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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4
You Kiss by the Book: Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet
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Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet presents "star-cross'd" lovers whose plight has become the subject of many of today's novels, plays, films, and television dramas. Explore with your students the techniques that Shakespeare uses to capture the magic of the couple's first meeting and to make that meeting so memorable. This lesson plan complements the study of plot and characterization in Romeo and Juliet in its focus on lyrical form and convention that heighten the impact of the action on the stage.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment
Date Added:
09/19/2000
A Matter of Identity: Writing An Extended Metaphor Poem
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Students apply their knowledge of literary devices by reading and analyzing the poem "Identity" by Julio Noboa Polanco. Students then create their own poem incorporating the literary devices studied and analyzed in the above mentioned poem. This lesson includes modifications for a Novice Low Limited English student.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Carrie Mabry
Susan Brooks
Date Added:
06/17/2004
How Ironic!
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This lesson will introduce students to the concept of irony. Verbal, situational, and dramatic irony will be defined, but the focus of the lesson is situational irony. This lesson can be used prior to teaching longer, more complex short stories that contain situational irony. This lesson is modified for an English Language Learner (ELL) who reads at the Intermediate Low (IL) level.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Ann Gerber
Tericia Summers
Date Added:
06/15/2004
Romeo and Juliet: the Balcony Scene (Act 2, Scene 2)
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O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo? Lesson will help struggling readers to comprehend figurative language and overall meaning in the famous balcony scene. It will also compare text to two media depictions. This lesson has been created with exceptional children and limited English proficient (novice low) students in mind.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Elizabeth MackieVicki Moats
Date Added:
06/16/2004
Just Like Brian Wilson Did: Using Allusion to Teach Imagery and Theme
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Beginning ENG I students are introduced to the general concepts of imagery (including symbolism) and theme in short literature in a lesson that features two contemporary pop songs and their lyrics. Serves as a useful attention getting exercise for low-level ENG I students who must become familiar with general literary concepts and terms for the ENG I EOC.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Jeffrey Weeks
Date Added:
06/02/2000
Analyzing Author Style Using Sentence Combining
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This activity should be completed before reading the essay "Beach People, Mountain People" by Suzanne Britt. Students will combine three sets of kernel sentences based on the first paragraph of Britt's writing. They will then compare their sentences to Britt's. The class will discuss what sentence combining strategy or strategies they used and observe how Britt varies her sentences.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Vickie Smith
Date Added:
01/21/2003
Grade 9 ELA Module 2
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In this module, students engage with literature and nonfiction texts that develop central ideas of guilt, obsession, and madness, among others. Building on work with evidence-based analysis and debate in Module 1, students will produce evidence-based claims to analyze the development of central ideas and text structure. Students will develop and strengthen their writing by revising and editing, and refine their speaking and listening skills through discussion-based assessments.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Grade 9 ELA Module 1
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In this module, students will read, discuss, and analyze contemporary and classic texts, focusing on how complex characters develop through interactions with one another and how authors structure text to accomplish that development. There will be a strong emphasis on reading closely and responding to text dependent questions, annotating text, and developing academic vocabulary in context.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/02/2013
Grade 9 Author's Craft: Character, Diction, and Structure Lesson Plan #2 (MDK12 Remix)
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In this lesson students will read and analyze “The Flowers” by Alice Walker. Lesson 2 from the Author’s Craft unit focuses on diction.  Students will examine how Walker’s word choice creates tonal shifts in the story that support the theme. The lesson requires student to collect evidence, discuss, and complete a writing assignment in which they continue the story while using diction to maintain the tone. Image source:  "Rose" by Kapa65 on Pixabay.com.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Emily Scherer
Primary Source Exemplar: Progress, Conflict, and Outcomes
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This unit is centered around an anchor text that may be common among content area teachers in a high school setting. Although this unit may be incorporated into any high-school English class, it is aligned with Common Core standards for 9-10. This unit will primarily focus on informational and argumentative texts, and can be used to incorporate more informational texts (as directed by the Common Core) into English classrooms at the high school level. This unit is best suited to a collaborative model of development in which ELA and content area teachers share an anchor text (The Universal Declaration of Human Rights) and communicate about how to connect diverse skills to common texts and essential questions.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Erik Iwersen
Date Added:
06/14/2017
Symbolism with Images
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This lesson uses images and the "I See...and I Wonder" strategy to get students thinking about the bigger concepts that objects might represent.  Students often see symbols as mere objects with only a only face value because of the speed with which they encounter them.  However, if we can encourage students to take more time to study an object, other concepts or meanings can come to light.This lesson uses images as an entry point to symbolism because they are less threatening than literature.  The images provided are a starting place, but feel free to remix and use your own images. This journaling activity is about writing (and discussing) to learn.  It can be graded or just formative.  Either way, items to assess would include:Do students really dig into the details, both large and small?Are they being thorough "readers" of the image in the quality of their "wondering"?  There is no length requirement, but the timer recommendations do communicate an expectation that responses to be more than just a sentence or two or a very brief list.For task 2, do students begin to make some interpretive claims?  Are those claims valid?  Are they grounded in the details?If students are struggling to make interpretive claims that make sense with the image, back up and do another image in small groups that might allow more modeling, deeper thinking prompts, or even questioning the students to better understand their interpretations.If students are successful with the images, transition to a short peice of text like a poem.  Students can use the same process of "I See...and I Wonder."  The Task 2 questions can be slightly modified to apply to text rather than image.

Subject:
Literature
Communication
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Kim Grissom
Date Added:
10/06/2017
Constructing New Understanding Through Choral Readings of Shakespeare
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After reading "The Tempest" or any other play by William Shakespeare, students work in small groups to plan, compose, and perform a choral reading based on a character or theme.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/28/2013
Quiz RL.4: The Gift of the Magi
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A short quiz on CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4, featuring a passage from O. Henry's short story, "The Gift of the Magi". The passage has a Dale-Chall text difficulty level of 5-6, and a Flesch-Kincaid level of 5.0.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Terrence Reilly Jr.
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Thematic and Organizational Patterns in Mclaurin's "The Rite Time of Night"
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Students will learn to identify and color-code thematic and organizational patterns found in the narrative and then use two-column notetaking to highlight how these patterns helped McLaurin give his story focus and organization. As a suggested follow-up activity, students are given ideas for writing their own narratives, using similar techniques as McLaurin.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Vickie Smith
Date Added:
01/21/2003
Grade 10 ELA Module 4
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In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze nonfiction and dramatic texts, focusing on how the authors convey and develop central ideas concerning imbalance, disorder, tragedy, mortality, and fate.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
07/09/2014
Shakespeare the Player: Illustrating Elizabethan Theatre through A Midsummer Night's Dream
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In this activity, you and your students will explore Elizabethan stage practices as the rustic yet enthusiastic amateur actors from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. While it's not necessary to teach Shakespeare's biography while studying his plays, sometimes opportunities to explore his world through his own eyes present themselves in his text. Students' new insights into the text will provide them with a deeper appreciation for Shakespeare’s world. This activity will take one or two class periods.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
Caitlin S Griffin and Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger
Date Added:
01/30/2015