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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.9
Understanding Organic: Connections to Action in the Garden Classroom
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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***This curriculum is provided by The Edible Schoolyard Project with full permission to share*** Understanding Organic: Connections to Action in the Garden Classroom is a garden and classroom-based curriculum for middle to high school students that explores the concepts and meanings of organic agriculture. The curriculum consists of a short preparatory unit, a sequence of ten core lessons, and twelve optional extension inquiries that can also be taught as standalone lessons. The ten core lessons utilize hands-on explorations of organic practices and feature textual analysis and open discussions to examine the complex meanings of organic. The final project workbook introduces students to a social action project in which students apply their knowledge and experiences to enact justice-oriented change related to organic. We recommend that you start by reading the curriculum overview linked below before reading individual lessons. 

Subject:
Environmental Science
Agriculture
Environmental Studies
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
The Bee Cause Project
Date Added:
08/19/2021
Cultivating Washington: The History of Our State's Food, Land, and People
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

The Cultivating Washington curriculum is intended to be a go-to resource for Washington state middle school educators seeking student-centered instructional materials that make learning about the history of the Pacific Northwest more relevant and meaningful for students.In addition, it is a resource for agricultural education teachers, parents, and community members interested in helping students discover the history and development of agriculture in the state of Washington.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Agriculture
U.S. History
Social Science
Cultural Geography
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Barbara Soots
Jerry Price
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
09/02/2020
Drumbeats in Time: How do local tribes contribute to the identity of the Kittitas Valley, both past and present?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
4.0 stars

Drumbeats in Time is a collaborative effort between the Thorp School District and members of the Kittitas Band of the Yakama Nation. These units are designed to integrate local Native American oral history and interview skills into the social studies curriculum to help students gain understanding of the life and times of various members of the Kittitas Valley.The sixth grade unit focuses on accounts of modern life and past life in order to develop an understanding of cultural awarness in the future.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Primary Source
Author:
Casceila Miller
Washington OSPI OER Project
Barbara Soots
Alexander Ahlgren
Carlee Stueckle
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Grade 6-8 Inquiry: Differentiate between Fact and Assumption
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

This inquiry by Cynthia Yurosko, Evergreen Public Schools, is based on the C3 Framework inquiry arc. The inquiry provides students with the opportunity to analyze, through the evaluation of words, how conflicts between the U.S. government and Native American tribes arose. Students will be asked to investigate federal reports, speeches, and news reports to discern U.S. leaders’ perspectives and compare these biases to the words of Native American leaders Chief Red Eagle and Chief Tecumseh.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
Barbara Soots
Cynthia Yurosko
Jerry Price
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
12/28/2020
Identifying Media Bias in News Sources for Middle School
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
4.0 stars

Every media source has a story to tell--a driving purpose. The media that people consume largely shapes their world views. The US public is becoming more divided partially due to the consumption of increasingly biased news. As a critical consumer of media, It is important to be able to separate fact from opinion. In this unit, adapted from the high school version, students will become critical consumers of news, by identifying media bias in order to become better informed citizens.  NOTE: This unit has been adapted for use at the middle school level from the resource Identifying Media Bias in News Sources by Sandra Stroup, Sally Drendel, Greg Saum, and Heidi Morris.

Subject:
Journalism
Educational Technology
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Game
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Amanda Schneider
Sandra Stroup
Sally Drendel
Heidi Morris
Megan Shinn
Date Added:
05/13/2021