Search Results (18)

View
Selected filters:
  • Prejudice
Every Family Is the Same. Every Family Is Different.
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson is the third in a series called ŇFamily Tapestry.Ó One goal of these lessons is to help students recognize and accept differences among themselves and within the larger community. Another is to recognize how each studentŐs unique family contributes to a richer society. As students begin to understand themselves better, learning opportunities to explore biases and prejudices will likely emerge. In this lesson, students learn the concepts of ŇsameÓ and Ňdifferent,Ó read and answer questions about two types of families, and create a Ňsame and differentÓ graphic organizer that reflects similarities and differences between their family and a classmateŐs family.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
02/20/2013
Introduction to Sociology 2e
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Introduction to Sociology 2e adheres to the scope and sequence of a typical, one-semester introductory sociology course. It offers comprehensive coverage of core concepts, foundational scholars, and emerging theories, which are supported by a wealth of engaging learning materials. The textbook presents detailed section reviews with rich questions, discussions that help students apply their knowledge, and features that draw learners into the discipline in meaningful ways. The second edition retains the book’s conceptual organization, aligning to most courses, and has been significantly updated to reflect the latest research and provide examples most relevant to today’s students. In order to help instructors transition to the revised version, the 2e changes are described within the preface.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/01/2012
Introduction to Sociology 2e, Race and Ethnicity, Stereotypes, Prejudice, and Discrimination
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Explain the difference between stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, and racismIdentify different types of discriminationView racial tension through a sociological lens

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
My Family Journey!
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson is the second in the series "Family Tapestry.Ó One goal of these lessons is to help students recognize and accept differences among themselves and within the larger community. Another is to recognize how each studentŐs unique family contributes to a richer society. As students begin to understand themselves better, learning opportunities will likely emerge to explore biases and prejudices. In this lesson, students explore how their familyŐs ethnic and cultural journey contributes to their lives and to their community.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
02/20/2013
My Family Rocks!
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson is the first in the series ŇFamily Tapestry.Ó One goal of these lessons is to help students recognize and accept differences among themselves and within the larger community. Another is to recognize how each studentŐs unique family contributes to a richer society. As students begin to understand themselves better, learning opportunities will likely emerge to explore biases and prejudices. In this introductory lesson, students explore the definition of family, learn about different kinds of family structures and explore what makes their own family unique.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
02/20/2013
Neuroscience and Society, Spring 2010
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subject:
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
SchĺŮll, Natasha
Date Added:
01/01/2011
On the Road Again
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The movement of people and goods is an important part of the New York State Global History and Geography Curriculum. It is listed as one of the themes that are emphasized in the core curriculum. Students are expected to understand why people migrate and what the impact of migrations has been on people, nations, and regions. Recently, the PBS WIDE ANGLE documentary series created two programs that relate to the movement of people. 'Border Jumpers' (2005) documents migration between countries in Africa, and 'To Have and Have Not' (2002) deals with migration from rural to urban areas in China. By studying these two migrations, students can deepen their understanding of events and trends in Africa and China since World War II. A study of these two migrations can also provide students with a framework for reviewing other migrations included in the core curriculum and help students to prepare for possible thematic essays on the Regents exam. The purpose of this lesson is to show the reasons why people are migrating in Africa and China today and how these migrations are impacting those regions. In addition, students will be motivated to critically analyze national immigration policies and to consider the relevance of national borders in a world that is experiencing rapid globalization. As a culminating activity, students will outline a response for a sample Regents thematic essay question and will be assigned to write the essay for homework.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Thirteen/WNET New York
Provider Set:
WIDE ANGLE: Window into Global History
Author:
Matthew Roberts
Date Added:
05/19/2006
Psychology
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Psychology is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe.Senior Contributing AuthorsRose M. Spielman, Formerly of Quinnipiac UniversityContributing AuthorsKathryn Dumper, Bainbridge State CollegeWilliam Jenkins, Mercer UniversityArlene Lacombe, Saint Joseph's UniversityMarilyn Lovett, Livingstone CollegeMarion Perlmutter, University of Michigan

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/14/2014
Psychology, Social Psychology, Prejudice and Discrimination
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Define and distinguish among prejudice, stereotypes, and discriminationProvide examples of prejudice, stereotypes, and discriminationExplain why prejudice and discrimination exist

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Psychology, Stress, Lifestyle, and Health, Regulation of Stress
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Define coping and differentiate between problem-focused and emotion-focused copingDescribe the importance of perceived control in our reactions to stressExplain how social support is vital in health and longevity

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Social Psychology
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce you to the concepts of social psychology, which focuses primarily on the individual's psychology as part of the group or society. Because humans are social creatures and almost invariably exist in a social context, social psychology deals with a huge range of aspects of human life, including love, attraction, aggression, helping behaviors (or altruism), and obedience. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify the specific areas of research interest within the field of social psychology; Read and understand articles pertaining to experiments and other empirical research in the field of social psychology; Outline the basic methodology, results, and impact of seminal research studies in social psychology (e.g., Milgram's study, Asch's study, Festinger's study, etc.); Explain how the notion of the 'self' contributes to cognitive processes in social interaction; Demonstrate an awareness of the main research findings in the area of social persuasion; Define the term 'attitude' and identify the mechanisms behind attitude change; Discuss the cognitive and affective theories/components linked to stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination; Identify the basic properties of and factors involved in interpersonal attraction and the formation and maintenance of relationships; Demonstrate an awareness of the breadth and importance of social psychological research and its impact in the field of psychology. (Psychology 301)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Stitching It Together
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson is the fourth and final in a series called ŇFamily Tapestry.Ó One goal of these lessons is to help students recognize and accept differences among themselves and within the larger community. Another is to recognize how each studentŐs unique family contributes to a richer society. As students begin to understand themselves better, learning opportunities to explore biases and prejudices will likely emerge. In this lesson, students will synthesize everything theyŐve learned throughout the series to create a quilt that tells the story of their families and how those families contribute to their overall classroom community.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
02/20/2013
This Land is Our Land
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Throughout history, as the concepts of empire and nation-states took hold, individual countries secured their borders and tried to keep unwanted migrants out. As we enter the 21st century Anwarul K. Chowdhury, an Under-Secretary of the United Nations, says, 'The first step towards examining the road to peace should start with an appreciation of the changing nature of conflicts. Gone are days of war between states for conquest, extension of spheres of influence in the name of ideology ... Today's wars are about settling border disputes....' In these lessons students confront that issue. Students begin by discussing why people cross borders and the rights people have when they enter another country. Students will discover the factors that determine the location of borders through the examination of maps, cartoons, and primary source documents. After completing this introductory activity, students will analyze a chart comparing the economic situation in the neighboring countries of Zimbabwe and Botswana, and predict what economic problems each country has. They will then view segments of the WIDE ANGLE film 'Border Jumpers' (2005) to understand why these economic problems exist, develop further arguments for those streaming into Botswana from Zimbabwe and for those in Botswana itself, and compare them to their own predictions. As a culminating activity, students will work in groups to develop a presentation for a simulation of the 17th Annual Nobel Peace Prize Forum. Their presentations will be shared with their classmates, and, if desired, sent to the United Nations.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Thirteen/WNET New York
Provider Set:
WIDE ANGLE: Window into Global History
Author:
Mirla Morrison
Date Added:
05/19/2006