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The Bear Who Wouldn't Sleep
Conditions of Use:
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Intermediate-level ESL students will apply facts from a content-based reading passage to create a short story about a bear who doesn't hibernate with his family.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Donna Kauffman
Date Added:
05/22/2001
Cengage OpenNow English Composition I Reading & Learning Objectives
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Students learn the writing process and prewriting, grammar for parts of speech, punctuation and sentences, preparing to write, the first draft, revising, editing, and proofreading, narrative, comparison/contrast, and argumentative modes, and reading and research. Content is available in PDF and Open Document formats and is licensed CC BY. Learning Objectives also are provided. Full course offering available at https://www.cengage.com/c/opennow-english-composition-1e-opennow-cengage

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Reading
Textbook
Unit of Study
Author:
OpenNow from Cengage
Date Added:
09/14/2018
Editing and Revision with Acronyms
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This is a compilation of engaging Educational YouTube Videos. The videos have been selected from a number of creative authors who share and instruct the techniques they use in regards to the revision and editing portion of the writing process. They have been placed together and arranged with the purpose of differentiating the instruction of students on a variety of levels within a regular or special education setting.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Jill Danielski
Date Added:
07/25/2017
English Composition I
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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This course promotes clear and effective communication by sharpening critical thinking and writing skills. The first unit is designed to change the way in which students think about writing--as a conversation rather than a solitary act. The second unit focuses on academic writing and explores the PWR-Writing or Power-Writing Method (PWR Pre-Write, Write, Revise). The remaining units will focus on the minutiae of good writing practices, from style to citation methodology. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Demonstrate mastery of principles of grammar, usage, mechanics, and sentence structure. Identify the thesis in another individual's essay. Develop a thesis statement, structure it in an introductory paragraph, and support it with the body of the essay. Organize ideas logically within an essay, deploying adequate transitional devices to ensure coherence, flow, and focus. Differentiate between rhetorical strategies and write with an awareness of rhetorical technique and audience. Differentiate between tones and write with an awareness of how tone affects the audience's experience. Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking for reading and writing purposes. Quote, paraphrase, and document the work of others. Write sentences that vary in length and structure. (English 001)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011
Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media, Spring 2001
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. To this end, we'll think about writing as an act of self-discovery, as an act of critical thinking, and as an act of communicating with an audience. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Walsh, Andrea S.
Date Added:
01/01/2001
Expository Writing: Autobiography - Theory and Practice, Spring 2001
Conditions of Use:
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Subject focused on forms of exposition, including narration, critique, argument, and persuasion. Frequent writing assignments, regular revisions, and short oral presentations are required. Readings and specific writing assignments vary by section. See subject's URL for enhanced section descriptions. Emphasis is on developing students' ability to write clear and effective prose. Students can expect to write frequently, to give and receive response to work in progress, to improve their writing by revising, to read the work of accomplished writers, and to participate actively in class discussions and workshops. Focus: What can we believe when we read an autobiography? How do writers recall, select, shape, and present their lives to construct life stories? Readings that ground these questions include selections from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Linda Brent (pseudonym for Harriet Jacobs), "A Sketch of the Past" by Virginia Woolf, Notes of A Native Son by James Baldwin, "The Achievement of Desire" by Richard Rodriguez, The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston, and "Our Secret" by Susan Griffin. Discussion, papers, and brief oral presentations will focus on the content of the life stories as well as the forms and techniques authors use to shape autobiography. We will identify masks and stances used to achieve various goals, sources and interrelationships of technical and thematic concerns, and "fictions" of autobiographical writing. Assignments will allow students to consider texts in terms of their implicit theories of autobiography, of theories we read, and of students' experiences; assignments also allow some autobiographical writing.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fox, Elizabeth
Date Added:
01/01/2001
Pace and Structure in Lesson Planning
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Instructional expert Jim Knight visits first year middle school teacher Aisha Santos to discuss pacing and structure of her lessons.

Subject:
Education
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Author:
Aisha Santos
Jim Knight
Date Added:
11/02/2012
Quiz W.5: My Weekend
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A short quiz on CCSS.W.9-10.5. This quiz uses errors common in African American Vernacular English in inner-city Detroit 2013. The types of errors were taken from student examples. There are 36 major errors that students should identify.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Terrence Reilly Jr.
Date Added:
01/28/2016