Search Resources

8 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Research Writing
Are You Being Formal Enough?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this seminar, you will learn how writers use a formal style of writing when reporting about research. You will also learn about the difference between subjective and objective reporting and how writers must be precise in the research process. The bottom line is writers must know the correct words, the placement of those words, and the appropriate “level” of those words when writing in a research setting.StandardsCC.1.4.9-10.KWrite with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition. • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms of the discipline in which they are writing.CC.1.4.9-10.XWrite routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.CC.1.4.9-10.RDemonstrate a grade-appropriate command of the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Deanna Mayers
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
10/15/2017
Bay College - ENGL 101 - Rhetoric & Composition
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Online OER text adapted for use in ENGL 101 - Rhetoric & Composition by Amber Kinonen, Jennifer McCann, Todd McCann, and Erica Mead for Bay College.

© 2017 Bay College and Content Creators. Except where otherwise noted this work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bay College
Author:
Amber Kinonen
Erica Mead
Jennifer McCann
Todd McCann
Date Added:
03/30/2017
Be Clear, Not Cloudy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

A researcher often reports his or her findings in the form of academic writing. To do so, the researcher must use a particular writing style, being as clear as possible. Unlike other types of writing where adjectives and descriptive phrases are encouraged, research writing emphasizes simple sentences striving always for clarity. In this seminar, you will learn about clear, concise writing and how to choose precise words to say only what needs to be said. StandardsCC.1.4.9-10.KWrite with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition. • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms of the discipline in which they are writing.CC.1.4.9-10.XWrite routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.CC.1.4.9-10.RDemonstrate a grade-appropriate command of the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/15/2017
Problem Based Module: The College Debt Crisis
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this project, you will explore a real-world problem, and then work through a series of steps to analyze that problem, research ways the problem could be solved, then propose a possible solution to that problem. Often, there are no specific right or wrong solutions, but sometimes one particular solution may be better than others. The key is making sure you fully understand the problem, have researched some possible solutions, and have proposed the solution that you can support with information / evidence.Begin by reading the problem statement in Step 1. Take the time to review all the information provided in the statement, including exploring the websites, videos and / or articles that are linked. Then work on steps 2 through 8 to complete this problem-based learning experience.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/15/2017
When Passive Voice Is Preferred
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Without realizing it, we often write in what is called active voice. That simply means someone or something does something in a sentence: “The boy threw the ball to his teammate.” In certain situations, however, the active voice is less preferred and, instead, passive voice is used: “The ball was thrown by the boy to his teammate.” Sound a little clunky? It should. That’s why it is used far less often than the active voice. When researching and writing about research, however, passive voice is the preferred style since it places emphasis on the object, not the person doing the action: “Thirty houses were destroyed by the wildfire.” In that sentence, the focus is on the houses, the victims of the fire. In this seminar, you will become more familiar with active vs. passive voice, and how research writing prefers the latter.StandardsCC.1.4.9-10.KWrite with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition. • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms of the discipline in which they are writing.CC.1.4.9-10.XWrite routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.CC.1.4.9-10.RDemonstrate a grade-appropriate command of the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/15/2017