Updating search results...

Search Resources

15 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Criminal Law
American Government
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
Basics of Criminal Law
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
5.0 stars

This video-course surveys crimes and their punishments under the state and federal justice systems in the United States. We’ll focus on the natures and elements of the most common crimes and criminal law defenses.

This is an introductory level course and no prior knowledge of law or criminal law is required.

We’ll start the course by looking at the reasons for punishing crime and the various states of mind that are necessary to establish criminal culpability. We’ll also look at constitutional limitations on criminal law, including due process and the “cruel and unusual punishment” prohibition. We’ll also look at the sources of criminal law, including state statutes, case law and the Model Penal Code.

In module 2, we’ll look at “inchoate” crimes, which are crimes that are punishable even if the criminal acts contemplated are never carried out or completed. These include conspiracy, attempt, solicitation, facilitation and incitement. We’ll also discuss the after-the-fact crime of obstruction of justice.

In modules 3 and 4, we’ll turn to discussions of specific crimes. In module 3, we’ll look at violent crimes, such as homicide, rape, assault and arson. In module 4, we’ll turn to financial crimes, including theft, robbery, burglary, extortion and forgery.

In our final module, we’ll turn to defenses to criminal charges. We’ll discuss the requirements and limitations to many of these. They include self-defense, defense of others, necessity, duress, consent, insanity, diminished capacity, mistake, infancy and entrapment.

When you complete this course, you should have a broad understanding of crimes and the framework on which our criminal justice system works. This will make more advanced courses, such as white-collar crime and those that discuss complex criminal laws such as securities fraud, easier to understand and apply.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Criminal Law
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This course provides an overview of the history and present-day operation of the criminal justice process in the United States. Students analyze the role, responsibility and authority of each of the components of the system: police, courts, corrections and rehabilitation. They will also explore and examine the underlying principles and values of justice. All course content by Nunotte Zama. Content added to OER Commons by Victoria Vidal

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Victoria Vidal
Date Added:
11/12/2019
Criminal Law
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Criminal Law uses a two-step process to augment learning, called the applied approach. First, after building a strong foundation from scratch, Criminal Law introduces you to crimes and defenses that have been broken down into separate components. It is so much easier to memorize and comprehend the subject matter when it is simplified this way. However, becoming proficient in the law takes more than just memorization. You must be trained to take the laws you have studied and apply them to various fact patterns. Most students are expected to do this automatically, but application must be seen, experienced, and practiced before it comes naturally. Thus the second step of the applied approach is reviewing examples of the application of law to facts after dissecting and analyzing each legal concept. Some of the examples come from cases, and some are purely fictional. All the examples are memorable, even quirky, so they will stick in your mind and be available when you need them the most (like during an exam). After a few chapters, you will notice that you no longer obsess over an explanation that doesn’t completely make sense the first time you read it—you will just skip to the example. The examples clarify the principles for you, lightening the workload significantly.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing
Author:
Lisa Storm
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Criminal Law
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This course provides an in-depth review of substantive criminal law in the federal & state systems including analysis of the essential elements of all major crimes, the concepts of constitutional review & judicial scrutiny & the principles governing legal challenges to the constitutionality of laws. It includes legal research & writing & analysis of case and statutory law.

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Roxbury Community College
Author:
Sara Horatius
Date Added:
05/15/2019
Criminal Sentencing and Appeals
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
5.0 stars

This course focuses on the post-verdict phase in criminal cases from sentencing through appeals. This is an introductory level course in criminal procedure, and no prior knowledge or experience is required.

Our first module presents a survey on the different types of sentences, including plea-bargains, diversion, fines, probation, community service, house arrest and incarceration. We will also look at sentencing structure, including discussions of concurrent and consecutive sentencing, split sentences and suspended sentences.

We will then turn to sentencing procedure. Module 2 looks at the sentencing hearing and the statements by various parties, including the prosecution, defense counsel, the defendant, witnesses and victims. We’ll also look at the pre-sentence report and the role it plays in many sentencing procedures. We’ll also discuss the roles of victim impact statements and when and for what they are appropriate.

Module 3 covers the statutory bases for sentencing. We’ll look at statutory sentences, including prescribed minimums, maximums and the landscape of the judge’s discretion in sentencing. We’ll also focus on the role and mechanics of the federal sentencing guidelines.

In Modules 4 and 5, we’ll turn to appeals. Module 4 covers the right to appeal, types of appellate review and the applicable standards of review. We’ll look at de novo, abuse of discretion and review for “clear error.” We’ll also cover the types of errors that can or must lead to reversal and the “plain error” rule. We’ll also look at habeas corpus. While not direct appeals, habeas petitions present collateral bases for appeal.

In Module 5, we’ll look at appellate procedure. We’ll cover the final judgment rule and when interlocutory appeals are allowed. We’ll also discuss when, where and how appeals must be filed. We’ll cover the procedures of writing briefs, conducting oral arguments and the issuance of appellate decisions. Finally, we’ll outline the possible results of appellate proceedings.

By completing this course, you should acquire a better understanding of the processes that follow criminal convictions in the criminal justice system. We hope that you will take advantage, as well, of our other criminal law and procedure courses.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
General Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Cybersecurity-Cybercrime-The Legal Environment
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This presentation covers the legal environment of cybercrime to date. It addresses: the challenges of law enforcement; federal government vs. state jurisdiction of cybercrime; law enforcement department and agencies which handle cybercrime; criminal statutes and privacy statutes.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Law
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Hostos Community College
Author:
Amy J Ramson
Date Added:
07/04/2020
Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

These rules govern the conduct of all criminal proceedings brought in Federal courts. Our Federal Rules ebooks include: The complete rules as of December 1, 2012 (for the 2013 edition); All notes of the Advisory Committee following each rule; Internal links to rules referenced within the rules; and external links to the LII website's version of the US Code.

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
The Center for Computer Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI)
Provider Set:
The eLangdell Bookstore
Date Added:
12/01/2012
Introduction to Law
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This course covers the structure and function of the American legal system. Major areas of substantive law are introduced to students. An overview of both civil and criminal procedure is also provided. Legal vocabulary and the process of legal analysis are emphasized.

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Roxbury Community College
Author:
Sara Horatius
Date Added:
05/15/2019
Syllabus for Issues in Law Enforcement: Cybersecurity and Public Interest Technology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This is a syllabus for a course in Issues in Law Enforcement, a criminal justice course. The curriculum is a public interest technology course in cybersecurity. Principally, the federal government handles cybersecurity investigations along with some state governments and the FBI acts as the center for all cybersecurity complaints.

The course expands beyond law enforcement and provides a comprehensive background to the field through the following presentations: a history of cybersecurity; an explanation of the Internet; an introduction to cybercrime and cybersecurity techniques; the legal environment, which includes a survey of law enforcement and prosecution departments and agencies, and federal and NY state criminal, civil and privacy laws; a case (Silk Road Market) about a darknet market which demonstrates federal law enforcement in action; and the concept that cybersecurity is an enormous challenge to law enforcement.

The course provides two types of student activities:

(i) Service learning project in which students present about how to prevent yourself from being hacked; and

(ii) Group assignments in which students choose and analyze four types of current cybersecurity cases as a team by answering questions posed by the professor which is presented to the class as a whole.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Hostos Community College
Author:
Amy J Ramson
Date Added:
07/12/2020
Trayvon Martin case  reignites gun law debate
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

The shooting death in Sanford, Florida, of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin at the hands of 28-year-old George Zimmerman in February 2012 has touched off debate on many issues, including the role of race in both the shooting and the subsequent investigation by the Sanford Police department.

This exercise consists of two student readings. The first reading examines the debate surrounding Florida's "Stand Your Ground" law. What is the "Stand Your Ground" law? What do supporters and critics have to say about it? What effect has it had? The second reading takes a wider look at the gun control debate. Should stronger gun control laws be passed? Questions for student discussion follow each reading.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Political Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Mark Engler
Date Added:
06/28/2012
Zimmerman Trial: The Role of Race
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In small groups and in a fishbowl discussion, students consider how race affected the trial of George Zimmerman for the murder of Trayvon Martin.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Marieke van Woerkom
Date Added:
08/01/2013