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  • WY.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.4
Alliteration, Onomatopoeia, and Idiom
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This seminar will introduce three of eight types of figurative language (alliteration, onomatopoeia, and idiom).  Through mainly fictional texts( tongue twisters, comics, songs, etc.), you will  identify these types of figurative language, determine their meanings, and  formulate project-based activities to prove your understanding of these common figurative language types.StandardsCC.1.2.5.F  Determine the meaning of words and phrase as they are used in grade-level text, including interpretation of figurative language. 

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Eye on Idioms
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The activity includes a series of exercises, in which students view the literal representations of idioms and then examine the metaphorical meanings of the idioms.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
08/19/2013
Figurative Bud
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In Bud, Not Buddy, we see the world through the eyes of our narrator, Bud. The way he describes the world tells us a bit about who he is as a character, too. In this assignment, we will focus on figurative language that tells us more about the text.Figurative language is language that is not literal, or exactly accurate, but instead appeals to the senses by describing something in an unlikely way. Examples are metaphors, similes, hyperboles, and personifications. These can make writing more persuasive, effective, or impactful.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tim Batiuk
Date Added:
01/02/2018
Figurative Language: Hyperbole/Exaggeration/Adage/Proverb
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During this seminar you will be exposed to the last of the figurative language types (hyperbole,  exaggeration, adage and proverb).  This seminar is unique because depending where you research will affect how you perceive them.  Some sites express them as different;  hyperboles vs. exaggerations  and adages vs. proverbs.  On the other hand, some websites view them as one and the same.  A hyperbole is a type of exaggeration and an adage is a type of proverb.  Regardless of how you view them, the most important piece of this seminar is to be able to interpret their meanings when used in texts, songs, movies, life experiences, etc. StandardsCC.1.2.5.F  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in grade-level text, including interpretation of figurative language.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Grade 6: Belonging, Lesson 1 (MDK12 Remix)
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This lesson guides students in an examination of a poet's use of figurative language and word choice to convey themes of belonging and identity.  Students will delve into the concept of the unit theme, “Belonging” and the essential question, "In what ways does our need to feel a sense of belonging conflict with our individuality?" Students will write a short essay analyzing the ways in which a poet uses figurative language and word choice to convey the speaker's sense of him/herself as an individual and as someone who feels he/she is not accepted. Image source:  "Attain" by Nick Youngson from TheBlueDiamondGallery.com at http://thebluediamondgallery.com/tablet-dictionary/a/attain.html  Creative Commons 3 - CC BY-SA 3.0

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Annmarie Steltzer
Kathleen Maher-Baker
MSDE Admin
Date Added:
06/26/2018
Grade 6: Belonging, Lesson 2 (remix)
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This two-day lesson focuses on the reading and analysis of “The Circuit” by Francisco Jiménez. The goal of this lesson is for students to make inferences about the challenges and changes required of the story’s character, Panchito, and to find evidence of the author’s craft that develops the narrative.Students will reflect upon the relevance of the essential question (In what ways does our need to feel a sense of belonging conflict with our individuality?) to the narrator's experience.  In particular, students should recognize that the reality of the narrator's individual situation acts as an impediment to his efforts to belong to a community.Although "The Circuit" is classified as a work of fiction, the author states that the stories represent the lives of his family members.  Students will appreciate Jimenez's descriptive, character-driven writing. 

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Annmarie Steltzer
Kathleen Maher-Baker
MSDE Admin
Date Added:
07/18/2018
Grade 6 ELA Module 1
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In this module, students are involved in a deep study of mythology, its purposes, and elements. Students will read Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief (780L), a high-interest novel about a sixth-grade boy on a hero’s journey. Some students may be familiar with this popular fantasy book; in this module, students will read with a focus on the archetypal journey and close reading of the many mythical allusions. As they begin the novel, students also will read a complex informational text that explains the archetypal storyline of the hero’s journey which has been repeated in literature throughout the centuries. Through the close reading of literary and informational texts, students will learn multiple strategies for acquiring and using academic vocabulary. Students will also build routines and expectations of discussion as they work in small groups. At the end of Unit 1, having read half of the novel, students will explain, with text-based evidence, how Percy is an archetypal hero. In Unit 2, students will continue reading The Lightning Thief (more independently): in class, they will focus on the novel’s many allusions to classic myths; those allusions will serve as an entry point into a deeper study of Greek mythology. They also will continue to build their informational reading skills through the close reading of texts about the close reading of texts about the elements of myths. This will create a conceptual framework to support students’ reading of mythology. As a whole class, students will closely read several complex Greek myths. They then will work in small groups to build expertise on one of those myths. In Unit 3, students shift their focus to narrative writing skills. This series of writing lessons will scaffold students to their final performance task in which they will apply their knowledge about the hero’s journey and the elements of mythology to create their own hero’s journey stories.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/01/2013
Literal and Non-literal Meanings of  Words and Idioms
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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In this lesson, students will distinguish the literal and non-literal meanings of verbal and written content in different contexts. The lesson targets adult learners of English who have demonstrated Grades 3- 4 or B-C reading level. Learners will demonstrate an understanding of idioms by using context clues in the sentences to help figure out the meanings of idioms, by drawing out idioms without using words or letters, by giving written tips using idioms, and by creating greeting cards.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Ms. Alex Elrington
Date Added:
06/23/2016
Question Baskets: "Shrouded in Myth"
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It's helpful to know how to ask questions. Review the full Shrouded in Myth text, and formulate a question about the text. The question can be simple or complex, and it may not even have a single right answer.Here is an example question about the text:"What does the word 'prophecy' mean?"Here is another:"What part did you find most exciting?"Respond below with three original questions that have not been posted. You don't need to answer any...yet!

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tim Batiuk
Date Added:
01/02/2018
Shakespeare the Player: Illustrating Elizabethan Theatre through A Midsummer Night's Dream
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this activity, you and your students will explore Elizabethan stage practices as the rustic yet enthusiastic amateur actors from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. While it's not necessary to teach Shakespeare's biography while studying his plays, sometimes opportunities to explore his world through his own eyes present themselves in his text. Students' new insights into the text will provide them with a deeper appreciation for Shakespeare’s world. This activity will take one or two class periods.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
Caitlin S Griffin and Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger
Date Added:
01/30/2015
Similes, Metaphors, and Personification
Conditions of Use:
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This seminar will introduce three of eight types of figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification).  Through song lyrics, poems, videos, interactive activities, and collaboration, you will learn to recognize, determine meanings, and identify comparisons within similes, metaphors, and personification examples.StandardsCC.1.2.5.F  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in grade-level text, including interpretation of figurative language.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
02/07/2018