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A Better Way to Talk about Love
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In love, we fall. We're struck, we're crushed, we swoon. We burn with passion. Love makes us crazy and makes us sick. Our hearts ache, and then they break. Talking about love in this way fundamentally shapes how we experience it, says writer Mandy Len Catron. In this talk for anyone who's ever felt crazy in love, Catron highlights a different metaphor for love that may help us find more joy and less suffering in it.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
TED
Author:
Mandy Len Catron
Date Added:
11/01/2015
Biochemistry and Pharmacology of Synaptic Transmission, Fall 2007
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Considers the process of neurotransmission, especially chemicals used in the brain and elsewhere to carry signals from nerve terminals to the structures they innervate. Focuses on monoamine transmitters (acetylcholine; serotonin; dopamine and norepinephrine); also examines amino acid and peptide transmitters and neuromodulators like adenosine. Macromolecules that mediate neurotransmitter synthesis, release, inactivation, and receptor-mediated actions are discussed, as well as factors that regulate their activity and the second-messenger systems they control.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wurtman, Richard
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Biology
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
08/22/2012
CARE: Confident Action and Referral by Educators - Online Training
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

An online training for school staff to recognize and respond to student emotional and behavioral distress.

Image by lisa runnels from Pixabay

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Base Education
National Center for School Engagement
Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
Date Added:
09/03/2019
Challenging Ideas in Mental Health
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Take a new and different look at mental health. This unit invites you to think differently about life's dilemmas by taking account of the views of all concerned, especially people experiencing mental distress. It explores ideas and practice in mental health, and will appeal to a wide range of people.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Depression in Children and Adolescents
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Depression (major depressive disorder or clinical depression) is a common but serious mood disorder. It causes severe symptoms that affect how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating, or working.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
The National Institute for Mental Health
Author:
The Natiional Institute for Mental Health
Date Added:
10/01/2016
Depression in Older Adults
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
National Center for Biotechnology Information
Author:
Amy Fiske
Julie Loebach Wetherell
Margaret Gatz
Date Added:
04/25/2017
Dreams Are Fun Because They Are Emotional Not Logical
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

During dreams, the logical part of the brain is shut off, this is for one reason: fun. The point of dreams is to relax and have fun, which is why they are directly tied in with your emotions, because emotion equals fun.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Mark Pettinelli
Date Added:
08/19/2015
Dreams Rarely Make Sense Because They Are Usually More Emotional Than Logical
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Dreams are emotional, not logical, and therefore they don’t directly reflect your thoughts and what you actually believe, but an emotional representation of those thoughts. This means that dreams don’t always reflect what you’re thinking, but more likely what you are feeling.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Mark Pettinelli
Date Added:
08/19/2015
Economic History of Financial Crises, Fall 2009
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

" This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008."

Subject:
Business and Communication
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Temin, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2009
G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Vision and Disease, Spring 2007
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

How do we communicate with the outside world? How are our senses of vision, smell, taste and pain controlled at the cellular and molecular levels? What causes medical conditions like allergies, hypertension, depression, obesity and various central nervous system disorders? G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide a major part of the answer to all of these questions. GPCRs constitute the largest family of cell-surface receptors and in humans are encoded by more than 1,000 genes. GPCRs convert extracellular messages into intracellular responses and are involved in essentially all physiological processes. GPCR dysfunction results in numerous human disorders, and over 50% of all prescription drugs on the market today directly or indirectly target GPCRs.In this course, we will discuss GPCR signal transduction pathways, GPCR oligomerization and the diseases caused by GPCR dysfunction. We will study the structure and function of rhodopsin, a dim-light photoreceptor and a well-studied GPCR that converts light into electric impulses sent to the brain and leads to vision. We will also discuss how mutations in rhodopsin cause retinal degeneration and congenital night blindness. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kota, Parvathi
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Happiness, Confidence, Bravery and Courage: Psychological Writings of Mark Pettinelli
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

What is the difference between confidence and bravery? If people are happy when they are confident, what then is the difference between happiness and confidence?

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Mark Pettinelli
Date Added:
02/16/2011
History of Europe, 1800 to the Present
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of Europe from 1800 to present day. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Europe during this period including Industrial Revolution, the First and Second World Wars, imperialism, and the Cold War. By the end of this course, the student will understand how nationalism, industrialization, and imperialism fueled the rise of European nation-states in the nineteenth century, as well as how world war and oppressive regimes devastated Europe during the 1900s. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Think critically and analytically about European history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; Identify and analyze the varying causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution in Europe; Identify, describe, and analyze the development of a coherent set of ideologies in post-Napoleonic Europe: liberalism, socialism, Marxism, nationalism, and Romanticism; Identify and describe the causes and effects of the era of reform and revolution in Europe in the 1820s and 1830s, as well as analyze the Revolutions of 1848; Describe and analyze the effects of urbanizationĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜexpanding cities, rising public health risks, redefined social classes, the evolving nature of the family, and new developments in science and thought; Identify the age of nationalism in Europe between 1850 and 1914. Students will analyze FranceĺÎĺĺÎĺs Second Empire, ItalyĺÎĺĺÎĺs unification, GermanyĺÎĺĺÎĺs unification, and the modernization of Russia. Students will also be able to define the emergence of the modern nation-state during this period; Identify the causes and characteristics of EuropeĺÎĺĺÎĺs ĺÎĺĺĺŤNew ImperialismĄ_ĺĺö of the late nineteenth century. Students will also be able to describe and analyze responses to this imperialism in Africa, India, the Middle East, and the Far East; Assess how and why World War I erupted in 1914. Students will also be able to identify and describe the characteristics and impact of the Great War; Identify and describe the Russian Revolution of 1917, including the fall of the Romanov dynasty and the Bolshevik Revolution; Identify and describe the cultural and social problems that characterized post-WWI Europe. Students will be able to analyze Modernism, ethnic and economic problems in central and eastern Europe, and the Great Depression; Identify and describe the rise of authoritarian regimes in Europe during the 1920s and 1930s. Students will be able to analyze Stalinism, Fascism, and Nazism; Identify and describe the causes and conflicts of World War II. Students will also be able to analyze, identify, and describe the Holocaust; Analyze and explain the Cold War. Students will also be able to analyze, identify, and describe the collapse of Communism and the Soviet Union, as well as the end of the Cold War; Identify and describe the post-WWII social transformations in Europe, including the rise of feminism, the rise of counterculture, and new developments in both science and technology; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, using historical research methods. (History 202)

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
An Introduction to Global Health - Mental Health in a Global Perspective (11:31)
Rating

This lesson discusses and explains why mental health is difficult to define using international terminology. It also introduces why there is a much higher burden of disease linked with mental disorders in Europe compared to, for example, Africa. The session discussed why there is a different spending on mental health treatment in developing countries compared to western countries.
Participants: Dr. Matt Muijen.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
Professor Flemming Konradsen
Date Added:
01/07/2016