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  • Open Educational Practices
Addressing the Learning Needs of Out-of-School Children and Youths through the Expansion of Open Schooling
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At any one time, about 300 million children of school going age are not in school. Experience indicates that when schooling is disrupted, whether by a pandemic, a natural disaster or other reasons, not all children return to the classroom. In addition, most countries have growing numbers of young people who have not completed schooling, or not well enough to progress, and who find themselves neither in employment nor in further education and training.

Open schooling can create learning opportunities for those not in school, those who left school and those who are in school but not learning effectively. There is no single model for open schooling provision which might offer a complementary or alternative curriculum, or both. However, all models can benefit from greater use of open educational resources; open, distance and flexible methods and open educational practices. In this way it is possible to address issues of access, quality and affordability in a sustainable way.

This book offers guidelines and examples that will be of use to teachers, managers, policy-makers and education leaders interested to ensure that the education system meets the needs of all children and youths.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
Commonwealth of Learning
Author:
Anshul Kharbanda
Chanchal Kr. Singh
Charity Mbolela Bwalya
Dean Dundas
Edwig Karipi
Ephraim Mhlanga
Heroldt Veekama Murangi
Jan Nitschke
Kirston Brindley
Mike Hollings
Rajiv Kumar Singh
Sadia Afroze Sultana
Sandhya Kumar
Sheldon Samuels
Som Naidu
Sukanta K. Mahapatra
Tommie Hamaluba
Tony Mays
Wilhelmina Louw
Yousra Banoor Rajabalee
Date Added:
06/02/2021
Combinations Proven to Work
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This is an interview with Dr. Joy Morris, Professor at the Department for Mathematics and Computer Sciences at the University of Lethbridge on her Open Educational Practices, including the publications of her own textbooks under CC-BY-NC-SA and her open work in the community.

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Joerdis Weilandt
Date Added:
09/26/2017
Introduction to Open Access
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CC BY-SA
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Progress of every profession, academic discipline and society at large rides on the back of research and development. Research generates new information and knowledge. It is a standardized process of identifying problem, collecting data or evidence, tabulating data and its analysis, drawing inference and establishing new facts in the form of information. Information has its life cycle: conception, generation, communication, evaluation and validation, use, impact and lastly a fuel for new ideas. Research results are published in journals, conference proceedings, monographs, dissertations, reports, and now the web provides many a new forum for its communication. Since their origin in the 17th century, the journals have remained very popular and important channels for dissemination of new ideas and research. Journals have become inseparable organ of scholarship and research communication, and are a huge and wide industry. Their proliferation (with high mortality rate), high cost of production, cumbersome distribution, waiting time for authors to get published, and then more time in getting listed in indexing services, increasing subscription rates, and lastly archiving of back volumes have led to a serious problem known as "Serials Crisis". The ICT, especially the internet and the WWW, descended from the cyber space to solve all these problems over night in the new avatar of e-journals. Their inherent features and versatility have made them immensely popular. Then in the beginning of the 21st century emerged the Open Access (OA) movement with the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI). Philosophy of open access is to provide free of charge and unhindered access to research and its publications without copyright restrictions. The movement got support from great scientists, educationists, publishers, research institutions, professional associations and library organizations. The other OA declarations at Berlin and Bethesda put it on strong footings. Its philosophy is: research funded by tax payers should be available free of charge to tax payers. Research being a public good should be available to all irrespective of their paying capacity. The OA has many forms of access and usage varying from total freedom from paying any charges, full permission to copy, download, print, distribute, archive, translate and even change format to its usage with varying restrictions.
In the beginning, OA publications were doubted for their authenticity and quality: established authors and researchers shied away both from contributing to and citing from OA literature. But Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE, 1997) and its code of conduct formulated in collaboration with DOAJ and OASPA, etc. have stemmed the rot. They have defined best practices and compiled principles of transparency for quality control to sift the grain from the chaff; to keep the fraudulent at bay. Now it is accepted that contributors to OA get increased visibility, global presence, increased accessibility, increased collaboration, increased impact both in citations and applications, and lastly instant feedback, comments and critical reflections. This movement has got roots due to its systematic advocacy campaign. Since 2008 every year 21-27 October is celebrated as the OA week throughout the world. There are many organizations which advocate OA through social media and provide guidance for others.
Open Access research literature has not only made new ideas easy and quick to disseminate, but the impact of research can be quantitatively gauged by various bibliometric, scientometric and webometric methods such as h-index, i-10 index, etc. to measure the scientific productivity, its flow, speed and lastly its concrete influence on individuals, and on the progress of a discipline. The OA movement is gaining momentum every day, thanks to technology, organizational efforts for quality control and its measureable impact on productivity and further research. It needs to be strengthened with participation of every researcher, scientist, educationist and librarian. This module covers five units, covering these issues. At the end of this module, you are expected to be able to:
- Define scholarly communication and open access, and promote and differentiate between the various forms of Open Access;
- Explain issues related to rights management, incl. copyright, copy-left, authors’ rights and related intellectual property rights;
- Demonstrate the impact of Open Access within a scholarly communication environment.
This is Module One of the UNESCO's Open Access Curriculum for Library Schools.
Full-Text is available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002319/231920E.pdf.

Subject:
Information Science
Business and Communication
Communication
Career and Technical Education
Educational Technology
Higher Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Module
Textbook
Unit of Study
Author:
Anup Kumar Das
Uma Kanjilal
Date Added:
09/12/2018
OER-Enabled Pedagogy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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OER-Enabled Pedagogy is the set of teaching and learning practices only practical in the context of the 5R permissions characteristic of open educational resources. Some people – but not all – use the terms “open pedagogy” or “open educational practices” synonymously.

The purpose of this page is to provide a list of concrete examples of how OER-enabled pedagogy is implemented in the real world. We’ve kept our descriptions brief and, where possible, linked directly to the artifacts students have created or to articles that provide more information on what they did.

Subject:
Education
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Open Education Group
Date Added:
10/01/2017
Open Learning Experiences "Fortune Teller"
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CC BY
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This fun "fortune teller" is intended to support Open Pedagogy trainings or groups activities. Colors are spelled out along the outside edge to facilitate easier use for those without access to a color printer.

The fortune teller was based on a template found at www.downloadablecootiecatchers.wordpress.com, and was inspired by the excellent OKP Learning Experience Bingo board by Nate Angell: http://xolotl.org/okp-learning-experience-bingo-2-0/

Activity instructions:
1. Select one ingredient from the OKP Learning Experience Bingo board (People, Places, Materials, etc).
2. Select a color and alternate opening one end of the device or another while spelling out the color.
3. Look at the choices of numbers that appear within the device and select one, spelling it out as you did the color.
4. From the available numbers on the open end of your fortune teller, select one and open its compartment to see which Dimension of Openness you have been assigned.
5. Brainstorm an activity or experience that exemplifies that Dimension and relates to your chosen Ingredient from the bingo board.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Abbey K Elder
Date Added:
09/19/2021
Scholarly Communication
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Researchers, scholars and scientists main business is scholarly communication. We communicate about our work to others, as we push the boundaries of what we know and the society knows. We question established notions and truths about science. We share our findings with others, and in a way that is popularly known as scholarly communication which emerged with the publication of first journal in 1665. However, the term gained popularity only in the 1970s, as access to peer reviewed and scholarly communication became difficult. This module has four units covering introduction to scholarly communication, peer reviewed journals, electronica journals and databases and the Serials Crisis. At the end of this module, the learner is expected to be able to:
- Explain philosophy, mission, and objectives of scholarly communication
- Describe the process of scholarly communication
- Identify different channels of scholarly communication
- Discuss the dysfunctioning of the scholarly communication
In Unit 1, Introduction to scholarly communication, we have discussed different aspects of scholarly communication – particularly its genesis, importance and ethics of academic publishing, and different communication channels available in academic publishing. Some of these channels are commonly described as primary sources as they provide first-hand testimony or direct evidence concerning a topic under investigation. Historically, scientific journals were initiated by learned societies and other scholarly communities for reporting results of concluded research works or scientific discoveries. Now many forprofit publishers have started publishing research journals.
Unit 2, Communicating with Peer Review Journals, covers two important academic publishing channels, namely peer reviewed journals, conferences and their proceedings. This Unit also highlights different methods and procedures of peer reviewing for publishing primary literature emanated from research studies. The peer reviewing is essential for validating quality of research findings conveyed by researchers, which are subject to fulfilment of ethical standards and appropriate research design, sampling and other methodological issues.
In Unit 3, Electronic journals and databases, we have discussed the emergence of electronic journals in academic and research environment due to wide proliferation of information and communication technologies (ICT) in research communications and academic publishing. Scientific communities and scientific communications from the global South are getting substantive attentions through adaptation of electronic journals and electronic academic databases in the process of research communications.
In Unit 4, the Serials Crisis, we discuss the cost of peer reviewed publications and the problems faced by researchers in developing countries. The focus of this unit is on highlighting the problems and discusses possible solutions including the emergence of open access as one of the solutions. Open access journal publishing helps in mitigating some of the problems associated with serials crisis.
This is Module One of the UNESCO's Open Access Curriculum for Researchers.
Full-Text is available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002319/231938e.pdf

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Educational Technology
Higher Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Module
Textbook
Unit of Study
Author:
Anup Kumar Das
Date Added:
09/12/2018
Sharing Your Work in Open Access
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This is the last Module of the course on Open Access for researchers. So far you have studied about Open Access, its history, advantages, initiatives, copyrights and licensing, evaluation matrix for research – all in the context of scholarly communication. In this Module with just two units, we would like to help you share your work in Open Access though repositories and journals. At the end of this module, you are expected to be able to:
- Understand the publication process involved in dissemination of scholarly works;
- Choose appropriate Open Access journals and repositories for sharing research results;
- Use social media to promote personal research work and build reputation.
In Unit 1, we discuss the research publication process at five stages – planning stage, preparing stage, pre-publication stage, publication stage and postpublication stage. We emphasize the importance of social media in sharing and making your work visible to the target groups.
In Unit 2, we focus on sharing your research through OA repositories and Journals. First we discussed the different types of repositories to select and highlighted the steps that you may consider including deposit in your own institutional repositories or in global open repositories. We then discuss the sources of finding and deciding on OA journals. This unit also provides guidance on choosing the right OA journals, as the quality of OA journals is often questioned.
This is Module Five of the UNESCO's Open Access Curriculum for Researchers.
Full-Text is available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002322/232211E.pdf

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Career and Technical Education
Educational Technology
Higher Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Module
Textbook
Unit of Study
Author:
Anup Kumar Das
Sanjaya Mishra
Date Added:
09/12/2018
الموارد التعليمية المفتوحة لتطوير التعليم والتعلم
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مع تطور التكنولوجيا و الويب، أصبح من السهل لاي متصفح إيجاد المعلومات و المراجع و أصبح البعض يستعملها دون الاهتمام بالملكية الفكرية و دون التأكد من صحة و نجاعة هذه المعلومات. من أجل حماية الكاتب واتاحة فرص أكبر للمستعمل والتشجيع على اصدار محتوى تعليمي ذي جودة، انتشرت حركة الموارد التعليمية المفتوحة في العالم.
- فماهي هذه الموارد؟ وماهي تراخيص الملكية الفكرية التي تحكم استخدامها؟
- كيف يمكن للأستاذ ان يجدها بسهولة على الوب؟
- كيف تساعده على الابتكار في ظل منهج التعليم المتمركز حول المتعلم؟

كل هذه الأسئلة يطرحها هذا العرض الذي قدم في الملتقى الثاني عشر للتميز لمركز التميز في التعليم و التعلم بجامعة قطر.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
هيفاء بالحاج
Date Added:
02/25/2021