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General Philosophy Lectures
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A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students ...

A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. Taking a chronological view of the history of philosophy, each lecture is split into 3 or 4 sections which outline a particular philosophical problem and how different philosophers have attempted to resolve the issue. Individuals interested in the 'big' questions about life such as how we perceive the world, who we are in the world and whether we are free to act will find this series informative, comprehensive and accessible.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Peter Millican
Introduction to Philosophy
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This course introduces students to the major topics, problems, and methods of ...

This course introduces students to the major topics, problems, and methods of philosophy and surveys the writings of a number of major historical figures in the field. Several of the core areas of philosophy are explored, including metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, ethics, and the philosophy of religion. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify and describe the major areas of philosophical inquiry, explain how those areas differ from and relate to one another, and place the views and arguments of major philosophical figures within those thematic categories; Use philosophical terminology correctly and consistently; Identify and describe the views of a number of major philosophers and articulate how these views are created in response to general philosophical problems or to the views of other philosophers; Explain the broad outlines of the history of philosophy as a framework that can be applied in more advanced courses; Identify strengths and weaknesses in the arguments philosophers have put forward for their views and formulate objections and counterarguments of your own invention; Apply critical thinking and reasoning skills in a wide range of career paths and courses of study. (Philosophy 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
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Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance, Spring 2009
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" This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific ...

" This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special attention to the "theatricality" of the new models and perspectives afforded by scientific experimentation, the class will read plays by Shakespeare, Tate, Brecht, Ford, Churchill, and Kushner, as well as primary and secondary texts from a wide range of disciplines. Students will also compose and perform in scenes based on that material."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Philosophy
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Astronomy
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Henderson, Diana
Sonenberg, Janet
Darwin and Design, Fall 2010
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Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our ...

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
James Paradis
The Perseus Digital Library
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Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and ...

Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and language. Our primary goal is to bring a wide range of source materials to as large an audience as possible. We anticipate that greater accessibility to the sources for the study of the humanities will strengthen the quality of questions, lead to new avenues of research, and connect more people through the connection of ideas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Education
Composition and Rhetoric
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Internet Scout Project
Tufts University
Provider Set:
Internet Scout Project
Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities, Spring 2004
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The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the ...

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the `New World'. In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon is primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti; yet some of its structures seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties seem to have no analogues in any of the source languages. Through a sample of linguistic case studies focusing on Haitian Creole morphosyntax, we will explore creolization from a cognitive, historical and comparative perspective. Using Haitian Creole and some of its Caribbean congeners as test cases, we will evaluate various hypotheses about the development of Creole languages and about the role of first- and second-language acquisition in such development. We will also explore the concept of Creolization in its non-linguistic senses. Then we will address questions of "Caribbean identities" by examining a sample of Creole speakers' attitudes toward the Creole language and the corresponding European language and toward the African and European components of their ethnic make-up.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Linguistics
Material Type:
Case Study
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
DeGraff, Michel
The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability, Spring 2008
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The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in ...

The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course therefore aims to broaden students’ appreciation for and understanding of how literature interacts with--both reflecting upon and contributing to--the scientific understanding of the world. We are just as centrally committed to encouraging students to regard imaginative literature as a unique contribution to knowledge in its own right, and to see literary works of art as objects that demand and richly repay close critical analysis. It is our hope that the course will serve students well if they elect to pursue further work in Literature or other discipline in SHASS, and also enrich or complement their understanding of probability and statistics in other scientific and engineering subjects they elect to take.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jackson, Noel
Kibel, Alvin
Raman, Shankar
The Perseus Digital Library
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Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and ...

Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and language. Our primary goal is to bring a wide range of source materials to as large an audience as possible. We anticipate that greater accessibility to the sources for the study of the humanities will strengthen the quality of questions, lead to new avenues of research, and connect more people through the connection of ideas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Tufts University
The Perseus Digital Library
Rating

Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and ...

Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and language. Our primary goal is to bring a wide range of source materials to as large an audience as possible. We anticipate that greater accessibility to the sources for the study of the humanities will strengthen the quality of questions, lead to new avenues of research, and connect more people through the connection of ideas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Tufts University
The Invention of French Theory: A History of Transatlantic Intellectual Life since 1945, Spring 2012
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In the decades following the Second World War, a cluster of extraordinary ...

In the decades following the Second World War, a cluster of extraordinary French thinkers were widely translated and read in American universities. Their works were soon labeled as "French Theory." Why would sharing the same nationality make authors such as Lacan, Cixous, Derrida, Foucault or Debord, ambassadors of a specifically "French" theory? The course will explore the maze of transatlantic intellectual debates since 1945 and the heyday of French existentialism. We will study the debates on communism, decolonization, neo_liberalism, gender, youth culture and mass media. This course is taught in English.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
World Cultures
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bruno Perreau
European Thought and Culture, Spring 2008
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This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in ...

This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe. The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. Among the topics to be considered: the critique of religion, the promise of independence, the advance of capitalism, the temptations of Marxism, the origins of totalitarianism, and the dialects of enlightenment. In addition to texts, we will also discuss pieces of art, incl. paintings and film.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Nolden, Tom
Bridging World History
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Bridging World History is a multimedia course for secondary school and college ...

Bridging World History is a multimedia course for secondary school and college teachers that looks at global patterns through time, seeing history as an integrated whole. Topics are studied in a general chronological order, but each is examined through a thematic lens, showing how people and societies experience both integration and differences. The course consists of 26 units (half-hour video, interactive Web activities, and print materials) that can be explored at either introductory levels or as more advanced study. The course videos feature interviews with leading world history textbook authors and nationally known historians. The Web site includes an archive of over 1000 primary source documents and artifacts, journal articles from the Journal of World History and other publications, and a thematic interactive activity on interrelationships across time and place.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
Education
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Annenberg Learner
Internet Scout Project
Provider Set:
Internet Scout Project
Political Philosophy: Global Justice, Spring 2003
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Systematic examination of selected issues in political philosophy. Topic changes each year ...

Systematic examination of selected issues in political philosophy. Topic changes each year and subject may be taken repeatedly with permission of instructor. Offered together with a Harvard subject. This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cohen, Joshua
Moral and Political Philosophy
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This course introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of moral ...

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of moral and political philosophy. Its primary focus is on the development of moral reasoning skills and the application of those skills to contemporary social and political issues. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Discuss several major theories of justice and morality, including utilitarianism, libertarianism, social contract theory, deontology, and the ethics/politics of virtue; Demonstrate how moral and political dilemmas are handled differently by each set of theoretical principles; Develop their analytical skills through interpreting the consequences of various moral principles and revising principles to correspond with their own conceptions of justice; Discuss the relationship between morality and politics; Formulate their own positions concerning moral and political principles, especially in regards to particular issues discussed in this course; Discuss the origins of western democratic politics and constitutional government; Address a range of difficult and controversial moral and political issues, including murder, the income tax, corporate cost-benefit analysis, lying, affirmative action, and same-sex marriage. (Philosophy 103)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia, Fall 2003
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Examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and ...

Examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Britain and Russia competed for power over Eurasia in the "Great Game" of geopolitics in the nineteenth century, just as China, Russia, and others did in the twentieth century. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened new opportunities for cultural interaction. Topics include: the religious traditions of Central Asian Islam, Buddhism, Christianity, and Confucianism; caravans and travelers like Marco Polo and Rabban Sauma, the first Chinese to travel to the West; and nomadic conquest and imperialist competition, past and present. Source materials include primary documents, travelogues, films, music, and museum visits.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Perdue, Peter C.
Culture Talk: Yemeni Arabic
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CultureTalk - Arab World features native speakers from across the Arabic-speaking world ...

CultureTalk - Arab World features native speakers from across the Arabic-speaking world giving filmed interviews, in Arabic and sometimes English, on selected topics. Text-based translations and transcriptions are often provided as downloadable documents for most Arabic videos. The videos engage a number of region/country-specific topics, including cultural traditions, religion, politics, and sports.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
Economics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Five College Center for the Study of World Languages
International Women's Voices, Spring 2004
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International Women's Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety ...

International Women's Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author's work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of women in patriarchal cultures, and how, in the imaginary world, authors resolve or understand the relationship of the characters to love, work, identity, sex roles, marriage and politics.This class is a communication intensive course. In addition to becoming more thoughtful readers, students are expected to become a more able and more confident writers. Assignments are designed to allow for revision of each paper. The class will also offer opportunities for speaking and debating so that students can build oral presentation skills that are essential for success once they leave MIT. The class is limited to 25 students and there is substantial classroom discussion.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Margery
Resnick
LookLex
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Looklex Encyclopedia is a Norway based media whose intent is to introduce ...

Looklex Encyclopedia is a Norway based media whose intent is to introduce and present the diverse countries in North Africa and the Middle East along with their cultures to a predominantly western audience. This resource offers a variety of accredited articles in the fields of education, religion, modern countries, languages, economy, health, politics, ancient civilizations and much more. The encyclopedia also offers an atlas of several civilizations throughout different time periods in addition to travel guides.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
LexicOrient
Vocabulary Words: Holidays and Traditions
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This list presents a basic set of vocabulary words that deal with ...

This list presents a basic set of vocabulary words that deal with categories of holidays, traditions, and religion, including various religious sects, acts of worship, houses of worship, and theological concepts. The list also refers to non-religious ideologies, and sacred scriptures. The majority of words contained within the website are nouns, and some verbs are interspersed. The words and verbs are presented in both Modern Standard Arabic and Egyptian colloquial. All of the words feature Arabic script and transliteration.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Arabic Desert Sky