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  • University of Cape Town
"Because the Country Says They Have to Change"
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The shift from apartheid to a constitutional democracy in South Africa brought with it a plethora of questions concerning ideas of nationhood, citizenship, and organisational transformation. Integrally caught up in the revolution, the South African Police Service (SAPS) faces transformative challenges on scales far larger than most other organisations in the country. From being the strong arm of the oppressive elite, it has had to restructure and rearticulate its function, while simultaneously attempting to maintain law and order. Like many other corporations and organisations, the SAPS has engaged in interventions aimed at aiding the fluidity of this process. This report is an analysis of one such intervention. It attempts to ascertain the extent to which members are changing as a result of particular diversity workshops conducted in a region of the Western Cape. The analysis focuses on members at one particular station.

Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
University of Cape Town
Author:
Andrew
Faull
Date Added:
01/23/2012
Biomedical Engineering for Africa
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Health technology innovation in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), including countries in Africa, falls far short of meeting the healthcare needs of these settings. The result is a heavy reliance on products and technologies imported from industrialised countries that are often not suited to, or sustainable for, LMICs.

Appropriate healthcare products for LMICs are best developed in these countries, where local knowledge and understanding of needs, context and available resources may be incorporated into designs and implementation plans. The objectives for enabling health technology development in LMICs include: 1) expanding the base of expertise through research training programmes with a problem-solving focus; 2) stimulating new knowledge, approaches and solutions by enabling innovation; and 3) integrating research communities within and across institutions to build critical mass.

The field of biomedical engineering is central to health technology innovation. This book is a response to the need for biomedical engineering capacity in Africa. It is grounded in the African context. It serves as a resource for academics and students in biomedical engineering, for those interested in entering the field in any capacity and for practitioners at every stage of product development. University leaders intent on establishing new biomedical engineering programmes or departments, may draw on the content for guidance on structuring their offerings. The book reaches beyond Africa, as it is relevant to other LMIC settings, and provides insights to guide global health initiatives focused on technology innovation.

Subject:
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Cape Town
Author:
Tania S Douglas
Date Added:
11/10/2022
Global Citizenship, Cultural Citizenship and World Religions in Religion Education
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An examination of the reasons for studying religion and religions, and the necessity for educator, student, administrative, or parental involvement in the process of teaching and learning about religious diversity. In this paper, Chidester tests one possible answer to these questions - namely citizenship - and suggests that the study of religion, religions, and religious diversity, can usefully be brought into conversation with recent research on new formations of citizenship.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Cape Town
Author:
Chidester, David
Date Added:
01/23/2012
Isaac Newton and His Enemies
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David Wolfe, Emeritus Professor of Physics, University of New Mexico, and Director, Oppenheimer Institute for Science and International Cooperation. Isaac Newton has a good claim to being the most famous man of the last 500 years. Whilst no individual can claim to be the originator of what has come to be called the Scientific Revolution, surely Isaac Newton is more responsible than any other single person. If we look at the technology on which our modern world is based - from the existence of electricity to transport to telecommunications and much else - all are based on the science which developed from the 18th century onwards. The Enlightenment, itself, and the concept of the individual, all developed as a result of his thinking. Even the reaction to these ideas from Romanticism to Fascism came about because of the rise of intellectual enquiry. Yet Newton does not fit the picture of 'the scientist' that we hold today. He spent more of his life thinking about alchemy and religion than he did about mathematics or physics. Moreover, he was one of history's greatest misanthropes. Left by his mother at three years of age, he appears never to have recovered from that trauma. This course will investigate Newton's life and work in relation to his achievements and also to his arguments with such people as Robert Hooke, John Flamsteed - the first Astronomer Royal, and Gottfried Leibniz- the codiscoverer of the calculus. An astounding genius, Newton was a deeply flawed human being.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Cape Town
Author:
Wolfe, David
Date Added:
01/23/2012
A Schematic Introduction to the Anatomy of the Inguinal Canal
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This video is intended for students of clinical anatomy. It is a schematic introduction to the anatomy and function of the inguinal canal.

A Powerpoint version of this presentation (without video) can be found at http://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/2513

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Cape Town
Provider Set:
Vula
Date Added:
11/17/2016