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  • WY.SCI.MS.ESS1.1
Gravity and Orbits
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Move the sun, earth, moon and space station to see how it affects their gravitational forces and orbital paths. Visualize the sizes and distances between different heavenly bodies, and turn off gravity to see what would happen without it!

Subject:
Astronomy
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Emily Moore
John Blanco
Jon Olson
Kathy Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
02/07/2011
Gravity and Orbits (AR)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Move the sun, earth, moon and space station to see how it affects their gravitational forces and orbital paths. Visualize the sizes and distances between different heavenly bodies, and turn off gravity to see what would happen without it!

Subject:
Astronomy
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Emily Moore
John Blanco
Jon Olson
Kathy Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Patricia Loblein
Sam Reid
Date Added:
02/07/2011
Lunar Learning
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Why does the Moon not always look the same to us? Sometimes it is a big, bright, circle, but, other times, it is only a tiny sliver, if we can see it at all. The different shapes and sizes of the slivers of the Moon are referred to as its phases, and they change periodically over the course of a lunar month, which is twenty-eight days long. The phases are caused by the relative positions of the Earth, Sun, and Moon at different times during the month.

Subject:
Engineering
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Catie Liken
Teresa Tetlow
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Lunar Lollipops
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students work in teams of two to discover the relative positions of the Earth, Sun and Moon that produce the different phases of the Moon. Groups are each given a Styrofoam ball that they attach to a pencil so that it looks like a lollipop. In this acting-out model exercise, this ball on a stick represents the Moon, the students represent the Earth and a hanging lightbulb serves as the Sun. Students move the "Moon" around them to discover the different phases. They fill in the position of the Moon and its corresponding phase in a worksheet.

Subject:
Engineering
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Catie Liken
Teresa Tetlow
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Moon Walk
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students learn about the Earth's only natural satellite, the Moon. They discuss the Moon's surface features and human exploration. They also learn about how engineers develop technologies to study and explore the Moon, which also helps us learn more about the Earth.

Subject:
Engineering
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Jane Evenson
Jessica Butterfield
Jessica Todd
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sam Semakula
Date Added:
09/18/2014
A Roundabout Way to Mars
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students explore orbit transfers and, specifically, Hohmann transfers. They investigate the orbits of Earth and Mars by using cardboard and string. Students learn about the planets' orbits around the sun, and about a transfer orbit from one planet to the other. After the activity, students will know exactly what is meant by a delta-v maneuver!

Subject:
Engineering
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Penny Axelrad
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Solar System!
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

An introduction to our solar system the planets, our Sun and Moon. To begin, students learn about the history and engineering of space travel. They make simple rockets to acquire a basic understanding Newton's third law of motion. They explore energy transfer concepts and use renewable solar energy for cooking. They see how engineers design tools, equipment and spacecraft to go where it is too far and too dangerous for humans. They explore the Earth's water cycle, and gravity as applied to orbiting bodies. They learn the steps of the design process as they create their own models of planetary rovers made of edible parts. Students conduct experiments to examine soil for signs of life, and explore orbit transfers. While studying about the International Space Station, they investigate the realities of living in space. Activities explore low gravity on human muscles, eating in microgravity, and satellite tracking. Finally, students learn about the context of our solar system the universe as they learn about the Hubble Space Telescope, celestial navigation and spectroscopy.

Subject:
Engineering
Astronomy
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Solar System SciPack Meteorite and Comet Simulations
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This is a 30 minute lesson where students will be able to:
1. Describe the size, composition, and motion of meteors and comets.
2. Discuss the similarities and differences in comets and meteors.
3. Explain:
a. what happens to meteors as they fall through the atmosphere
b. why comet debris is observed as a meteor shower from the Earth
c. how the planet's gravitational forces affect a comet's orbit.
d. why we see a comet's tail.
e. why a comet disintegrates when it gets close to the sun.

Subject:
Applied Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Maggie Bly
Date Added:
06/20/2018
Water: Modeling a Watershed by T. Kabealo & B. Cullinan (42.WCS)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Students will be working with the problem “How do we know water is safe to drink?” under the theme of “How does access to clean water and sanitation affect a culture?” Students participate in labs related to the hydrologic cycle and water quality. Students design and build a local watershed to model the movement of water across land. Students also research and explore print, video, and audio resources for news and information about local / global water pollution / impact by and on humans.Students share what they have researched with each other, then create an artifact (infographic, video, slideshow, animation, comic strip, etc) intended to educate peers and younger students about water quality and its importance. Ideally, finished products would be shared with others in an authentic setting.Standards:Ohio Science Standards (Grade 7)CCSS English Language Arts (Grade 7)

Subject:
Environmental Science
World Cultures
Educational Technology
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Cathryn Chellis
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
08/30/2018