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As Big as the Ocean: Creating Murals
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This article discusses how to use murals as an interdisciplinary, cooperative activity to blend science, art, and math concepts.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
Jessica Fries-Gaither
Date Added:
10/17/2014
Astronomy Star Project
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This is a project I assign my students in an introductory, non-science major astronomy class. Each student is assigned one of the 25 brightest stars in the sky and they are asked to research and apply concepts they have been learning in the class to their particular star. I leave it up to them to decide the format of their final project - most do PowerPoint but some have done videos or podcasts. One student actually landed a part time job at a radio station after they heard her recording her star project! Many students tell me this is a highlight of the course!

Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Erik Christensen
Date Added:
01/28/2016
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Author Study
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    During this lesson, students will learn more about their favorite authors by researching them on the Internet and presenting to the class, school, and community. Students will learn biographical information about their authors, the inspiration behind their stories and identify their authors’ different styles of writing.   

Subject:
Elementary Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Shelby Fischman
Date Added:
07/23/2020
Author Study
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    During this lesson, students will learn more about their favorite authors by researching them on the Internet and presenting to the class, school, and community. Students will learn biographical information about their authors, the inspiration behind their stories and identify their authors’ different styles of writing.   

Subject:
Elementary Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Etu
Date Added:
03/12/2018
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Biography Research
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    During this lesson, students will learn more about a historical person by researching on the Internet and presenting to the class. Students will learn biographical information about their person.  Students will compile their research together in a class book. 

Subject:
Elementary Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Carmen Shannon
Date Added:
05/11/2019
CORRE: An evaluation framework for transforming teaching materials into OERs
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A presentation covering the development of an evaluation framework for transforming teaching materials into OERs.

Delivered at the OER 10 Conference

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Higher Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University College Falmouth
Provider Set:
UCF openSpace
Author:
CORRE
Date Added:
07/21/2011
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.15: Project - Make a Recommendation
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To conclude this unit, students design a recommendation engine based on data that they collect and analyze from their classmates. After looking at an example of a recommendation app, students follow a project guide to complete this multi-day activity. In the first several steps, students choose what choice they want to help the user to make, what data they need to give the recommendation, create a survey, and collect information about their classmates' choices. They then interpret the data and use what they have learned to create the recommendation algorithm. Last, they use their algorithms to make recommendations to a few classmates. Students perform a peer review and make any necessary updates to their projects before preparing a presentation to the class.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.8: Create a Representation
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In this lesson students design a structure to represent their perfect day using the binary representation systems they've learned in this chapter. Students will first write a short description of their perfect day and then review with a partner to identify the key pieces of information they think a computer could capture. As a class students will decide how a punch card of bytes of information will be interpreted to represent those pieces of information. Students will then use the ASCII, binary number, and image formats they have learned to represent their perfect days. Students then trade punch cards and try to decode what the other student's perfect day is like. The lesson ends with a reflection.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.14: Project - Interactive Card
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In this cumulative project for Chapter 1, students plan for and develop an interactive greeting card using all of the programming techniques they've learned to this point.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.22: Project - Design a Game
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Students will plan and build their own game using the project guide from the previous two lessons to guide their project. Working individually or in pairs, students will first decide on the type of game they'd like to build, taking as inspiration a set of sample games. They will then complete a blank project guide where they will describe the game's behavior and scope out the variables, sprites, and functions they'll need to build. In Code Studio, a series of levels prompts them on a general sequence they can use to implement this plan. Partway through the process, students will share their projects for peer review and will incorporate feedback as they finish their game. At the end of the lesson, students will share their completed games with their classmates. This project will span multiple classes and can easily take anywhere from 3-5 class periods.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.16: Project - Prototype an Innovation
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In this final project for the course, students team to develop and test a prototype for an innovative computing device based on the Circuit Playground. Using the inputs and outputs available on the board, groups will create programs that allow for interesting and unique user interactions.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Problem Solving Lesson 1.8: Project - Propose an App
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To conclude their study of the problem solving process and the input/output/store/process model of a computer, students will propose an app designed to solve a real world problem. This project will be completed across multiple days and will result in students creating a poster highlighting the features of their app that they will present to their classmates. A project guide provides step by step instructions for students and helps them organize their thoughts. The project is designed to be completed in pairs though it can be completed individually.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: The Design Process Lesson 4.16: Project - App Presentation
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At this point teams have researched a topic of personal and social importance, developed and tested both a paper prototype and a digital prototype, and iterated on the initial app to incorporate new features and bug fixes. Now is the time for them to review what they have done and pull together a coherent presentation to demonstrate their process of creation. Using the provided presentation template, teams prepare to present about their process of app development, including the problem they set out to solve, the ways in which they've incorporated feedback from testing, and their plans for the future.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: The Design Process Lesson 4.7: Project - Paper Prototype
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Based on the peer interview from the previous lesson, each student comes up with an idea for an app that will address their user's problem. Students then get to create their own paper prototype of their app ideas by drawing "screens" on individual notecards. A project guide directs students through the process including building the app and testing it with their user to see if their assumptions about the user interfaces they created are accurate.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Web Development Lesson 2.14: Project - Final Personal Website
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Students have spent a lot of time throughout the unit working on their Personal Website. In the final couple of days students finalize their websites. They work with peers to get feedback, put the finishing touches on the websites, review the rubric and reflect on their process. To cap off the unit, they will share their projects and also a overview of the process they took to get to that final design.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Web Development Lesson 2.9: Project - Multi-Page Websites
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After learning about how to link web pages to one another, students are finally able to publish the website they have been working on. In this lesson, they link together all the previous pages they have created into one project, create a new page, and add navigation between the pages before publishing the entire site to the Web.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 1.14: Practice PT - The Internet and Society
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This lesson is a capstone to the Internet unit. Students will research and prepare a flash talk about an issue facing society: either **[v Net Neutrality]** or **Internet Censorship**. Developing an informed opinion about these issues hinges on an understanding of how the Internet functions as a system. Students will prepare and deliver a flash talk that should combine forming an opinion about the issue and an exhibition of their knowledge of the internet.

This lesson is good *practice* for certain elements of the AP Explore Performance Task.1 The primary things practiced here are: doing a bit of research about impacts of computing (though here it’s specifically about the Internet), explaining some technical details related to ideas in computer science, and connecting these ideas to global and social impacts. Students will practice synthesizing information, and presenting their learning in a flash talk.

1**Note:** This is NOT the official AP® Performance Task that will be submitted as part of the Advanced Placement exam; it is a practice activity intended to prepare students for some portions of their individual performance at a later time.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 2.6: Rapid Research - Format Showdown
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In this lesson students will conduct a small amount of research to explore a file format either currently in use or from history. Students will conduct research in order to complete a "one-pager" that summarizes their findings. They will also design a computational artifact (video, audio, graphic, etc.) that succinctly summarizes the advantages of their format over other similar ones.

This lesson is intended to be a quick, short version of a performance task in which students rapidly do some research and respond in writing. It might take 2 class days but should not take more. The goal is to develop skills that students will use when they complete the actual Explore PT later in the year.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 3.10: Practice PT - Design a Digital Scene
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To conclude their introduction to programming, students will design a program that draws a digital scene of their choosing. Students will be working in groups of 3 or 4 and will begin by identifying a scene they wish to create. They will then use Top-Down Design to identify the high-level functions necessary to create that image. The group will then assign these components to individual members of the group to program. After programming their individual portion, students will combine all of their code to compose the whole scene. The project concludes with reflection questions similar to those students will see on the AP® Performance Tasks.

Note: This is NOT the official AP Performance Task that will be submitted as part of the Advanced Placement exam; it is a practice activity intended to prepare students for some portions of their individual performance at a later time.

AP® is a trademark registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this curriculum.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 4.1: Rapid Research - Cybercrime
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Students learn about various types of cybercrimes and the cybersecurity measures that can help prevent them. Then students perform a Rapid Research project investigating a particular cybercrime event with a particular focus on the data that was lost or stolen and the concerns that arise as a result. The Rapid Research activity features vocabulary, concepts, and skills that should help prepare them for the AP Explore PT, and also serves as a capstone for the sequence of lessons on encryption and security.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 4.4: Rapid Research - Data Innovations
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In this lesson students will conduct a small amount of research to explore a computing innovation that leverages the use of data. Students will research a topic of personal interest and respond to questions about about how that innovation produces, uses, or consumes data. The lesson is intended to give students practice with doing research of this nature and provides a small amount of scaffolding to help students figure out what to look for.

This lesson is intended to be a quick, short version of a performance task in which students rapidly do some research and respond in writing. It might take 2 class days but should not take more. The goal is to generate ideas for exploration later when students complete the actual Explore PT later in the year.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 5.10: Building an App: Color Sleuth
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This lesson attempts to walk students through the iterative development process of building an app (basically) from scratch that involves the use of `if` statements. Following an imaginary conversation between two characters - Alexis and Michael - students follow the problem solving and program design decisions they make for each step of constructing the app. Along the way they decide when and how to break things down into functions, and of course discuss the logic necessary to make a simple game.

The last step - writing code that executes an end-of-game condition - students must do on their own. How they decide to use `if` statements to end the game will require some creativity. The suggested condition - first to score 10 points - is subtly tricky and can be written many different ways.

At the conclusion of the lesson there are three practice Create PT-style questions as well as resources explaining the connection between this lesson and the actual Create PT. Depending on how you use these materials they can easily add an additional day to this lesson.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 5.14: Building an App: Image Scroller
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Students will extend the **My Favorite Things** app they built in the previous lesson so that it now manages and displays a collection of images and responds to key events. Students are introduced to the practice of refactoring code in order to keep programs consistent and remove redundancies when adding new functionality. As part of learning to use key events, students are shown that event handlers pass a parameter which contains additional information about the event. This lesson also serves as further practice at using arrays in programs.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 5.17: Building an App: Canvas Painter
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Students continue to practice working with arrays and are introduced to a new user interface element, the canvas. The canvas includes commands for drawing simple geometric shapes (circles, rectangles, lines) and also triggers mouse and key events like any other user interface element. Over the course of the lesson, students combine these features to make an app that allows a user to draw an image while recording every dot drawn on the canvas in an array. By processing this array in different ways, the app will allow students to redraw their image in different styles, like random, spray paint, and sketching. Along the way, students use their knowledge of functions with return values to make code which is easy to manage and reuse.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 5.3: Building an App: Multi-Screen App
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This lesson gives students time to familiarize themselves with the process of making event-driven apps before we move on to deeper content. They will design and create a (minimum) 4-screen app on a topic of their choosing. There are some other constraints on the project to help guide students in their thinking. Students are also encouraged to do independent work, but alongside a "coding buddy" or "thought partner" to be a help along the way.

**Note:** This activity **is not intended to be a Practice PT** but could be used similarly. The aim is to give an opportunity to get comfortable with Design Mode and the structure of event-driven programming in a creative way. Another goal is to intentionally build in an environment of informal collaboration, even when doing individual work. Suggestions for containing the scope of the project and amount of time allocated to it can be found in the lesson plan.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 5.5: Building an App: Clicker Game
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In this lesson, students add variables to two different exemplar apps to keep track of a score, or a count of some number of button clicks. The major topic is **variable scope** and understanding the differences, benefits, and drawbacks, of using global versus local variables. This lesson focuses more on using global variables, since in event-driven apps that’s what you need to keep track of data across multiple events.

The very basics of a **simple if statement** are also presented in this lesson, mostly to highlight the difference between the = and == operators. Finally, students are asked to apply what they’ve learned about variables, scope, and if statements, to make their own “clicker” game modeled after one of the exemplars they saw during the lesson.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 6.3: Explore PT - Complete the Task (8 hours)
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It is finally time for students to take on the Explore Performance Task. For a minimum of 8 class hours, students should work on their projects with only types of teacher support allowed (essentially: Advise on process, don’t influence or evaluate ideas).

The lesson includes reminders about how you can interact with students while they are working on their projects, and suggestions about time line. The Explore PT requires a minimum of 8 hours of class time. At the end, students will submit their computational artifact and written responses through their AP digital portfolio.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 7.3: Create PT - Complete the Task (12 hrs)
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It is finally time for students to take on the Create Performance Task. For a total of 12 class hours, students should work on their projects with only types of teacher support allowed (essentially: Advise on process, don’t influence or evaluate ideas). Students may also work with a collaborative partner in *in development of their program* - written responses must be done on their own.

The lesson includes reminders about how you can interact with students while they are working on their projects, and suggestions about time line. The Create PT requires a minimum of 12 hours of class time. At the end, students will submit their program code, program video, and written responses through their AP digital portfolio.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Principles 2019-2020 8.7: Tell a Data Story
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For this Practice PT students will analyze the data that they have been collecting as a class in order to demonstrate their ability to discover, visualize, and present a trend or pattern they find in the data. Leading up to this lesson, students will have been working in pairs to clean and summarize their data. Students should complete this project individually but can get feedback on their ideas from their data-cleaning partner.

**Note**: This is NOT the official AP® Performance Task that will be submitted as part of the Advanced Placement exam; it is a practice activity intended to prepare students for some portions of their individual performance at a later time.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Principles 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
Citizen Science with Zooniverse
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Students learn that ordinary citizens, including students like themselves, can make meaningful contributions to science through the concept of "citizen science." First, students learn some examples of ongoing citizen science projects that are common around the world, such as medical research, medication testing and donating idle computer time to perform scientific calculations. Then they explore Zooniverse, an interactive website that shows how research in areas from marine biology to astronomy leverage the power of the Internet to use the assistance of non-scientists to classify large amounts of data that is unclassifiable by machines for various reasons. To conclude, student groups act as engineering teams to brainstorm projects ideas for their own town that could benefit from community help, then design conceptual interactive websites that could organize and support the projects.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Jennifer Nider
Lori Rice
Paul Cain
Sujatha Prakash
Yasche Glass
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Data Use in an Undergraduate Remote Sensing Course
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This activity requires students to process, interpret and integrate a wide variety of remote sensing and other data as they investigate a complex, open-ended research question. It is hands-on, collaborative, and manageable for a variety of class sizes. The problem addressed has geological, hydrological, biological and political implications, and is thus of interest to a wide array of undergraduates.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Author Profile
Eric B. Grosfils
Date Added:
12/12/2018
Design Thinking Crash Course (3rd - 12th Grade) Adaptable Lesson Plan Outline
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This is a highly adaptable outline for how design thinking could be introduced to your learners over a multi-day project. This plan works best if students are divided up into groups of 3-4 for all work except the introduction to each concept at the beginning of class. Learners should stay in the same group for the whole class.

Includes pre-work links, general instructions to guide planning for each day, design thinking student handouts, and multi-grade NGSS standards linked to design thinking.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/13/2020
Fun Experiments, Cool Facts, Online Games, Activities, Projects, Ideas, Technology
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Learn more about the amazing world of science by enjoying our fun science experiments, cool facts, online games, free activities, ideas, lesson plans, photos, quizzes, videos & science fair projects.
Science is a fascinating subject, there are many great ideas that will help you make a great science fair project.
Find science games, experiments, facts, projects, videos, quizzes, lessons and images related to the topic of your choice.
Put on your safety glasses & lab coat and get to work on a fun science fair project.
Here's a few of our ideas for science fair projects.

Subject:
Life Science
Physical Science
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Game
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
06/12/2017
Glowing Pokémon Go Patches with EL Panels
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Students combine art, gaming culture and engineering by fabricating light-up patches to increase youngsters’ visibility at night. The open-ended project is presented as a hypothetical design challenge: Students are engineers who have been asked by a group of parents whose children go out Pokémon hunting at night to create glowing patches that they adhere to clothing or backpacks to help vehicle drivers see the kids in the dark. Student pairs create Pokémon character stencil designs cut from iron-on fabric patches, adding transparent layers for color. Placed over an EL (electroluminescent) panel that is connected to a battery pack, the stencils create glowing designs. Each team creates a circuit, which includes lengthening the EL panel wiring to make it easier to wear. Then they sew/adhere the patches onto hoodies, messenger bags, hats, pockets or other applications they dream up. The project concludes with team presentations as if to an audience of project clients. Keep the project simple by hand cutting and ironing/sewing, or use cutting machines, laser cutters and sewing machines, if available.

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
Activities
Author:
Angela Sheehan
Kent Kurashima
Date Added:
05/30/2018
Great Gatsby Relevant Themes
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Driving question:What is the most irrelevant theme to today's modern society from The Great Gatsby?Purpose:1. Students to think critically and analytically.2. Students to gain a more in-depth understanding of how to find themes within texts and be able to have a deeper connection with modern society. Standards: 1) 9-10. RL. 2.2: Analyze in detail the development of two or more themes or central ideas over the course of a work of literature, including how they emerge and are shaped and refined by specific details.2) 9-10.RN.4.3: Analyze seminal U.S. and world documents of historical and literacy significance, including how they address related themes and concepts. Grabbers: To show clips from the movie to highlight themes that will be assigned to students. These clips can be used as evidence for the students projects (video clips are in teacher materials tab).https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKs6tUxVC7M - Morals and American Dreamhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqA1ISMJJQY - Society and Class or Moralshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyZrLD_fDLY - materialism and Gender Roleshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yH7eRHHVGGA - materialismhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTWumSE8GXM - moralityhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCxbZ8D7N1o - gender rolesLesson Summary:After the class has read the Great Gatsby, Groups of five will be assigned one main theme from the reading and they will have to support why they think their theme is the most relevant in today’s modern society. They will find sub arguments within the text in order to support this claim and present this information through a digital presentation. Students will also be required to use direct references and quotes to defend their answer. Groups should split up the work evenly and work collaboratively. Students will present their digital presentations to the class. Students will then have a debate taking the persuasive stance on why they think their theme is the most relevant and support it through evidence from their research. After the digital presentations are turned in, presented, and each student is informed by other group's theme in detail by the presentation and challanged by debate, students will write an individual reflection on what theme they personally think is the most relevant in today's society.Lesson Narrative:Introduction: Remind students of presentation expecptations and focuses on the central question asked - What is the most irrelevant theme to today’s modern society from The Great Gatsby?Presentations: Students representing groups that support the six themes from the book, (morality, American dream, society, class, materialism, and gender roles) give presentations that are informative, descriptive, and supported with evidence from the book and other outside sources to the class. Instructor: Asks leading questions during presentations to allow students to go more in depth on their theme. Addresses any questions or misinterpretations that occurred during the presentations. Debate: Each group will then be challenged by the other students of different themes and should argue why their theme is the most relevant in today's society. Each group should respectfully address one another and challenge each others ideas and to support their own with their evidence from their presentations. Each group should work together in order to work towards the goal of being the most relevant by collaboration.Instructor: The instructor uses questions to clarify factual claims, ask for supporting evidence, include other members within the class in the debate, and connect the presentations to the discussion to broaden the understanding of each theme/side to the book and it's relevance.Debriefing: The instructor again asks the driving question. Clarifies any confusion, questions, or misinterpretations raised during the debate. Then summarizes what happened during the debate and lets the class think about other group's stance on their themes. Culminating Activity:1. Provide closure for major driving question.2. Gives the opportunity for students to be persuasive and show their understanding of the lesson. Lesson SummaryAfter researching, presenting, and discussing the central driving question mentioned before, students should be able to write an individual essay based off of previous experience with the project. The individual essay will require the students to reflect on their understanding and take from their personal opinion on what they think the most relevant issue in The Great Gatsby to today's modern society. Example of Culminating ActivityA Persuasive EssayAnswer the following question as an individual reflection from the previous lesson: What is your personal opinion on what theme from the Great Gatsby is the most relevant in today's society? Now that you have researched, presented, and discussed extensively the main 6 themes from the Great Gatsby: morality, American dream, society, class, materialism, and gender roles, pick ONE of these themes and have sub-arguments, evidence, and quotes to support your opinion. This paper should be at least 5 paragraphs long, see guidelines below. The paper should be in MLA format and cited correctly. No direct quotes should be longer than three lines. Paragraph 1: Introduction - short summary of the book, thesis Paragraph 2: Sub-argument with evidence from book, movie, class presentations, debate, and other outside sources to support this argument. Paragraph 3: Sub-argument with evidence from book, movie, class presentations, debate, and other outside sources to support this argument.Paragraph 4: Sub-argument with evidence from book, movie, class presentations, debate, and other outside sources to support this argument. Paragraph 5: Conclusion - Wrap up thoughts, restate thesis 

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Quynn Hickey
Hannah Hogenkamp
Sammi Shapiro
Date Added:
10/05/2016
Group Presentation on Succeeding in Graduate School
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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This group project is designed for international students to research into topics related to the theme of success in graduate school and give a presentation to their classmates on their topic, preferably teaching the class on that topic but also engaging the class in the lesson. Students will also listen intently as their classmates present and critique some presentations formally. The instructor usually offers the students a variety of topics but groups can propose other topics to the instructor for his/her approval. Created by Steven Harris-Scott, Ph.D., and Amy Lewis, Ed.D., for INTO George Mason University with support from Mason 4-VA. Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

Subject:
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Steven Harris-Scott
Date Added:
09/20/2017
Remix
Honey Be
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This lesson will help adult learners to identify honey bees, identify different types of honey bees in a hive, describe pollination process, interpret the importance of pollination and honey bees for pollination and gain knowledge about beekeeping. This will provide a business idea for them to pursue at the same type help conserve honey bee populations. In the long run this will help make food production sustainable. Several online and paper resources are available in this lesson. The mobile-based activities will enhance the learning experience. It will enable learners to access materials and recall and also perform an interesting assignment by taking photos. Only free mobile tools like Wix.com and Whatsapp are used.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Shamila Janakiraman
Date Added:
08/08/2019