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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.3
The American Dream
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson invites students to search and sift through rare print documents, early motion pictures, photographs, and recorded sounds from The Library of Congress. Students experience the depth and breadth of the digital resources of the Library, tell the story of a decade, and help define the American Dream.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
06/07/2000
7th Grade Historical Literacy Units
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

7th Grade Historical Literacy consists of two 43 minute class periods. Writing is one 43 minute block and reading is another. The teacher has picked themes based on social studies standards, and a read-aloud novel based on social studies serves as the mentor text for writing and reading skills. More social studies content is addressed in reading through teaching nonfiction reading skills and discussion.
Standards reflect CCSS ELA, Reading, and Social Studies Standards.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Jennifer Mortensen
Jessica Leonard
Date Added:
04/16/2019
Territory and Treaty Making: A study of Tribes, Westward Expansion, and Conflict
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This unit is focused on the examination of a single topic, in this case, the Native Americans of the inland Northwest and conflict that arose when other non-native people started to settle in the northwest, and to specifically address the native populations that lived in the inland northwest. The materials were created to be one coherent arc of instruction focused on one topic. The module was designed to include teaching notes that signal the kind of planning and thinking such instruction requires: close reading with complex text, and specific instructional strategies or protocols are described that support students’ reading and writing with evidence are described in enough detail to make it very clear what is required of students and how to support students in doing this rigorous work. Materials include summative assessment of content and process, central texts, key resources, and protocols that support and facilitate student learning.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Standing up against a Dystopian Society
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

During this problem-based learning unit, students will explore dystopian societies of past and in short stories in order to identify dystopian elements in today’s society.  In turn, students will have a choice between multiple product outputs in which they will apply what they have learned to modern day life and provide ideas of how to improve our society by combating these dystopian elements.*Students will need some prior knowledge of Nazi Germany, Civil Rights America in 1930’s, Present Day China, and Sierra Leone in order to make connections to why these societies have dystopian elements.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Indian Boarding Schools
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In the late 1800s, the United States supported an educational experiment that the government hoped would change the traditions and customs of American Indians. Special boarding schools were created in locations all over the United States with the purpose of "civilizing" American Indian youth . Thousands of Native American children were sent far from their homes to live in these schools and learn the ways of white culture. Many struggled with loneliness and fear away from their tribal homes and familiar customs. Some lost their lives to the influenza, tuberculosis, and measles outbreaks that spread quickly through the schools. Others thrived despite the hardships, formed lifelong friendships, and preserved their Indian identities. Through photographs, letters, reports, interviews, and other primary documents, students explore the forced acculturation of American Indians through government-run boarding schools.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
04/09/2004
Accountable Book Clubs: Focused Discussions
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students form literature circles, read "Esperanza Rising" or "Becoming Naomi Leon" by Pam MuĐoz Ryan, use a Critical Thinking Map to discuss social issues, and use a class wiki.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
08/23/2013
WWII  POW Escape Tools: Monopoly and concealment tools
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

During WWII Monopoly game boards, along with other types of games were used to hide small undetectable items such as a tiny compass, files, and silk maps. POW's used the items to escape. When America entered the war, they used the British model to incorporate hidden escape tools into board games through the US Army's Escape and Evasion section, run by the expertise of a Civil Engineer turned Intelligence Officer, Captain, Robley Winfrey.

One way to introduce these documents would be:

1) To ask students to come up with a list of items that might be needed to escape from a POW camp.

2) After a list is generated, I would set out several board
games and ask students to design a way to hide the items within the game.

3) Then, after sharing their plans, I would use the
documents to reveal the actual way items were concealed
This could be done through a variety of formats: student research, power point, short film clip, etc.

Follow up discussion: technology and ingenuity used to develop for these tools

Subject:
Education
History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Deborah Rowland
Date Added:
01/17/2018
African-American Identity in the Gilded Age
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Examine the tension experienced by African-Americans as they struggled to establish a vibrant and meaningful identity based on the promises of liberty and equality in the midst of a society that was ambivalent towards them and sought to impose an inferior definition upon them. The primary sources used are drawn from a time of great change that begins after Reconstruction's brief promise of full citizenship and ends with the First World War's Great Migration, when many African-Americans sought greater freedoms and opportunities by leaving the South for booming industrial cities elsewhere in the nation. The central question posed by these primary sources is how African-Americans were able to form a meaningful identity for themselves, reject the inferior images fastened upon them, and still maintain the strength to keep "from being torn asunder." Using the primary sources presented here, look for answers that bring your ideas together in ways that reflect the richness of the African-American experience.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Author:
Pat Adams-Caskie
Scott Culclasure
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Waldseemüller's Map: World 1507
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The 1507 World Map by Martin Waldseemüller is one of the world's most important maps. For the first time, this map labels America and shows the continent as a separate land mass. It is often referred to as America's Birth Certificate. Students will investigate this map by looking closely at the details of each section of the map and then draw conclusions on the revelation of this new and unusual world to the people of 1507.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
02/16/2011
What Do You See?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This is a lesson in which students analyze a single Civil War photograph and then find and analyze related images. The aim is to help students see relationships between the Civil War and American industrialization.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/07/2000
Are You Breaking the Law? Patriotic Canadians Will Not Hoard Food
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Poster shows a man and woman with bags of hoarded flour and sugar looking at the silhouette of a policeman walking by their blind-covered window. A Canada Food Board statement, detailing fines for hoarding, hangs on the wall. Title from item.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - World War I Posters
Date Added:
06/18/2013
Common Core Reading Grade 7 Analyzing Interactions in a Text
Rating

In this lesson, students will:
• Identify relationships between individuals, events, and ideas in informational text.
• Analyze how interactions between individuals, events, and ideas influence other events and ideas.
Aligned with Common Core standard RI.7.3

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Curriculum Associates
Date Added:
01/28/2016
The U.S. Constitution: Continuity and Change in the Governing of the United States
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson, a supplement to a study of the Constitutional Convention, focuses on The Committee of Detail's draft of the Constitution submitted on 6 August 1787. The delegates debated its contents for a month before referring the document to the Committee of Style. The Committee's report, presented to the Convention on 12 September, became the Constitution of the United States.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
02/16/2011