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Advances in nanotechnology
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In this podcast, Professor Moriarty discusses nanotechnology, and how it has led to a convergence of the traditional sciences. He talks about the commercial applications of nanotechnology such as hard disk technology in laptops, stain free materials and fabrics, self-cleaning windows and advanced water filtration.

He also touches on some of the myths about nanotechnology as well as some of the real dangers of Nanotechnology and the steps governments are taking to regulate it.

Professor Moriarty is a researcher in the field of nanotechnology.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Moriarty
Afferent and efferent nerves
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As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

This learning object compares and contrasts afferent and efferent nerves of the peripheral nervous system.

This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy.

Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Andy Meal
BURN - Biosciences Undergraduate Research at Nottingham
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This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

Research produced 2006 - 2009.

BURN brings final year undergraduate research work to public view in a professional and relevant way. The students represented here have risen to the challenges of doing rigorous research and presenting their work to a wider audience. Their articles show the distance they have travelled during their studies. They also demonstrate the inquiry and critical thinking skills that have been developed. As graduates, they will be able to exploit these valuable skills in their careers, whether they continue in science or whatever path they may choose.

Suitable for undergraduate study

Coordinated by Dr Martin Luck, School of Biosciences

Dr Martin Luck is Associate Professor of Animal Physiology at the University of Nottingham. After reading Animal Physiology at Nottingham, he moved to the University of Leeds to complete a Masters in Steroid Endocrinology and a PhD in Physiology. He carried out post-doctoral research at the University of Southampton and then moved to Hamburg, Germany where he led a research group investigating ovarian follicular development. He returned to Nottingham as an academic in 1990. Dr Luck also has a BA in Mathematics, is a Fellow of the Society of Biology and the Higher Education Academy and is Chair of the Management Board of Bioscience Horizons, the National Undergraduate Research Journal. He has held teaching advisory posts at the University and been a consultant for the Quality Assurance Agency and Higher Education Academy.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Martin Luck
Back-bench rebels
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Philip Cowley, Reader in the University’s School of Politics and International Relations, was recently nominated for the Times Higher young researcher of the year award. In this podcast, Philip discusses his research into back bench rebellions within the British parliament. Philip describes his research as practical politics, linking academic research to the real world of political debate.

Since the British Labour party’s re-election with a reduced majority of 66 MPs in May 2005, some back bench Labour MPs have continued to vote against their own party, led by Prime Minister Tony Blair. This has forced the British government to make a series of concessions on a range of legislation. After the election, it was widely anticipated that Labour party MPs, with a reduced majority, would have to tow the party line. Philip discusses his research into back bench behaviour, highlighting that the British back bench MPs have traditionally been more rebellious than many people may expect.

Philip also discusses the issues behind the bank bench revolts, in particular highlighting that back bench rebellions are now at a post war high–ironically, as the new Labour government of 1997 was determined not to be a ‘split’ party like the previous Conservative government led by John Major. Philip also discusses the impact of the Tony Blair’s announcement that he will step down as leader of the Labour party, and whether this has affected the frequency of revolts.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Cowley
Back-bench rebels
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Philip Cowley, Reader in the University’s School of Politics and International Relations, was recently nominated for the Times Higher young researcher of the year award. In this podcast, Philip discusses his research into back bench rebellions within the British parliament. Philip describes his research as practical politics, linking academic research to the real world of political debate.

Since the British Labour party’s re-election with a reduced majority of 66 MPs in May 2005, some back bench Labour MPs have continued to vote against their own party, led by Prime Minister Tony Blair. This has forced the British government to make a series of concessions on a range of legislation. After the election, it was widely anticipated that Labour party MPs, with a reduced majority, would have to tow the party line. Philip discusses his research into back bench behaviour, highlighting that the British back bench MPs have traditionally been more rebellious than many people may expect.

Philip also discusses the issues behind the bank bench revolts, in particular highlighting that back bench rebellions are now at a post war high–ironically, as the new Labour government of 1997 was determined not to be a ‘split’ party like the previous Conservative government led by John Major. Philip also discusses the impact of the Tony Blair’s announcement that he will step down as leader of the Labour party, and whether this has affected the frequency of revolts.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Cowley
Beyond infinity
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This popular maths talk gives an introduction to various different kinds of infinity, both countable and uncountable. These concepts are illustrated in a somewhat informal way using the notion of Hilbert's infinite hotel. In this talk, the hotel manager tries to fit various infinite collections of guests into the hotel. The students should learn that many apparently different types of infinity are really the same size. However, there are genuinely "more" real numbers than there are positive integers, as is shown in the more challenging final section, using Cantor's diagonalization argument.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Joel Feinstein
Blood vessels
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As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

This learning object explains and describes how the structure of a blood vessel is related to its function. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy.

Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Cowley
British prime ministers 1783 - 1852
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To access this learning object you should copy and paste this link into a browser: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~cczjrt/pm/

The 'view resource' link on the right hand side of this page is not currently working.

This learning object on British Prime Ministers, 1783-1852, is designed to support the programme of lectures and seminars on the module The Many Faces of Reform: British politics, 1790-1850.

It will help familiarise you with the leading political figures and parliamentary groupings of the period we are studying. It will also test your knowledge of this information and help you think about some of the wider political developments which we will be studying.

Copyright Information: All of the images included in this resource are out of copyright and available under creative commons licence. They were sourced from Manuscripts and Special Collections at the University of Nottingham.

More information is available at:

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/manuscriptsandspecialcollections

Suitable for study at all undergraduate and post graduate levels.

Dr Richard Gaunt, School of History

Dr Gaunt works on late eighteenth and early nineteenth century British history, with a particular specialism in the political and electoral history of the age. Research interests encompass work on national political figures such as Sir Robert Peel, the Duke of Wellington and Benjamin Disraeli as well as individuals with a strong Nottinghamshire connection, such as the 4th Duke of Newcastle (of Clumber Park) and William Edward and Godfrey Tallents (solicitors, land stewards and political agents of Newark).

Dr Gaunt has specialist research interests in the use of biographies, diaries and autobiographies and maintains scholarly interest in the political cartoons and caricatures of the age. These have given rise to publications in a range of academic and general readership outlets, to reviews and review articles and to exhibitions. He has also developed a number of web-based applications, drawing on research in the manuscripts and special collections held at Nottingham, in particular, a website exploring political themes from the time of the 4th Duke of Newcastle including working class unrest, electioneering and issues relating to Ireland.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Richard Gaunt
Julian Tenney
Sandra Huskinson
Caistor dig
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A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Caistor dig
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A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Career skills in economics
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This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught in Autumn Semester 2009

Careers skills is a compulsory module for all Year 2 Economics students. It is not available to students from outside the School. It is one of a number of modules that make up the Nottingham Advantage Award.

The Nottingham Advantage Award is a new initiative focusing on student skills, employability and personal and academic development. Initially created for undergraduate students, it aims to develop the kind of competencies, learning and evaluation skills that employers are looking for in talented new graduates.

For more information on the Award you can visit: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy/introduction/life/advantageaward

Suitable For: Undergraduate Year Two Students

Dr David Harvey

Dr David Harvey has been a member of staff in the School of Economics since October 2003. He is a Reader in Econometrics. His research interests are in the area of time series econometrics, in particular tests for unit roots and structural change, forecast evaluation and applied time series analysis in general. He has published in journals such as the Journal of Econometrics, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Econometrics Journal, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Forecasting, International Journal of Forecasting.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr David Harvey
Cell membranes and compartments
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Outlines the proposed structure and properties of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells and identifies cell compartments that are separated from each other by at least one plasma membrane.

Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Andy Meal
Cell organelles
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As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

This learning object describes the structure and function of mammalian cell organelles. It is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy.

Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Andy Meal
Challenging reality
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A behind the scenes interview with Professor Christopher Barnatt, Director and Producer of a new TV documentary on what we perceive to be real, and what, if any, future lies ahead for us.

The TV documentary was televised in April 2009 and was based on a book written by Professor Christopher Barnatt in 1997, also entitled Challenging Reality, which focused on momentous change across history. The new television series developed this theme further, with input from numerous other experts at the University of Nottingham, across three episodes looking at human achievement, geography and communications and the individual and their role in society.

April 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Professor Christopher Barnatt, Associate Professor Business School and Director Producer of "Challenging Reality"

Professor Christopher Barnatt has worked in the Business School at the University of Nottingham for around 19 years, where he is now Director of Teaching. Outside of that role he teaches computing and technology modules, mainly on undergraduate programmes. He is currently researching in the areas of Future Studies, Web 2.0, and green computing, and is actively involved in research, online teaching support and development in a variety of media termed as "Higher Education 2.0".

Outside of the University he is the author of ExplainingComputers.com and ExplainingTheFuture.com, as well as a regular contributor to the Morning Show on BBC Radio Nottingham and "The Night Before" on Kerrang! Radio.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Associate Professor Christopher Barnatt
Challenging reality
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A behind the scenes interview with Professor Christopher Barnatt, Director and Producer of a new TV documentary on what we perceive to be real, and what, if any, future lies ahead for us.

The TV documentary was televised in April 2009 and was based on a book written by Professor Christopher Barnatt in 1997, also entitled Challenging Reality, which focused on momentus change across history. The new television series developed this theme further, with input from numerous other experts at the University of Nottingham, across three episodes looking at human achievement, geography and communications and the individual and their role in society.

April 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Professor Christopher Barnatt, Associate Professor Business School and Director Producer of "Challenging Reality"

Professor Christopher Barnatt has worked in the Business School at the University of Nottingham for around 19 years, where he is now Director of Teaching. Outside of that role he teaches computing and technology modules, mainly on undergraduate programmes. He is currently researching in the areas of Future Studies, Web 2.0, and green computing, and is actively involved in research, online teaching support and development in a variety of media termed as "Higher Education 2.0".

Outside of the University he is the author of ExplainingComputers.com and ExplainingTheFuture.com, as well as a regular contributor to the Morning Show on BBC Radio Nottingham and "The Night Before" on Kerrang! Radio.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Associate Professor Christopher Barnatt
Clinical leadership and management of change
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The content presented here provides module information, teaching materials and assessment details for module B74GS6 ‘Clinical Leadership and Management of Change’. This module is offered as part of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing Studies, Division of Nursing, University of Nottingham.

The content presented throughout includes module descriptions, lecture notes, workshop notes, case studies, clinical skills and reading lists provided to postgraduate students at the University of Nottingham.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Chris Simpson
Collagen formation
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As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

The learning object describes how collagen fibres are assembled in the formation of connective tissue. The learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy.

Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Colleen McCants
Dr Andy Meal
Complex health needs 2: adult
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The content presented here provides module information, teaching materials and assessment details for module B74GA5 ‘Complex Health Needs 2: Adult’. This module is offered as part of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing Studies, Division of Nursing, University of Nottingham.

The content presented throughout includes module descriptions, lecture notes, workshop notes, case studies, clinical skills and reading lists provided to postgraduate students at the University of Nottingham.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Stuart Nairn