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Geometry and Geocaching Using GIS & GPS
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No Strings Attached
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Students take on the role of geographers and civil engineers and use a device enabled with the global positioning system (GPS) to locate geocache locations via a number of waypoints. Teams save their data points, upload them to geographic information systems (GIS) software, such as Google Earth, and create scale drawings of their explorations while solving problems of area, perimeter and rates. The activity is unique in its integration of technology for solving mathematical problems and asks students to relate GPS and GIS to engineering.

Subject:
Engineering
Geometry
Measurement and Data
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
Activities
Author:
Andrea Burrows
Jake Schell
Date Added:
10/05/2018
Here Comes the Hurricane! Saving Lives through Logical Reasoning and Computer Science
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Students use a hurricane tracking map to measure the distance from a specific latitude and longitude location of the eye of a hurricane to a city. Then they use the map's scale factor to convert the distance to miles. They also apply the distance formula by creating an x-y coordinate plane on the map. Students are challenged to analyze what data might be used by computer science engineers to write code that generates hurricane tracking models. Then students analyze a MATLAB® computer code that uses the distance formula repetitively to generate a table of data that tracks a hurricane at specific time intervals. Students come to realize that using a computer program to generate the calculations (instead of by hand) is very advantageous for a dynamic situation like tracking storm movements. Their inspection of some MATLAB code helps them understand how it communicates what to do using mathematical formulas, logical instructions and repeated tasks. They also conclude that the example program is too simplistic to really be a useful tool; useful computer model tools must necessarily be much more complex.

Subject:
Engineering
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Armando Vital
Fritz Claydon
Justin Chang
K. B. Nakshatrala
Rodrigues
Stuart Long
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Remix
How can classrooms be redesigned to better accommodate technology and student needs?
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Throughout this problem-based learning module students will address real world skills. Students will be asked to brainstorm ideas and think innovatively both independently and collaboratively in addressing a real-world problem that is relevant to their daily lives and surroundings.  Students/teams will be encouraged to use the internet for research purposes in their design phase. What components should be included for a modern, updated classroom? Students will utilize various online platforms to design an ideal, modern, contemporary “dream classroom”.  Students will incorporate components that would meet the needs of all learners and a classroom that would be able to integrate technology. These classrooms can be shared with relevant individuals in the community and others in the school building.

Subject:
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Martin Ruthaivilavan
How can classrooms be redesigned to better accommodate technology and student needs?
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Throughout this problem-based learning module students will address real world skills. Students will be asked to brainstorm ideas and think innovatively both independently and collaboratively in addressing a real-world problem that is relevant to their daily lives and surroundings.  Students/teams will be encouraged to use the internet for research purposes in their design phase. What components should be included for a modern, updated classroom? Students will utilize various online platforms to design an ideal, modern, 21st century “dream classroom”.  Students will incorporate components that would meet the needs of all learners and a classroom that would be able to integrate technology. These classrooms can be shared with relevant individuals in the community and others in the school building.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Introduction to Geodesy and Mapping
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This lesson covers the topics of geodesy, datums, map projections, and map coordinate systems. Geodesy addresses the shape of the earth: the topographic surface, geoid, and best-fit ellipsoid. Datums addresses the position and orientation or the best-fit ellipsoid and the resulting coordinates. Map projections addresses the different ways to project an ellipsoidal datum onto a flat surface. Each projection has unique properties and each has pros and cons. Coordinate systems addresses the different ways that a rectangular coordinate system can be superposed on latitude-longitude graticule.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
COMET MetEd Collection
Author:
COMET
Date Added:
04/23/2015
Scale Model Project
Conditions of Use:
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Students build scale models of objects of their choice. In class they measure the original object and pick a scale, deciding either to scale it up or scale it down. Then they create the models at home. Students give two presentations along the way, one after their calculations are done, and another after the models are completed. They learn how engineers use scale models in their designs of structures, products and systems. Two student worksheets as well as rubrics for project and presentation expectations and grading are provided.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Aaron Lamplugh
Maia Vadeen
Malinda Zarske
Nathan Coyle
Russell Anderson
Ryan Sullivan
Date Added:
02/07/2017
Volumes of Complex Solids
Conditions of Use:
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Challenged with a hypothetical engineering work situation in which they need to figure out the volume and surface area of a nuclear power plant’s cooling tower (a hyperbolic shape), students learn to calculate the volume of complex solids that can be classified as solids of revolution or solids with known cross sections. These objects of complex shape defy standard procedures to compute volumes. Even calculus techniques depend on the ability to perform multiple measurements of the objects or find functional descriptions of their edges. During both guided and independent practice, students use (free GeoGebra) geometry software, a photograph of the object, a known dimension of it, a spreadsheet application and integral calculus techniques to calculate the volume of complex shape solids within a margin of error of less than 5%—an approach that can be used to compute the volumes of big or small objects. This activity is suitable for the end of the second semester of AP Calculus classes, serving as a major grade for the last six-week period, with students’ project results presentation grades used as the second semester final test.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Mathematics
Geometry
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Miguel R. Ramire
Date Added:
02/07/2017