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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.2
King andrew The First
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A caricature of Andrew Jackson as a despotic monarch, probably issued during the Fall of 1833 in response to the President's September order to remove federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. The print is dated a year earlier by Weitenkampf and related to Jackson's controversial veto of Congress's bill to recharter the Bank in July 1832. However, the charge, implicit in the print, of Jackson's exceeding the President's constitutional power, however, was most widely advanced in connection not with the veto but with the 1833 removal order, on which the President was strongly criticized for acting without congressional approval. Jackson, in regal costume, stands before a throne in a frontal pose reminiscent of a playing-card king. He holds a "veto" in his left hand and a scepter in his right. The Federal Constitution and the arms of Pennsylvania (the United States Bank was located in Philadelphia) lie in tatters under his feet. A book "Judiciary of the U[nited] States" lies nearby. Around the border of the print are the words "Of Veto Memory", "Born to Command" and "Had I Been Consulted." |Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf cites a variant with 20 lines of letterpress below, attacking Jackson as "a king who has placed himself above the law."|Weitenkampf, p. 26.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1833-4.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
5 To One Ha
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Another show of Northern optimism in the early months of the Lincoln administration. Uncle Sam approaches from the left holding a bayonet, causing five Southern soldiers to flee in panic to the right. In their haste to retreat the Confederates drop their flag, muskets, a hat, and a boot. A black child and two black men, one fiddling, watch with obvious glee from the background. Prominent in the center foreground are a mound marked "76" bearing an American flag and a crowing cock. In the background are the Capitol at Washington (left) and the palmetto trees of South Carolina (right).|Entered . . . by W. Wiswell . . . Ohio, June 8th 1861.|The Library's copy of the print is the copyright deposit impression.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 132.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-28.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
ISearch BINGO, Grades 6-8
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Remix and Share
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Objective: Using your school’s local version of ISearch, students will gather and cite information from multiple texts and diverse media and draw on information from multiple print or digital sources.Note: If students do not know what a primary source document is and why researchers use them, you may wish to tell them that primary source documents include letters, diaries, journals, interviews, transcripts, speeches, and pamphlets. Researchers and historians use them as first-hand accounts of something that happened at a certain point in time.Instructions: Use the ISearch BINGO card and one of the three worksheets to teach students how to use ISearch to find academic sources. Worksheet A introduces students to the ISearch interface. Worksheet B introduces students to the ISearch interface by comparing it with another search tool of your choosing. Worksheet C introduces students to the ISearch interface and requires students to cite sources correctly in an annotated bibliography.Distribute the ISearch BINGO Worksheet of your choosing (A, B, or C) for Grades 6-8.Encourage students to read all directions along with you first so you can help them understand.Demonstrate how to use ISearch to find sources and how to create citations or find citation helpers. See demo instructions.Pass out the BINGO cards. Explain how to get a BINGO. Tell students that they can choose any of the topics in the box as a search term when looking for that source. They can mix and match. In other words, a student can do a search for civil rights for B1 and suffrage for I6, or the student could do civil rights across the row.ModificationsEncourage students to work in teams to find the sources.Change the search terms in the BINGO card to relate to those with a current classroom assignment.Time Required: Activities in Worksheet A can be completed in 25-45 minutes. Activities in Worksheet B can be completed in 45-65 minutes. Activities in Worksheet C can be completed in 90 minutes.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Erica Clay
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Twelve Years a Slave: Analyzing Slave Narratives
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No Strings Attached
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The corrupting influence of slavery on marriage and the family is a predominant theme in Solomon Northup's narrative Twelve Years a Slave. In this lesson, students are asked to identify and analyze narrative passages that provide evidence for how slavery undermined and perverted these social institutions. Northup collaborated with a white ghostwriter, David Wilson. Students will read the preface and identify and analyze statements Wilson makes to prove the narrative is true.

Subject:
Literature
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
09/06/2019
The Globe-Man After Hearing of The Vote On The Sub-Treasury Bill
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Evidently a companion to "The Globe Man Listening to Webster's speech on the Specie Circular" (no. 1838-3), the small, bust-length caricature of Democratic editor Francis Preston Blair shows him looking even more cadaverous and morose. The title refers to the defeat of Van Buren's Independent Treasury Bill in 1838. The print was registered for copyright on July 6, 1838, soon after the bill was voted down late in the second session of the Twenty-fifth Congress.|Entd . . . 1838 by H.R. Robinson . . . Southn. Dist. of N.Y.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.|Probably drawn by Napoleon Sarony.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 54.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1838-4.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
General Jackson Slaying The Many Headed Monster
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A satire on Andrew Jackson's campaign to destroy the Bank of the United States and its support among state banks. Jackson, Martin Van Buren, and Jack Downing struggle against a snake with heads representing the states. Jackson (on the left) raises a cane marked "Veto" and says, "Biddle thou Monster Avaunt!! avaount I say! or by the Great Eternal I'll cleave thee to the earth, aye thee and thy four and twenty satellites. Matty if thou art true...come on. if thou art false, may the venomous monster turn his dire fang upon thee..." Van Buren: "Well done General, Major Jack Downing, Adams, Clay, well done all. I dislike dissentions beyond every thing, for it often compels a man to play a double part, were it only for his own safety. Policy, policy is my motto, but intrigues I cannot countenance." Downing (dropping his axe): "Now now you nasty varmint, be you imperishable? I swan Gineral that are beats all I reckon, that's the horrible wiper wot wommits wenemous heads I guess..." The largest of the heads is president of the Bank Nicholas Biddle's, which wears a top hat labeled "Penn" (i.e. Pennsylvania) and "$35,000,000." This refers to the rechartering of the Bank by the Pennsylvania legislature in defiance of the adminstration's efforts to destroy it.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf cites another version of the print issued by Robinson with the date 1836, and suggests that the present version is a reversed copy of that. One print with this title was registered for copyright by Robinson on March 29, 1836.|Weitenkampf, p. 39-40.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The (Fort) Monroe Doctrine
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On May 27, 1861, Benjamin Butler, commander of the Union army in Virginia and North Carolina, decreed that slaves who fled to Union lines were legitimate "contraband of war," and were not subject to return to their Confederate owners. The declaration precipitated scores of escapes to Union lines around Fortress Monroe, Butler's headquarters in Virginia. In this crudely drawn caricature, a slave stands before the Union fort taunting his plantation master. The planter (right) waves his whip and cries, "Come back you black rascal." The slave replies, "Can't come back nohow massa Dis chile's contraban." Hordes of other slaves are seen leaving the fields and heading toward the fort.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 126.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-37.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Fugitive's Song
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A sheet music cover illustrated with a portrait of prominent black abolitionist Frederick Douglass as a runaway slave. Douglass flees barefoot from two mounted pursuers who appear across the river behind him with their pack of dogs. Ahead, to the right, a signpost points toward New England. The cover's text states that "The Fugitive's Song" was "composed and respectfully dedicated, in token of confident esteem to Frederick Douglass. A graduate from the peculiar institution. For his fearless advocacy, signal ability and wonderful success in behalf of his brothers in bonds. (and to the fugitives from slavery in the) free states & Canadas by their friend Jesse Hutchinson Junr." As the illustration suggests, Douglass himself had escaped from slavery, fleeing in 1838 from Maryland to Massachusetts. He achieved considerable renown for his autobiography "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass," first published in 1845. The Library's copy of "The Fugitive's Song" was deposited for copyright on July 23, 1845. An earlier abolitionist song composed by Hutchinson, "Get Off the Track!" (no. 1844-14), also used a cover illustration to amplify its message.|Boston. Published by Henry Prentiss 33 Court St.|Entered . . . 1845 by Henry Prentiss.|Lith. of E.W. Bouve Boston.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1845-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Downfall of Mother Bank
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A pro-Jackson satire applauding the President's September 1833 order for the removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. The combined opposition to this move from Bank president Nicholas Biddle, Senate Whigs led by Daniel Webster and Henry Clay, and the pro-Bank press are ridiculed. On the right, Jackson, cheered on by Major Jack Downing, holds aloft an "Order for the Removal of Public Money." Jackson: "Major Jack Downing. I must act in this case with energy and decision, you see the downfall of the party engine and corrupt monopoly!!" Downing: "Hurrah! General! if this don't beat skunkin, I'm a nigger, only see that varmint Nick how spry he is, he runs along like a Weatherfield Hog with an onion in his mouth." From the document emanate lightning bolts which topple the columns and pediment of the Bank, which crash down amidst fleeing public figures and Whig editors. Around them are strewn various newspapers and sheets with "Salary $6,000" and "Printing expenses "$80,000" printed on them. Henry Clay (at left, fallen): "Help me up! Webster! or I shall lose my stakes." Daniel Webster (far left): "There is a tide in the affairs of men, as Shakespeare says, so my dear CLay, look out for yourself." Nicholas Biddle, with the head and hoofs of an ass or demon, runs to the left: "It is time for me to resign my presidency." Two men flee with sacks of "fees." These fugitives may be newspaper editors Mordecai Manuel Noah and James Watson Webb, advocates of the Bank accused of being in the employ of Biddle.|Draw'd off from Natur by Zek. Downing, Neffu to Major Jack Downing.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N. York.|The print appears to be a reversed copy of a work of the same title by Edward Williams Clay, deposited for copyright in the New York District Court on October 5, 1833. Weitenkampf and Davison both list the Clay version.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Century, p. 40. |Davison, no. 62.|Murrell, p. 127.|Weitenkampf, p. 29.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1833-9.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Capitol Fashions For 1837
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A caricature of President Martin Van Buren issued during the Panic of 1837, strongly critical of his continuation of predecessor Andrew Jackson's hard-money policies. Particular reference is made to the Specie Circular, a highly unpopular order issued by the Jackson administration in December 1836, directing collectors of public revenues to accept only gold or silver (i.e., "specie") in payment for public lands. Designed to curb speculation, the measure was blamed by administration critics for draining the economy of hard money and precipitating the 1837 crisis. Hearkening back to the anti-Jackson "King Andrew the First" (no. 1833-4), the artist portrays Van Buren as a monarch in a princely cloak, treading on the Constitution. He is crowned "in the name of Belzebub . . . Ragamuffin king" by a demon. Van Buren's cloak is trimmed with "shinplasters," the colloquial term for the often worthless small-denomination bank notes which proliferated during the panic. Van Buren says, "I like this cloak amazingly, for now I shall be able to put into execution my Designs without being observed by every quizing, prying Whig. I'm obliged to keep close since my Safety Fund is blown . . ." Under the Safety Fund law, passed during Van Buren's term as governor of New York, banks were required to contribute to a fund used to liquidate the obligations of banks that failed. The fund was quickly exhausted during the panic. On the walls are pictures of "Bequests of the Late Incumbent" (Andrew Jackson), including "The Hickory Stick," worshipped by the masses like the brazen serpent in the Old Testament, Jackson's spectacles and clay pipe, his hat, the Safety Fund balloon in flames, and "the Last Gold Coin," minted in 1829 (the year Jackson first took office). On the wall at right is a headless statue of Jackson holding a "veto" in his right hand (an allusion to Jackson's 1832 veto of a bill to recharter the Bank of the United States). Visible through a window is a street scene where a crowd mobs a theater exhibiting "a Real Gold Coin." Beneath Van Buren's feet are several documents, including the Specie Circular and "petitions," the missives from New York bankers and merchants which deluged the White House calling for repeal of the Circular. A document labeled "Indian claims" refers to another unpopular Jackson legacy: the numerous grievances by tribes like the Cherokees and Seminoles regarding unfair and inhumane government treaties by which they were being displaced and deprived of their lands.|Copyright secured according to law by F.J. Winston.|Published at 89 Nassau St. NY.|Signed: Forbes Delt.|The Library's impression of the print was deposited for copyright on August 29, 1837, and published at the same address as Anthony Fleetwood's "6 Cents. Humbug Glory Bank" (no. 1837-10).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 49.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Commander-In-Chief Conciliating The Soldier's Votes On The Battle Field
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A bitterly anti-Lincoln cartoon, based on slanderous newspaper reports of the President's callous disregard of the misery of Union troops at the front. The story that Lincoln had joked on the field at Antietam appeared in the "New York World." Holding a plaid Scotch cap (see "Abraham's Dream--"Coming Events Cast Their Shadows Before,"" no. 1864-42), Lincoln stands on the battlefield at Antietam, which is littered with Union dead and wounded. He instructs his friend Marshal Lamon, who stands with his back toward the viewer and his hand over his face, to "sing us PĚ_Ąicayune Butler,' or something else that's funny."|Signed with monogram: CAL?|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Century, p. 110-111.|Lorant, p. 263.|Weitenkampf, p. 141.|Wilson, p. 292-293.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-30.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Democracy. 1832. 1864.
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Two scenes contrast Democratic presidential candidate of 1832 Andrew Jackson and 1864 George B. McClellan. McClellan is portrayed as weak and conciliatory toward the South, whereas his earlier counterpart's staunch preservation of the Union is applauded. In the left panel Jackson berates John C. Calhoun, leader of the Southern nullification effort of 1832. Jackson vows, "By the Eternal! this Union must and shall be preserved: A Traitor's doom to him who acts against it." Calhoun bows deeply in response, pleading, "Pardon! Pardon!" Three men in the background also bow. The South Carolinean Calhoun was a longtime exponent of Southern autonomy. On the right McClellan and running mate Pendleton kneel on the "Chicago Platform" before a standing Jefferson Davis. Davis addresses them, "Gentlemen, I am well pleased with what you ask for, you are men of sense, and to commence with I wish you to call back those fellows, Sherman, Grant and Sheridan also that old Seadog Farragut after that we will see further." The men mentioned are Union generals William T. Sherman, Ulysses S. Grant, and Philip H. Sheridan and Union admiral David G. Farragut. McClellan, who ran on a "peace at any price" plank, offers an olive branch to Davis, begging, "We should like to have Union and Peace dear Mr. Davis but if such is not your pleasure then please state your terms for a friendly separation." Pendleton, behind him, says, "Amen." At the far left a Confederate soldier comments, "Those Northern dogs how they whine!" Beside him another soldier gnaws a corn cob.|Entered . . . 1864 by L. Prang & Co. . . . Mass.|Published by Louis Prang & Co. 159 Washington St. Boston.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Murrell, p. 225.|Weitenkampf, p. 143.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-24.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Federal-Abolition-Whig Trap, To Catch Voters In
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An illustrated anti-Whig broadside, designed to combat the "Log Cabin campaign" tactics of presidential candidate William Henry Harrison. The text warns the people of New Orleans of Whig election propaganda: "People of Louisiana, above you have an accurate representation of the federal "Log-Cabin" Trap, invented by the "bank-parlor, Ruffle-shirt, silk-stocking" Gentry, for catching the "votes" of the industrious and laboring classes, of our citizens, of both town and country. . . . The "log cabin" is raised to blind you with the belief, that they are your friends . . ." The author then goes on to describe Whig campaign techniques as relying on deception, alcohol, and visual enticements, and as an "appeal to [the people's] passions, with mockeries, humbugs, shows, and parades. . . ." In the illustration a man sucks at a barrel of "Hard Cider" linked by a trip-rod to a precariously tilted log cabin. Above is the "Federal Bank Whig Motto. We Stoop to Conquer."|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-24.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
A Globe To Live On!
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Prominent Democratic party publicists Francis Preston Blair and Amos Kendall are portrayed as Siamese twins, joined at the mid-section, and standing on a large globe. Blair (left) was the influential editor of the Washington "Globe" newspaper. Kendall resigned his cabinet post as postmaster general on May 16, 1840, to undertake editing of the "Extra Globe," a party organ issued during the presidential campaign. The "Extra" is the ligament that joins him and Blair in Sarony's cartoon. Blair exclaims, "Amos: You are an Atlas! and can support the Globe!" Kendall replies, "Yes! Frank, and "can" make the Globe support me." The latter's confirms the widespread rumor that Kendall shared considerably in the campaign paper's profits. He holds in his left hand a paper with the words "List of Subscribers 100,000 Office Holders." Kendall used thousands of federal postmasters to distribute the "Extra Globe." Whigs also maintained that some 100,000 public employees were forced to contribute a portion of their salaries to support the campaign.|Printed & published by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. & Pennsa. Avenue Washington D.C. (imprint supplied by Weitenkampf).|Signed: N.S. (with logo of a barrel; Napoleon Sarony]|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 61.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-42.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Great Naval Blockade of Round Island. Showing The Immense Importance of Having An Efficient "right Arm of The National Defence"
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A satire on Taylor administration efforts to curtail American "filibusters," armed expeditions against Cuba for the purpose of freeing the island from Spanish rule. Specific reference here is to the Navy's blockade of one such expeditionary force, which assembled on Round Island under Colonel G. W. White in early September 1849. The many puzzling references in the dialogue and imagery here aside, it is clear that the artist is also poking fun at the expansionist dreams of Americans of the time who advocated annexation of Cuba, Canada, and even parts of South America. The artist is critical as well of the current Cuban regime. On the shore of Round Island, the would-be invaders sit at a long rustic banquet table. Nearby several youths play with marbles and hoops, while two boys and a man ride a seesaw. Beyond, two men fly star-shaped kites which read "Cuba" and "Canada." The table is set with food, apparently taken from two large baskets at right. Several of the banqueters toast, "The Queen of Slave Traders!" "The Republic of Sierra Madre!" and "Venezuela! St Domingo! and Yucatan!" A man at the head of the table, holding a "N.Y. Express Proclamation" (perhaps Zachary Taylor's 1848 proclamation denouncing the expedition) addresses them, "You should thank us ye Pirates and Robbers of Cuba for saving you from [Spanish governor of Cuba Federico] Roncali's Garrote." One of the diners protests, "We are no Pirates! we dont kidnap people from the United States nor from Africa" (a reference to the Cuban government's alleged abduction of Juan Francisco Garcia y Rey from New Orleans in July 1848 and to Cuba's slave trade). Offshore are several boats, including a U.S. naval frigate with the words "Nine Millions a year" emblazoned on its sail and a small sloop. A man in the sloop calls out to the frigate, "Help! Help! dont let Roncali trample on your laws." The man is former Havana jailer Juan Francisco Garcia y Rey, now held by the Spanish government for freeing Cuban revolutionaries. Garcia y Rey had appealed for help to the American government, on the basis of his illegal abduction by the Spanish consul. To his call comes the response, "We dont care for the laws we are reaping laurels. Mr. Rey." Others on deck on the American ship converse, saying, "This is as safe and more glorious than Tampico" and "La Cronica will let the Negroes loose upon those who escape from the proclamation."|Probably published in New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 100.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1849-5.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Going To Texas After The Election of 1844
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A comic scene anticipating a Whig victory in the upcoming presidential election. The date is 1845, after an election supposedly decided on the Texas question, the tariff issue, and Democratic identification with Jacksonian policies. The artist ridicules Democrat James K. Polk's advocacy of the annexation of Texas as misguided aggression. In addition, the title's use of the phrase "Going to Texas," contemporary code for embezzling, may be a swipe at the political spoils system associated with the Democrats since the Jackson administration. Incumbent President John Tyler also comes under attack for corruption. The scene is outside the White House. On a "Loco Foco" donkey Polk and running-mate Dallas, heavily armed and equipped with military packs, are about to depart for Texas. Dallas holds a flag with skull-and-crossbones and the motto "Free Trade," a symbol of antiprotectionism. Around the donkey's neck is a feed barrel full of "Poke berries." Before the donkey stands Andrew Jackson, offering his trademark hat and clay pipe, and crooning: I give thee all, I can no more, / Though poor the offering be, / My hat and Pipe are all the store, / That I can bring to thee! / A hat whose worn out nap reveals / A friendly tale full well, / And better far a heart that feels, / More than Hat and Pipe can tell! At this the donkey brays, "Eehaw!" and Polk bids Jackson, "Goodbye General! It is all day with us. I am a gone Sucker!" Dallas exclaims, "D--n Clay!" Behind the donkey stands John Tyler, with lowered head, reflecting, "It is very odd, that after all my treachery, and the unscrupulous efforts of office holders and political dependents, this is my reward! If I had not laid by enough for a rainy day, I should slope for Texas too!" On the ground nearby lies a sign reading: For Sale A lot of hickory Poles will be sold cheap to close the concern. enquire of Polk & Dallas." From the steps of the White House Henry Clay waves and calls out, "A pleasant journey to you Gentlemen! may your shadows never be less!" Below the title is a narrative, purportedly excerpted from the Tyler administration organ the "Madisonian" of April 1845: All wept particularly when the old chieftain approached and holding his hat and pipe in one hand and the other placed on his heart, with tremulous accent interrupted occasionally with a cough, sang the above lines, an impromptu composed by himself to the well known tune of my heart and Lute, even the sagacious Tyler was subdued and sank into a fit of melancholy abstraction; the Donkey brayed encore.|Entered . . . 1844 by J. Baillie.|Lithd. & pubd. by James Baillie 118 Nassau St. N.Y.|Signed with initials: E.W.C. (Edward Williams Clay).|The print probably appeared late in the campaign, as the Library's impression was deposited for copyright on October 22, 1844.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 83.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-47.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Grand Match Between The Kinderhook Poney and The Ohio Ploughman
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A satire on the presidential contest of 1836, using the metaphor of a billiards game between Whig candidate William Henry Harrison (left) and Democrat Martin Van Buren. The artist is clearly on the side of Harrison, whom he places beneath a portrait of George Washington, in opposition to Van Buren's perceived mentor and champion Andrew Jackson who stands at the far end of the table, below a painting of Napoleon. Behind the table stand Whig Senators Daniel Webster and Henry Clay, arm-in-arm near Harrison. Next to Van Buren (holding a cue) stands a sixth man, either Secretary of the Treasury Levi Woodbury or (as Weitenkampf suggests) Van Buren ally Senator Thomas Hart Benton. Harrison: "Now for a six stroke." Webster: "Now's your chance Harrison. There is a tide in the affairs of men as Shakespear says." Clay: "I'll go a cool Hundred Harrison wins the game." Sixth man: "I'll bet a cookie he don't make the hazzard." Jackson (holding what appears to be a bridge): "By the Eternal! Martin if Harrison holes you and gets a spot ball on the deep red it is all day with you." Van Buren: "He's more likely to hole himself General!"|Entered . . . 1836 by H.R. Robinson.|Published April 1836, by the proprietor H.R. Robinson, 48 Cortlandt St. New-York.|Signed with monogram: C (Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 44.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-14.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Going Up Salt River
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Political cartoons friendly to Van Buren were the rare exception during the 1840 campaign. Here the artist parodies the exploitation by Whig politicians of populist candidate William Henry Harrison. Martin Van Buren stands on the bank of a stream wishing the Harrison party "a quick voyage, take care you dont spill your valuable cargo." Harrison appears as a donkey wading in the shallows with a barrel of "Hard Cider" tied to its tail, carrying senators Henry Clay and Daniel Webster and Virginia representative Henry A. Wise on his back. Harrison: "I feel very much like a donkey!" Webster: "I say Wise do you think we have enough hard cider to last us to the Hedd of Navigation!" Wise: "Oh Webster dont be frightened we have plenty lashed on to the stern. What say you Clay!" Clay: "I'm content!" The image is clumsily drawn, but otherwise resembles Edward Williams Clay's work. There may have been some use of transfer paper in the lithographic process.|Drawn by Edward Williams Clay?|Published by John Childs, 90 Nassau St. New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 67.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-49.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Grand Set To Between Rough and Ready and Genal. Gas
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Zachary Taylor and Lewis Cass engage in a bout of fisticuffs in their battle for the presidency in 1848. Taylor, clearly getting the better of his opponent, seizes Cass by the lapels saying, "A little more grape! Gen"al" Gas!" Cass pleads, "Enough! Enough! you've knocked all the breath out of my body--Carry me off Old Bullion!" His appeal for help is to conservative Democratic senator Thomas Hart Benton, who stands to the left wondering, "I didn't think old Gas would have funked so soon; these d--d Barnburners must have frightened his pluck out of him." One of the "Barnburners" (i.e., radical Democrats), former President Martin Van Buren (far left), comments, "If old Gas comes round in my neighborhood I'll give a poke that will soon settle his hash." On the far right stands Henry Clay, who lost the Whig nomination to Taylor. His aside: "As I couldn't get the match myself I am glad Old Rough and Ready has got it."|Published by J. Dexter & Brother 32 Ann St. N.Y.|Probably drawn by Edward Williams Clay.|The Library has two impressions of the print, both printed on the verso of "The Race between Bennett and Greely for the Post-Office Stakes" (no. 1843-4).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 91.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-31.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013