summer Science : Astronomy
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Middle Grades Science astronomy. Astronomy. Geology III Weathering Erosion and Human Impact Introduction Key Terms Weathering and Natural Erosion Rocks to Soil Erosion from Water Erosion from Gravity and Wind Human Activity and Erosion

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/02/2018
7th Grade Life Science at the Observatory: Life Throughout the Universe
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This classroom activity will show students that there is a lot we don't know about science, for example life throughout the universe. It will hopefully encourage students to question what we know and don't know, and exploration and study of the unknown.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Brad Snyder
Date Added:
08/10/2012
ASTR 1020 - Lab 11: Your Birthday Sky with Stellarium
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Using the planetarium program Stellarium, you will display the evening sky just after sunset for the date and location of your birthplace.  You will determine the times of the sunrise, sunset, and moon rise on your birthday, note the phase of the moon, and observe planetary positions and visibility.   ---------------------------------------Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
01/28/2022
ASTR 1020 - Lab 12: Mapping the Milky Way
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In 1610, Galileo made the first telescopic survey of the Milky Way and discovered that it is composed of a multitude of individual stars. Today, we know that the Milky Way comprises our view inward of the huge cosmic pinwheel that we call the Milky Way Galaxy and that is our home. Moreover, our Galaxy is now recognized as just one galaxy among many billions of other galaxies in the cosmos.---------------------------------------Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
05/17/2022
ASTR 1020 - Lab 13: The Nature of Galaxies
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Growing up at a time when the Hubble Space Telescope orbits above our heads and giant telescopes are springing up on the great mountaintops of the world, you may be surprised to learn that we were not sure about the existence of other galaxies for a very long time. The very idea that other galaxies exist used to be controversial. Even into the 1920s, many astronomers thought the Milky Way encompassed all that exists in the universe. The evidence found in 1924 that meant our Galaxy is not alone was one of the great scientific discoveries of the twentieth century.---------------------------------------Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
05/17/2022
ASTR 1020 - Lab 1: Introduction to Stellarium Software
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Welcome to Astronomy 1020 Lab 1! The Introduction to Stellarium Software lab will cover the installation, navigation, and use of Stellarium, the software which will be used to complete ASTR 1020 lab work.Stellarium [Copyright © 2004-2011 Fabien Chereau et al.]

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
11/29/2021
ASTR 1020 - Lab 2: Kepler's Law with Stellarium
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This activity will focus on Kepler's Law which concerns planetary motion.---------------------------------------Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
01/28/2022
ASTR 1020 - Lab 3: Expansion of the Universe
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Edwin Hubble examined the spectra of many galaxies, looking for the red (longer wavelengths) or blue (shorter wavelengths) shifts in the spectra, indicating relative motion. To his surprise, not only did all of the galaxies appear to be moving, but all were moving away from us, no matter the direction of the galaxy. In addition, he found most galaxies exhibited a redshift, and the redshift was larger the further it was from our galaxy.Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
03/04/2022
ASTR 1020 - Lab 4: Solar Rotation and Sunspots
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Galileo, in 1612, demonstrated that the Sun rotates on its axis with a rotation period of approximately one month. Our star turns in a west-to-east direction, like the orbital motions of the planets. The Sun, however, is a gas and does not have to rotate rigidly, the way a solid body like Earth does. Modern observations show that the Sun’s rotation speed varies according to latitude; that is, it’s different as you go north or south of the Sun’s equator.  Between 1826 and 1850, Heinrich Schwabe, a German pharmacist and amateur astronomer kept daily records of the number of sunspots. What he was looking for was a planet inside the orbit of Mercury, which he hoped to find by observing its dark silhouette as it passed between the Sun and Earth. Unfortunately, he failed to find the hoped-for planet, but his diligence paid off with an even more important discovery: the sunspot cycle. He found that the number of sunspots varied systematically, in cycles about a decade long. In this laboratory, you will engage in tracking the Sun like Galileo and Schwabe during a six-day cycle and then do a simple calculation of the rotational period of our sun.---------------------------------------Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
01/28/2022
ASTR 1020 - Lab 5: Spectroscopic Parallaxes
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Given the spectral classification of a distant giant star, you will use the H-R diagram to estimate its absolute magnitude and luminosity. From the distance modulus formula, you will estimate its distance via spectroscopic parallax. From the spectral type, you will estimate its surface temperature and then use the luminosity formula to estimate the diameter of your giant star.---------------------------------------Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
05/13/2022
ASTR 1020 - Lab 7: Parallax and Stellar Properties
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This laboratory measures the parallax shift of the Delta Leonis and uses a Spectral Classification Table to calculate the radius of this star from its temperature.---------------------------------------Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
05/13/2022
ASTR 1020 - Lab 9:  Cepheids - Part B
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In Part B, we will use a Python computer coding script to obtain a spectral redshift of a galaxy (M100). From this redshift, we will use the Doppler formula to find a recession speed. From this speed, we will apply Hubble’s Law to obtain the Hubble Constant.---------------------------------------Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
05/13/2022
Above the Clouds: Telescopes on Mauna Kea
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Educational Use
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This video segment adapted from First Light explains why the highest peak in the Pacific, Mauna Kea, is an ideal site for astronomical observations. Featured are new telescope technologies that allow astronomers to explore the universe in more depth.

Subject:
Education
Astronomy
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
12/17/2005
Accidental Discoveries
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Educational Use
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This segment from Swift: Eyes through Time traces the history military officers and engineers discovering a strange phenomenon in the sky that astronomers now know are gamma-ray bursts.

Subject:
Astronomy
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
Teachers' Domain
Author:
NASA
PA Space Grant
WPSU
Date Added:
11/30/2007