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  • MCCRS.Math.Content.HSG-MG.A.1
A-CED Regular Tessellations of the plane
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This task examines the ways in which the plane can be covered by regular polygons in a very strict arrangement called a regular tessellation. These tessellations are studied here using algebra, which enters the picture via the formula for the measure of the interior angles of a regular polygon (which should therefore be introduced or reviewed before beginning the task). The goal of the task is to use algebra in order to understand which tessellations of the plane with regular polygons are possible.

Subject:
Mathematics
Algebra
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
01/21/2013
Area of Irregular Shapes
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Overview: Math in Real Life (MiRL) supports the expansion of regional networks to create an environment of innovation in math teaching and learning.  The focus on applied mathematics supports the natural interconnectedness of math to other disciplines while infusing relevance for students.  MiRL supports a limited number of networked math learning communities that focus on developing and testing applied problems in mathematics.  The networks help math teachers refine innovative teaching strategies with the guidance of regional partners and the Oregon Department of Education.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Mark Freed
Date Added:
08/24/2020
Buoyant Boats
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating

Students conduct a simple experiment to see how the water level changes in a beaker when a lump of clay sinks in the water and when the same lump of clay is shaped into a bowl that floats in the water. They notice that the floating clay displaces more water than the sinking clay does, perhaps a surprising result. Then they determine the mass of water that is displaced when the clay floats in the water. A comparison of this mass to the mass of the clay itself reveals that they are approximately the same.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Remix
Classifying Special Parallelograms Flowchart
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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I would recommned using this task after feeling confident in your students' understanding of the properties of a parallelogram. While it could serve as a review, I think it is best suited as in introductory piece to get students to see how the properties have a trickle down effect to other quadrilaterals.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Mitch Curtis
Date Added:
10/30/2018
Concord Consortium: Intermolecular Attractions
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This concept-building module contains a variety of simulations for exploring factors that cause molecules to attract each other. It was developed to help secondary students understand both polar and non-polar covalent bonding. Users can manipulate models to see how the strength of attraction is affected by distance from one molecule to another, by heating the substance, and by mixing polar and non-polar substances. Part II of the activity is devoted to hydrogen bonds, and explores why water is one of the most important molecules for life's existence. This item is part of the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit research and development organization dedicated to transforming education through technology.

Subject:
Life Science
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
National Science Foundation
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
08/22/2011
Eratosthenes and the Circumference of the Earth
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The accuracy and simplicity of this experiment are amazing. A wonderful project for students, which would necessarily involve team work with a different school and most likely a school in a different state or region of the country, would be to try to repeat Eratosthenes' experiment.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
12/15/2012
G-GMD Global Positioning System II
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Reflective of the modernness of the technology involved, this is a challenging geometric modelling task in which students discover from scratch the geometric principles underlying the software used by GPS systems.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
01/21/2013
G-MG Coins in a Circular Pattern
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This task complements ``Seven Circles'' I, II, and III. This is a hands-on activity which students could work on at many different levels and the activity leads to many interesting questions for further investigation.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Trigonometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
08/21/2012
G-MG Seven Circles III
Unrestricted Use
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This task provides an opportunity to model a concrete situation with mathematics. Once a representative picture of the situation described in the problem is drawn (the teacher may provide guidance here as necessary), the solution of the task requires an understanding of the definition of the sine function. When the task is complete, new insight is shed on the ``Seven Circles I'' problem which initiated this investigation as is noted at the end of the solution.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Trigonometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
08/21/2012
G-MG Tennis Balls in a Can
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This task is inspired by the derivation of the volume formula for the sphere. If a sphere of radius 1 is enclosed in a cylinder of radius 1 and height 2, then the volume not occupied by the sphere is equal to the volume of a Ňdouble-naped coneÓ with vertex at the center of the sphere and bases equal to the bases of the cylinder.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
05/01/2012
G-MG Tilt of earth's axis and the four seasons
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: The geometry of the earth-sun interaction plays a very prominent role in many aspects of our lives that we take for granted, like the variable length o...

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
05/24/2013
G-SRT, G-MG How far is the horizon?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Milong and her friends are at the beach looking out onto the ocean on a clear day and they wonder how far away the horizon is. About how far can Milong...

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
10/30/2013
Geometry Module 2: Similarity, Proof, and Trigonometry
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Just as rigid motions are used to define congruence in Module 1, so dilations are added to define similarity in Module 2.  To be able to discuss similarity, students must first have a clear understanding of how dilations behave.  This is done in two parts, by studying how dilations yield scale drawings and reasoning why the properties of dilations must be true. Once dilations are clearly established, similarity transformations are defined and length and angle relationships are examined, yielding triangle similarity criteria.  An in-depth look at similarity within right triangles follows, and finally the module ends with a study of right triangle trigonometry.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
07/03/2014
Geometry Module 3:  Extending to Three Dimensions
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Module 3, Extending to Three Dimensions, builds on students’ understanding of congruence in Module 1 and similarity in Module 2 to prove volume formulas for solids. The student materials consist of the student pages for each lesson in Module 3. The copy ready materials are a collection of the module assessments, lesson exit tickets and fluency exercises from the teacher materials.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
07/03/2014
Hexagonal Pattern of Beehives
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The goal of this task is to use geometry study the structure of beehives. Beehives have a tremendous simplicity as they are constructed entirely of small, equally sized walls. In order to as useful as possible for the hive, the goal should be to create the largest possible volume using the least amount of materials. In other words, the ratio of the volume of each cell to its surface area needs to be maximized. This then reduces to maximizing the ratio of the surface area of the cell shape to its perimeter.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
01/21/2013
How Many Cells are in the Human Body?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The purpose of this task is for students to apply the concepts of mass, volume, and density in a real-world context. There are several ways one might approach the problem, e.g., by estimating the volume of a person and dividing by the volume of a cell.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
11/13/2012
How Many Leaves on a Tree? (Version 2)
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CC BY
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In this problem, the variables a,b,c, and d are introduced to represent important quantities for this esimate: students should all understand where the formula in the solution for the number of leaves comes from. Estimating the values of these variables is much trickier and the teacher should expect and allow a wide range of variation here.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
01/20/2013