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1a. The Purposes of Government
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Why do governments exist? One major reason is that they create rules. ...

Why do governments exist? One major reason is that they create rules. But what rules are necessary or desirable? That is open to question, and different types of governments have certainly created a wide variety of rules.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
1c. What Is a Democracy?
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Democracies are based on "rule of law." The ancient Greeks (particularly Aristotle) ...

Democracies are based on "rule of law." The ancient Greeks (particularly Aristotle) valued natural law, the notion that human societies should be governed by ethical principles found in nature.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
1d. Democratic Values — Liberty, Equality, Justice
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Liberty and equality. These words represent basic values of democratic political systems, ...

Liberty and equality. These words represent basic values of democratic political systems, including that of the United States. Rule by absolute monarchs and emperors has often brought peace and order, but at the cost of personal freedoms. Democratic values support the belief that an orderly society can exist in which freedom is preserved. But order and freedom must be balanced.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
The 2000-Meter Row: A Case Study in Performance Anxiety
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This case study is based on another case in our collection, The ...

This case study is based on another case in our collection, The 2000-Meter Row: A Case in Homeostasis, which emphasizes the metabolic, respiratory, and cardiac responses of a young athlete competing in a championship rowing event. In this modified version, the same event is viewed in a new light to explore the psychological ramifications of the stressful sports competition. The case was developed for a mixed undergraduate-graduate course in sport psychology.

Subject:
Life Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
Provider Set:
Case Study Collection
Author:
Doug M. Post
2000 Midterm I + Solutions
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Midterm examination for a class at MIT covering game theory and its ...

Midterm examination for a class at MIT covering game theory and its applications to economics. The one-hour-and-twenty-minute open book examination asks open ended theoretical questions. The exam contains questions and solutions.

Subject:
Mathematics
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Provider:
TeachingWithData.org
Provider Set:
TeachingWithData.org
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Muhamet Yildiz
The 2011 California Public Child Welfare Workforce Study: American Indian/Native American Staff
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Remix and Share
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This data brief, part of the California Public Child Welfare Workforce Studies, ...

This data brief, part of the California Public Child Welfare Workforce Studies, provides statistics on American Indian/Native American child welfare workers who responded to the 2011 Agency Administrative and Individual Worker surveys.

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Data Set
Provider:
California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC)
Provider Set:
CalSWEC Evaluating Training
Author:
California Social Work Education Center
2012 Election Issues: Democracy & the Citizens United Case
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Students will: share their associations with the term "democracy"; come up with ...

Students will: share their associations with the term "democracy"; come up with a working definition for democracy; consider other forms of government besides democracy by discussing a Winston Churchill quote; watch and discuss in small groups an animated short on the history of the Supreme Court case of Citizens United versus FEC; for homework, research the liberal and conservative perspectives on Citizens United versus FEC; for the next lesson, participate in a dialogue with one half of students presenting the liberal perspective and the other half presenting the conservative perspective.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Marieke van Woerkom
2012-III - Teorías de la personalidad
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Material de apoyo y materiales utilizados en el curso «Teorías de la ...

Material de apoyo y materiales utilizados en el curso «Teorías de la personalidad» a desarrollarse en el semestre académico 2012 - III, a cargo de Víctor MIranda Vargas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Provider:
OER Commons
Provider Set:
Open Author Resources
Author:
Victor Miranda Vargas
2014 CAR Management Briefing Seminars
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This resource contains presentations from the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) 2014 ...

This resource contains presentations from the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) 2014 Management Briefing Seminars held August 4-7, 2014. With attendees from industry, government, media, and academia, the event featured outstanding presentations from industry thought leaders as well as various networking and social events. Using CAR research as a foundation, these seminars revolved around the most important issues facing the automotive industry today: manufacturing, powertrain, sales forecasting, connected and automated vehicles, purchasing, talent, and supply chain.

Subject:
Engineering
Automotive Technology and Repair
Manufacturing
Education
Economics
Material Type:
Case Study
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Center for Automotive Technology - Macomb
Provider Set:
Center for Advanced Automotive Technology
Author:
Center for Automotive Research (CAR)
2. Foundations of American Government
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The American colonies began developing a democratic tradition during their earliest stages ...

The American colonies began developing a democratic tradition during their earliest stages of development. Over 150 years later, the colonists believed their experience was great enough to refuse to recognize the British king. The first decade was rocky. The American Revolution and the domestic instability that followed prompted a call for a new type of government with a constitution to guarantee liberty. The constitution drafted in the early days of the independent American republic has endured longer than any in human history.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
2a. "I Love Lucy"
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Lucy belonged to genus Australopithecus and the species afarensis, but she also ...

Lucy belonged to genus Australopithecus and the species afarensis, but she also belonged to the the hominid family (hominidae) to which humans belong. Although humans are of the family hominidae, we are not of Lucy's genus or species. We are Homo sapiens. How then, can Lucy be our ancient ancestor if we belong to a different genus and species? It's because humans and Lucy share a taxonomy up to the point of genus and species; there are many shared characteristics, but there are differences and these differences place humans in our own genus and species.

Subject:
Ancient History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
2a. The Colonial Experience
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The great expanse of the Atlantic Ocean created a safe distance for ...

The great expanse of the Atlantic Ocean created a safe distance for American colonists to develop skills to govern themselves. Despite its efforts to control American trade, England could not possibly oversee the entire American coastline. Colonial merchants soon learned to operate outside British law. Finally, those who escaped religious persecution in England demanded the freedom to worship according to their faiths.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
2b. Independence and the Articles of Confederation
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So the freedom that the American Revolution sought to preserve proved to ...

So the freedom that the American Revolution sought to preserve proved to create a government under the Articles of Confederation that could not keep law and order. But the failure of the initial experiment helped the founders to find a more perfect balance between liberty and order in the Constitution they produced in 1787.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
2c. Creating the Constitution
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Most of the delegates at the Constitutional Convention had already risked being ...

Most of the delegates at the Constitutional Convention had already risked being hanged as traitors by the British. No wonder that they worried about their states' reactions to their decision to abandon the Articles of Confederation and create a whole new document.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
2d. The Bill of Rights
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States cherished their new freedom from British control, and ratification of the ...

States cherished their new freedom from British control, and ratification of the Constitution by state legislatures was by no means certain. All thirteen states finally ratified by 1790, but only with the addition of ten amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, that guaranteed citizens' rights and freedoms.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
3. Federalism
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Did you ever wonder why you don't need a passport to go ...

Did you ever wonder why you don't need a passport to go from New York to California, but if you were to move from one state to another, you would need a new driver's license? Or why you can use the same currency in all states, but not be subject to the same speed limits? Or why you have to pay both federal and state taxes?

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
3a. The Founders and Federalism
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The founders very carefully divided powers between federal and state governments. They ...

The founders very carefully divided powers between federal and state governments. They were responding to both the colonial aversion to the tyranny of King George III as well as the failure of the Articles of Confederation. Their careful separating and blending of state and national powers guarded against tyranny, allowed for more citizen participation in government, and provided a mechanism for incorporating new policies and programs.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government