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Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Religion
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Where did the universe come from? Is life a result of chance, or design? If God is loving and all-powerful, why does evil still exist? Is religious belief just a byproduct of undirected evolutionary processes? Or did God make sure humans would evolve in such a way as to believe? Are philosophers closed-minded about religion? And why is so much of philosophy of religion about God—but not about gods?

Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Religion introduces students to some of the major traditional arguments for and against the existence of God. It also includes discussions of some less well-known, but thought-provoking arguments for the existence of God, and one of the most important new challenges to religious belief from the Cognitive Science of Religion. An introductory chapter traces the deep interconnections between philosophy and religion throughout Western history, and a final chapter considers what place there is for non-Western and non-monotheistic religions within contemporary philosophy of religion.

Whatever your religious beliefs—or lack of beliefs—we think you will find many of the arguments in this book fascinating to think about, and useful starting points for deeper philosophical discussions.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Beau Branson
Beau Branson (Book Editor)
Christina Hendricks (Series Editor)
Hans Van Eyghen
Marcus William Hunt
Robert Sloan Lee
Steven Steyl
Timothy D Knepper
Date Added:
12/11/2020
Philosophy of Religion Series
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This series of eight audio lectures delivered by Dr T. J. Mawson at the University of Oxford in Hilary Term 2011, introduces the main philosophical arguments pertaining to the Western monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Each lecture has an associated hand-out (two for the first lecture).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
T. J. Mawson
Date Added:
05/02/2012
Remix
Religion
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Discuss the historical view of religion from a sociological perspectiveUnderstand how the major sociological paradigms view religion

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Author:
Audra Kallimanis
Date Added:
07/02/2020
Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Mind
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Mind (edited by Heather Salazar) surveys the central themes in philosophy of mind and places them in a historical and contemporary context intended to engage first-time readers in the field. It focuses on debates about the status and character of the mind and its seemingly subjective nature in an apparently more objective world.

Written by experts and emerging researchers in their subject areas, each chapter brings clarity to complex material and involves the reader through a wealth of examples. Many chapters include applications of the concepts to film and literature that will stimulate readers to firmly grasp the significance of the philosophy of mind. Subjects covered are how the mind fits into the material world and how to analyze its properties. In that vein, substance dualism, materialism, behaviorism, functionalism, and property dualism are all explored.

In addition, it includes insightful contributions on how to explain seemingly subjective feelings, the mystery of consciousness, conceptual understanding of the world outside of the mind, and free will. The book is designed to be used alone or alongside a reader of historical and contemporary original sources.

If you are adopting or adapting this book for a course, please let us know on our adoption form for the Introduction to Philosophy open textbook series: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdwf2E7bRGvWefjhNZ07kgpgnNFxVxxp-iidPE5gfDBQNGBGg/viewform?usp=sf_link.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Christina Hendricks
Daniel Haas
Elly Vintiadis
Eran Asoulin
Heather Salazar
Henry Shevlin
Jason Newman
Paul Richard Blum
Tony Cheng
Date Added:
09/20/2019
An Introduction to Philosophy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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The goal of this text is to present philosophy to newcomers as a living discipline with historical roots. While a few early chapters are historically organized, the goal in the historical chapters is to trace a developmental progression of thought that introduces basic philosophical methods and frames issues that remain relevant today. Later chapters are topically organized. These include philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, areas where philosophy has shown dramatic recent progress. This text concludes with four chapters on ethics, broadly construed. Traditional theories of right action is covered in a third of these. Students are first invited first to think about what is good for themselves and their relationships in a chapter of love and happiness. Next a few meta-ethical issues are considered; namely, whether they are moral truths and if so what makes them so. The end of the ethics sequence addresses social justice, what it is for one's community to be good. Our sphere of concern expands progressively through these chapters. Our inquiry recapitulates the course of development into moral maturity. Over the course of the text, the author has tried to outline the continuity of thought that leads from the historical roots of philosophy to a few of the diverse areas of inquiry that continue to make significant contributions to our understanding of ourselves and the world we live in.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
W. Russ Payne
Date Added:
07/10/2019
Moral and Political Philosophy
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CC BY
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This course introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of moral and political philosophy. Its primary focus is on the development of moral reasoning skills and the application of those skills to contemporary social and political issues. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Discuss several major theories of justice and morality, including utilitarianism, libertarianism, social contract theory, deontology, and the ethics/politics of virtue; Demonstrate how moral and political dilemmas are handled differently by each set of theoretical principles; Develop their analytical skills through interpreting the consequences of various moral principles and revising principles to correspond with their own conceptions of justice; Discuss the relationship between morality and politics; Formulate their own positions concerning moral and political principles, especially in regards to particular issues discussed in this course; Discuss the origins of western democratic politics and constitutional government; Address a range of difficult and controversial moral and political issues, including murder, the income tax, corporate cost-benefit analysis, lying, affirmative action, and same-sex marriage. (Philosophy 103)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011
Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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We often make judgments about good and bad, right and wrong. Philosophical ethics is the critical examination of these and other concepts central to how we evaluate our own and each others’ behavior and choices.

This text examines some of the main threads of discussion on these topics that have developed over the last couple of millenia, mostly within the Western cultural tradition. It considers basic questions about moral and ethical judgment: Is there such a thing as something that is really right or really wrong independent of time, place and perspective? What is the relationship between religion and ethics? How can we reconcile self-interest and ethics? Is it ever acceptable to harm one person in order to help others? What do recent discussions in evolutionary biology or have to say about human moral systems? What is the relation between gender and ethics? The authors invite you to participate in their exploration of these and many other questions in philosophical ethics.

If you are adopting or adapting this book for a course, please let us know on our adoption form for the Introduction to Philosophy open textbook series: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdwf2E7bRGvWefjhNZ07kgpgnNFxVxxp-iidPE5gfDBQNGBGg/viewform?usp=sf_link.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Christina Hendricks (Series Editor)
Douglas Giles
Frank Aragbonfoh Abumere
George Matthews (Book Editor)
Jeffrey Morgan
Joseph Kranak
Kathryn MacKay
Michael Klenk
Paul Rezkalla
Ya-Yun (Sherry) Kao
Date Added:
12/18/2019
The Originals: Classic Readings in Western Philosophy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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It is important for students not only to get an appreciation and understanding of philosophy but also to be exposed to the very words and ideas of those who have shaped our thinking over the centuries. Accordingly, the title of this collection hints at the facts that these readings are from the original sources and that these philosophers were the originators of many of the issues we still discuss today. Major areas of philosophy covered here are: Ethics, Epistemology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Religion, Ethics, Socio-Political Philosophy, and finally, Aesthetics.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Jeff McLaughlin
Date Added:
08/10/2018
Words of Wisdom: Intro to Philosophy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Words of Wisdom can come from anyone. In this text we discuss topics ranging from "Are Humans good by nature?" to "Is there a God?" to "Do I have the right to my own opinion?" Philosophy is the study of wisdom, and can emerge in our conversations in places like social media, in school, around the family dinner table, and even in the car. The text uses materials that are 2,500 years old, and materials that were in the news this year. Wise people come in all shapes and types, and from every culture on earth. We have poetry and folktales, sacred writings and letters. Dialogues and interviews, news columns, podcasts, Ted Talks, You Tube recordings and even comedy are all a part of the content in this text.You will be most successful using this collection this on line.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Jody Ondich
Date Added:
01/01/2018
Introducing Philosophy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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3.0 stars

Ever wondered what it would be like to study philosophy? This unit will introduce you to the teaching methods employed and the types of activities and assignments you would be asked to undertake should you wish to study OU course A211 Philosophy and the human situation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
General Philosophy Lectures
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. Taking a chronological view of the history of philosophy, each lecture is split into 3 or 4 sections which outline a particular philosophical problem and how different philosophers have attempted to resolve the issue. Individuals interested in the 'big' questions about life such as how we perceive the world, who we are in the world and whether we are free to act will find this series informative, comprehensive and accessible.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Peter Millican
Date Added:
02/19/2010
An Introduction to Philosophy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

The goal of this text is to present philosophy to newcomers as a living discipline with historical roots. While a few early chapters are historically organized, my goal in the historical chapters is to trace a developmental progression of thought that introduces basic philosophical methods and frames issues that remain relevant today. Later chapters are topically organized. These include philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, areas where philosophy has shown dramatic recent progress. This text concludes with four chapters on ethics, broadly construed. I cover traditional theories of right action in the third of these. Students are first invited first to think about what is good for themselves and their relationships in a chapter of love and happiness. Next a few meta-ethical issues are considered; namely, whether they are moral truths and if so what makes them so. The end of the ethics sequence addresses social justice, what it is for one’s community to be good. Our sphere of concern expands progressively through these chapters. Our inquiry recapitulates the course of development into moral maturity

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bellevue College
Author:
W. Russ Payne
Date Added:
08/29/2018
Remix
An Introduction to Philosophy, Second Edition
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

The goal of this text is to present philosophy to newcomers as a living discipline with historical roots. While a few early chapters are historically organized, the goal in the historical chapters is to trace a developmental progression of thought that introduces basic philosophical methods and frames issues that remain relevant today. Later chapters are topically organized. These include philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, areas where philosophy has shown dramatic recent progress. This text concludes with four chapters on ethics, broadly construed. Traditional theories of right action is covered in a third of these. Students are first invited first to think about what is good for themselves and their relationships in a chapter of love and happiness. Next a few meta-ethical issues are considered; namely, whether they are moral truths and if so what makes them so. The end of the ethics sequence addresses social justice, what it is for one’s community to be good. Our sphere of concern expands progressively through these chapters. Our inquiry recapitulates the course of development into moral maturity. Over the course of the text, the author has tried to outline the continuity of thought that leads from the historical roots of philosophy to a few of the diverse areas of inquiry that continue to make significant contributions to our understanding of ourselves and the world we live in.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Marc Skuster
Date Added:
09/18/2020
Introduction to Sociology 2e, Religion, The Sociological Approach to Religion
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Discuss the historical view of religion from a sociological perspectiveUnderstand how the major sociological paradigms view religion

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
11/15/2016
Modern Philosophy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

This is a textbook (or better, a workbook) in modern philosophy. It combines readings from primary sources with two pedagogical tools. Paragraphs in italics introduce figures and texts. Numbered study questions (also in italics) ask students to reconstruct an argument or position from the text, or draw connections among the readings. And I have added an introductory chapter (Chapter 0 – Minilogic and Glossary), designed to present the basic tools of philosophy and sketch some principles and positions. The immediate goal is to encourage students to grapple with the ideas rather than passing their eyes over the texts. This makes for a better classroom experience and permits higher-level discussions. Another goal is to encourage collaboration among instructors, as they revise and post their own versions of the book.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Faculty Reviewed Open Textbooks
Author:
Dunn, Alexander
Ott, Walter
Date Added:
02/06/2015
Imagination: The Missing Mystery of Philosophy
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CC BY-NC-SA
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What is imagination and can philosophy define it in any meaningful way? This unit will introduce you to some of the possible answers to these questions and will examine why philosophy has sometimes found it difficult to approach imagination. It will then go on to examine the relationship that imagination has to imagery and supposition, charting where these concepts overlap with imagination and where they diverge.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Philosophy Ethics Syllabus
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

Philosophy Ethics Syllabus

PHL 202: Ethics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Explores basic problems in moral and social philosophy along with issues related to
human nature, for example: how to define a good life or a good society; what is the
nature of happiness, pleasure, virtue and justice; consequence vs. duty-based
theories; the role of reason and/or passion; and arguments for and against natural
law.

LEARNING OUTCOMES. Students will learn to:
1. Demonstrate understanding of major ethical theories and problems in the
Western Tradition through written and oral discussion.
2. Assess arguments and philosophical perspectives using critical reasoning.
3. Express complex thoughts logically and coherently.
4. Apply knowledge of ethical perspectives, theories, and critical reasoning to
develop his or her own opinions regarding philosophical problems and issues.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Sean Creighton
Date Added:
03/08/2021
Political Philosophy & Justice: The Options
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Below is a handout I created that covers *some* of the "space of logical possibility" for how communities might organize themselves around different conceptions of justice. This handout draws from the "space of actuality possibility" or the different sorts of political arrangements that have appeared in the western world over the past 2,500 years. My aim was to give an overview via the three criteria of who rules, who counts as a citizen, and the distribution of goods. As a two page handout, it is necessarily incomplete but hopefully it serves as a good starting point for students new to political philosophy.

I placed a photo that I took below from the new Modesto mural project that appeared downtown in the past month.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Module
Author:
Bill Anelli
Date Added:
11/25/2019
Philosophy of Education Lesson
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

I have used this assigned discussion with students enrolled in Education 203: Education in American Society, offered at Los Angeles Valley College.  This assignment is one of several that address the philosophy of education, particularly Paolo Freire's view of critical pedagogy.  The lesson was preceeded by two modules that presented the use of graphic organizers, hence the assignment involves a Thinking Map.  The assignment can be modified with a different manner of demonstrating knowledge other than graphic organizers. Attribution: Thinking Maps:  https://www.thinkingmaps.com/

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Jennifer Niwa
Date Added:
06/29/2020