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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1
Vote for Me! a Re-Election Editorial
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A research assignment in which students write an editorial for or against the re-election of a selected president.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Articles & More
Author:
David Walbert
Melissa Thibault
Date Added:
08/17/1971
Should Assault Weapons Be Banned?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Student readings review the origins of the AK-47, the 10-year federal ban on assault weapons, President Obama's views on guns, and the NRA's political clout. Discussion questions and an inquiry-oriented plan for "constructive controversy" follow.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Alan Shapiro
Date Added:
12/17/2012
English Language Arts 11
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

English III, American Literature, explores the literature of America from the narratives of the early colonists to the foundational documents of our forefathers, and the literature of our modern times. In English III, you will gain a firm grasp of the various literary periods throughout American history as well as the ability to analyze different genres and styles of notable American authors. As you progress through the course, you will gain an appreciation for American literature and an understanding of how the literature of the day acted as a reflection of the historical period from which it evolved. This course will also give you the opportunity to hone your own writing skills as you identify the characteristics of effective writing for a variety of different purposes and audiences.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
08/05/2013
Measuring Human Rights: High School Mathematics Unit
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No Strings Attached
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In this unit, students will read and interpret primary sources to address the question “How do we measure the attainment of human rights?” By exploring the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the UN’s Guide to Indicators of Human Rights, and data about development indicators from multiple databases, students will unpack the complexities of using indicators to measure human rights.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tamar Posner
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Our Rights Of The Child Scrapbook
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Respecting a child's race, colour, gender, religion, political view, nationality, origin of birth. What does this have to do with the students in my classroom or children all over the world? Ethics and social responsibility in the classroom are invited in this unit of study.Have your students ever thought about looking at an idea through different lenses? What about thinking about one item in different ways? Through the thinking, writing, speaking exercises the students will examine the Declaration of the Rights of The Child and will create a scrapbook weaving multiple genres.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Individual Authors
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
03/07/2012
After Newtown: National Rifle Association Vs. Gun Control
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In the wake of the tragic school shooting in Newtown, CT, students learn about and discuss renewed calls for gun control and the National Rifle Association's history of successfully resisting such reforms.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Mark Engler
Date Added:
01/25/2013
Wisdom from Poor Richard's Almanac
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This lesson helps students understand aphorisms and figurative language, through a cross examination of Poor Richard's Almanac with current popular culture for societal values and morality of each. Students must make inferences about social trends and values and then compare/contrast what the change or lack of change in these values says about society, generational differences, and the nature of values themselves.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Michael Hall
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Remix
#DoNow w/ GoPro Project--by Sara Layton
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This resource introduces the DoNow project in conjunction with the GoPro challenge. It explains how to implement this curriculum into a language arts classroom (virtual, bricks and mortar, or blended), with an overview, detailed plan, assignments and rubrics, and other resources.

This resource provides lesson plans aligned to CC Standards for language arts that can be adapted to a wide range of LA levels, from middle to high school.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Author:
Sara Layton
Date Added:
08/08/2019
Who are the Eastern Shoshone?
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Learn how and when the Eastern Shoshone came to Wyoming, what are the Shoshone values, and what are the people of the Eastern Shoshone like? In the accompanying lessons plans (found in the Support Materials), students will gain an understanding of the Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868 including its importance to the state of Wyoming and the Eastern Shoshone Tribe in 1868 and today. The American Bison, or Buffalo as preferred by most tribes, has a significant existence among the Native American people. For thousands of years, the great American Buffalo roamed the Great Plains, migrating from north to south, searching for areas on which to thrive. The Shoshone people depended on the buffalo for many things that included food, clothing, and shelter. Every part of the buffalo was used and provided for the people.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will study (Highlight, paraphrase and report) the Treaty of 1868 between the Eastern Shoshone Tribe and the United States Government.
Students will learn about the Eastern Shoshone people through the use of research and technology.
Students will understand that the history of the Shoshone people in the Wind River Mountains dates back thousands of years.
Students will understand that the circle of life continues in a perpetual cycle and is passed on through oral tradition. These stories often taught a lesson to young people.
Students will understand the indigenous perspective of interconnectedness. Students will understand how bison populations were devastated by western expansion.
Students will learn how to construct, read, compare and analyze different population graphs.
Students will understand how the diets of the Shoshone people varied depending on the areas in which they lived.
Students will acquire knowledge of the Wind River Reservation communities and be able to identify these locations on a map.
Students will be able to further describe how their culture has shaped them.
Students will be able to define the concept of culture.
Students will be able to explain some of the attributes of culture.

Subject:
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/17/2019
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law
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The laws that govern and the social norms that regulate society are not always fair, legal, moral, or ethical. What is a person to do about all this injustice? What are the hazards of righting injustices or changing social norms? And what are the dangers of doing nothing?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate Antigone, “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” and Pygmalion.
Students write a literary analysis showing the effect of social class or the law on a character’s life.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How do social class and legal institutions shape literary characters’ lives (and presumably our lives)?
How does social class affect a person in dealing with the law (protect a person, hurt a person)?
How is social class determined in America and in other places in the world?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
Family Living Pathway
Conditions of Use:
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This course is for students who are interested in maintaining a healthy and happy lifestyle. This course will appeal to food and nutrition enthusiasts. The course is designed for students to understand the principles of food, nutrition, cooking skills, and how to understand finances. You will understand different topics such as healthy eating habits, food safety, cooking terms, balancing budgets, and other important things that will help you live your life on a daily basis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
06/01/2018
The Argumentative Research Project: A Step-by-Step Course
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This resource is designed to walk students through the process of completing a research project in any field of study. It covers the earliest stages of brainstorming and discussing, continues through researching and compiling sources; writing, documenting, revising, and polishing a paper; and finally presenting the research topic to a wider audience in a professional manner. The focus is on MLA format, though the course could be modified for other formats.

The first unit is an introduction to the project. It asks students to draw on knowledge of issues affecting their own community and world to help generate discussion that could eventually lead to a research topic.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Social Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Sara Layton
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Analyzing Arguments--Propaganda (Robbie Pock, Portland Community College)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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In this unit you will learn about the formal parts of an argument and how they work together. You will also learn about a common and not always honest way that people making arguments attempt to persuade their audiences, sometimes through manipulation.

This unit contains two lessons, a primary source reading, an information literacy activity, and a discussion activity.

This resource was created as part of a Developmental Reading course redesign project, with contributions from Theresa Love and David Pontious and support from an Open Oregon Educational Resources grant.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Amy Hofer
Robbie Pock
Date Added:
04/19/2016
The Crucible Unit
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This unit explores multiple themes in both the play The Crucible and real historical contexts in order to deepen our understanding of human nature while sharpening our literary analysis skills. As students read, heavy emphasis is placed on using textual evidence to support character and theme analysis. Students will also work on strengthening research skills. The summative assessment involves analyzing how a common theme can be seen during both the play and the McCarthy trials based on analysis of a variety of sources.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Margaret Murray
Date Added:
08/26/2019
Who are the Northern Arapaho?
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Students will gain an understanding of the Northern Arapaho people located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. In the accompanying lessons plans (found in the Support Materials), students will learn how the Northern Arapaho come to Wyoming, what are the Arapaho values, and why were Arapaho tribal names changed?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to evaluate what geographical places were used by the Arapaho people and understand how historical events changed the future for the Arapaho people.
Students will compare and contrast between their social and ceremonial structures.
Students will understand the hierarchy of the Arapaho Tribe.
Students will analyze how their social and ceremonial structures contribute to their cultural identity.

Subject:
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/17/2019
The American Dream
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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This lesson invites students to search and sift through rare print documents, early motion pictures, photographs, and recorded sounds from The Library of Congress. Students experience the depth and breadth of the digital resources of the Library, tell the story of a decade, and help define the American Dream.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
06/07/2000
English Language Arts, Grade 11
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016