Political Science Textbooks and Full Courses

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Political Science Textbooks and Full Courses Collection Resources (71)

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21st Century American Government and Politics  v.1.0
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Textbook focusing on American Government and the specificities of the American political system. In covering American government and politics, this text:
• introduces the intricacies of the Constitution, the complexities of federalism, the meanings of civil liberties, and the conflicts over civil rights;
• explains how people are socialized to politics, acquire and express opinions, and participate in political life;
• describes interest groups, political parties, and elections—the intermediaries that link people to government and politics;
• details the branches of government and how they operate; and
• shows how policies are made and affect people’s lives.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
David L. Paletz
Diana Owen
Timothy E. Cook
Date Added:
12/29/2012
AIDS and Poverty in Africa, Spring 2005
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This is a discussion-based interactive seminar on the two major issues that affect Sub-Saharan Africa: HIV/AIDS and Poverty. AIDS and Poverty, seemingly different concepts, are more inter-related to each other in Africa than in any other continent. As MIT students, we feel it is important to engage ourselves in a dynamic discussion on the relation between the two - how to fight one and how to solve the other.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bobbili, Raja
Date Added:
01/01/2005
African Politics
Conditions of Use:
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This course will provide the student with a broad overview of African politics placed within the context of Africa's recent history, taking into account Africa's colonial relationships and then the post-colonial period. This course will analyze on the internal workings and challenges of African states, including their movements towards democratization, their economic statuses, the connections between their governmental and non-governmental institutions/organizations, and the various ways in which their societies and cultures impact their politics. This course also asks questions about the nature of Africa's conflicts, reviewing larger trends within Africa's political economy, and inquiring about the promise of continental and sub-continental political integration efforts. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how colonialism and independence movements contributed to and shaped contemporary African statehood; identify the main causes of state and political failure in Africa; define underdevelopment and explain the causes of economic failure in Africa; discuss the causes of civil and interstate conflict in Africa; apply knowledge of Africa's history to explain current causes of crisis and the roles of different actors within the state and international community; compare and contrast economically and politically stable states with those that are unstable and identify the main features of stability; identify and explain some of the major social, cultural, and economic challenges (such as HIV/AIDS) that contemporary African states face, as well as the role international actors play in addressing these challenges. (Political Science 325)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
American Government
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
Glen Krutz
Sylvie Waskiewicz
Date Added:
08/23/2017
American Government
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Social Science
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
American Government (POLS 202)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This course covers American Government: the Constitution, the branches of government (Presidency, Congress, Judiciary) and how politics works: elections, voting, parties, campaigning, policy making. In addition weęll look at how the media, interest groups, public opinion polls and political self-identification (are you liberal or conservative, Democrat or Republican or something else?) impact politics and political choices. Weęll also cover the basics in economic, social and foreign policy and bring in current issues and show how they illustrate the process.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
American Government and Politics in the Information Age
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This text is a comprehensive introduction to the vital subject of American government and politics. Governments decide who gets what, when, how (See Harold D. Lasswell, Politics: Who Gets What, When, How, [New York: McGraw-Hill, 1936]); they make policies and pass laws that are binding on all a society’s members; they decide about taxation and spending, benefits and costs, even life and death.Governments possess power—the ability to gain compliance and to get people under their jurisdiction to obey them—and they may exercise their power by using the police and military to enforce their decisions. However, power need not involve the exercise of force or compulsion; people often obey because they think it is in their interest to do so, they have no reason to disobey, or they fear punishment. Above all, people obey their government because it has authority; its power is seen by people as rightfully held, as legitimate. People can grant their government legitimacy because they have been socialized to do so; because there are processes, such as elections, that enable them to choose and change their rulers; and because they believe that their governing institutions operate justly.Politics is the process by which leaders are selected and policy decisions are made and executed. It involves people and groups, both inside and outside of government, engaged in deliberation and debate, disagreement and conflict, cooperation and consensus, and power struggles.In covering American government and politics, this text introduces the intricacies of the Constitution, the complexities of federalism, the meanings of civil liberties, and the conflicts over civil rights;explains how people are socialized to politics, acquire and express opinions, and participate in political life; describes interest groups, political parties, and elections—the intermediaries that link people to government and politics; details the branches of government and how they operate; and shows how policies are made and affect people’s lives.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
Open Textbook Library
Author:
David L. Paletz
Diana Owen
Timothy E. Cook
Date Added:
06/06/2011
American Political Thought
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will cover American political thought from the nation's founding through the 1960s, exploring the political theories that have shaped its governance. As there is no one philosopher or idea that represents the totality of American political thought, the student will survey the writings and speeches of those who have had the greatest impact over this period of time. Much of the study required in this course is based on the original texts and speeches of those who influenced political thought throughout American history. The student will learn and understand the impact that their views and actions have had on the modern American state. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the religious and political origins of the American political system; explain how Enlightenment thinkers, such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Baron de Montesquieu, influenced the political philosophies of American founding fathers; analyze how the colonial American experience shaped many of the core values represented in American government and expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution; compare and contrast the differing opinions on the role of the government that the founders expressed; trace the development and evolution of the concepts of 'states rights' and 'federal (national) supremacy'; connect the observations of De Tocqueville in Democracy in America to the concepts of equality, individuality, and civic engagement in American political discourse; examine the evolution of race in the American political system (from slavery to the 2008 election of Barack Obama); discuss the changes in the political role of women in America from its colonial days to the present; connect the concept of 'American Exceptionalism' to the industrial revolution, capitalism, and imperialism; analyze the roots of reform in the Progressive Era and their impact on modern political discourse; explain major principles of American foreign relations over time; assess the purpose and impact of ĺÎĺĺĺŤAmerican war rhetoricĄ_ĺĺö over time; differentiate between 'liberal' and 'conservative' political beliefs in modern American government; illustrate how the political turmoil in the 1960s greatly shaped contemporary American political discourse; evaluate the current political discourse as represented in the 2008 and 2010 elections. (Political Science 301)

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
American Political Thought, Spring 2004
Conditions of Use:
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This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Song, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Asia-Pacific Politics
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the international relations of the Asia-Pacific region. Globalization, economic ties, national security issues, and politico-military alliances with the U.S. make an understanding of this region important to any political science student or participant in American government. This course will examine the differences between Western political thought and the general philosophical outlooks of the Asian population, which have been molded by societal forces for thousands of years. It will also address politics in Asia by examining pre-colonial systems of government, Western imperialism, national liberation movements, and proxy wars fought by the Superpowers in the Cold War. This course is important because the Asia-Pacific has given rise to several of the U.S.'s major security concerns: financial support of the U.S. economy by China and Japan through the purchase of U.S. government debt securities, conflict with China over Taiwan, North Korea's nuclear weapons program, separatist movements in several of the smaller Pacific Rim nations, and the growth and support of transnational terrorism within the region. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how religion and culture impact government and political systems in Eastern Asia; discuss philosophies of government in Eastern Asia from ancient times to the present; identify the ways in which Western imperialism has impacted Eastern Asia; demonstrate an understanding of systems of governance currently in existence in Eastern Asia; analyze contemporary political and security issues in Eastern Asia that may impact U.S. national interests; assess the relationship that exists between economic development, systems of governance, and political stability of a Third World nation. (Political Science 322)

Subject:
Philosophy
World Cultures
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Boundless Political Science Hub
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Access world-class Political Science content based on college intro-level Political Science content. Boundless Political Science readings, quizzes, and PowerPoints ae free to edit, share, and use in your class.Includes chapters on American Politics, The Constitution, Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, Public Opinion, Interest Groups, Campaigns and Elections, Voting, Branches of Government, and Policy.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Boundless
Date Added:
05/17/2017
Campaigns and Elections
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this course, the student will explore campaigns and elections, learning their purpose and significance and observing the impact that they have on the American political system. The course will focus on the history and evolution of elections and voting laws in the United States, as well as what compels individuals to run for office and how campaigns are structured. Also, the course will teach the student the role that political parties, interest groups, voters, and the media play in elections. Lastly, the student will take a closer look at electoral outcomes and the impact that elections have on public policy after votes are counted, as well as what types of proposals could be implemented to improve our electoral system. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain the importance of elections, voting, democracy, and citizenship in the United States; describe the various types of elections that exist within the American political system; identify the legal and constitutional bases of campaigns and elections in the United States; explain the types of individuals that run for political office and why; analyze the influence of incumbency in elections; explain how candidates develop campaigns and financing; discuss the role of money in political campaigns; discuss the influence of political parties on campaigns and elections; describe the characteristics of the U.S. party system; explain the role of interest groups in influence campaigns and election outcomes; explain the various influences and motivations of the American voter; describe the factors associated with both nonvoter and voter disenfranchisement in contemporary elections; analyze and explain the critical role of the media in campaigns and elections; explain how election outcomes impact government actions and public policy; analyze both historical and contemporary election reforms. (POLSC333)

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Capitalism and Political Economy
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This course is an introduction to economics for non-majors and political economy, with an emphasis on the moral and ethical problems that markets solve, and fail to solve. Taught by Professor Michael Munger of Duke University, this course includes full length lectures, links to readings, and a sample final exam.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Michael Munger
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Civil War, Spring 2010
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This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. Students will study the origins of civil war, discuss variables that affect the duration of civil war, and examine the termination of conflict. This course is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Petersen, Roger
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Congressional Politics
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this course, the student will learn about the complexities of the legislative branch by examining the U.S. Congress in the American political system. This course will focus first on the history of Congress and the tension between Congress' competing representation and lawmaking functions by examining the structure of Congress, its original purpose, and the factors that influence how members of Congress act. The course will then take a careful look at the internal politics and law-making processes of Congress by learning the external competing interests that shape legislative outcomes and why Congressional rules are designed as they are. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how Congress was structured by the Framers of the Constitution; discuss how Congress is shaped by the U.S. Constitution; demonstrate an understanding of the importance of bicameralism in a representative body; compare and contrast features of the House and the Senate; explain the evolution of Congress as a modern institution; explain how congressional candidates run for office; discuss the importance of political parties in the recruitment of congressional candidates; identify the advantages and disadvantages of incumbency; define reapportionment and redistricting; assess the role of money and fundraising in congressional elections; compare and contrast how members of Congress fulfill their duties in their home districts and in Washington D.C; compare and contrast the leadership systems used in the House and Senate; describe the roles and functions of legislative leaders and political parties in Congress; name and describe the various types of congressional committees; explain why the committee system is central to an understanding of the legislative process; describe the major steps in a bill becoming a law; evaluate the influence of constituents, colleagues, political parties, and interest groups on congressional decision-making; assess the relationship between Congress and the president and its many permutations over time; analyze the pros and cons of united and divided government; explain the influence of the presidency on congressional elections; discuss the role of congressional oversight as it relates to both the presidency and the bureaucracy; identify the role played by Congress as it relates to the judicial branch; analyze the complicated relationship that exists between members of Congress and the media; analyze the role and performance of Congress in the budgetary process, economic policy, and foreign policy; explain the complications that arise as a result of shared foreign policy powers between Congress and the president; discuss how congressional policymaking has responded to post-9/11 governance; discuss the criticism of Congress, and assess the methods put forth to reform the institution. (Political Science 331)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Contemporary Political Thought
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the major political theorists and their work from the 18th century to the present. Common themes seen in contemporary political thought include governance, property ownership and redistribution, free enterprise, individual liberty, justice, and responsibility for the common welfare. The student will read the works of theorists advocating capitalism, socialism, communism, egalitarianism, utilitarianism, social contract theory, liberalism, conservatism, neo-liberalism, neo-conservatism, libertarianism, fascism, anarchy, rational choice theory, and globalism. By studying the evolving constructs of political theory in the past two centuries, the student will gain insight into different approaches that leaders use to solve complex problems of governance and maintenance of social order. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: summarize the primary principles of capitalism, socialism, communism, egalitarianism, utilitarianism, social contract theory, liberalism, conservatism, neo-liberalism, neo-conservatism, libertarianism, fascism, anarchy, terrorism, rational choice theory, and globalism; identify major the political theorists from the 188h century to the present; discuss major political movements in their respective historical contexts; assess the impact that various political movements have had on law, economics, international relations, and society; analyze various primary sources of political theory and understand how these theories can be applied to solve problems in society; understand the challenges that modern leaders face in framing political debate and public policy. (Political Science 302)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity, Spring 2012
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What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tobie Weiner
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Cyberpolitics in International Relations: Theory, Methods, Policy, Fall 2011
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This course focuses on cyberspace and its implications for private and public, sub-national, national, and international actors and entities.

Subject:
Information Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
David D. Clark
Nazli Choucri
Stuart Madnick
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Democracy in Brief
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Democracy in Brief touches on topics such as rights and responsibilities of citizens, free and fair elections, the rule of law, the role of a written constitution, separation of powers, a free media, the role of parties and interest groups, military-civilian relations and democratic culture.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Faculty Reviewed Open Textbooks
Author:
United States Department of State Bureau of International Information Programs
Date Added:
10/28/2014
Demokratischer Staat und transnationaler: Terrorismus Drei Wege zur Unnachgiebigkeit in Westeuropa 1972-1975
Rating

Nicht erst die Epoche nach "9/11", sondern schon die 1970er Jahre waren eine Ära des grenzenlosen Terrorismus. Mehrmals hielten transnational vernetzte und operierende Terroristen die Regierungen und die Öffentlichkeit in Westeuropa durch Geiselnahmen in Atem. Besonders spektakulär waren das Olympia-Attentat von München (1972), die OPEC-Geiselnahme in Wien (1975) sowie die Molukkeranschläge in Den Haag, Beilen und Amsterdam (1974/75). Wie reagierten die betroffenen Staaten auf diese neue Herausforderung, in der die Grenzen zwischen innerer Sicherheit und Außenpolitik verschwammen?
Matthias Dahlke zeigt anhand erstmals ausgewerteter Dokumente, wie drei verschiedene westeuropäische Regierungen auf unterschiedlichen Wegen zum Grundsatz der Unnachgiebigkeit gelangten, zugleich aber auch Geheimabsprachen mit Terroristen nicht scheuten. Der transnationale und vergleichende Ansatz, der die gesamtgesellschaftlichen Prozesse einbezieht, ermöglicht eine neue Sicht auf die europäische Geschichte der Auseinandersetzung zwischen Staat und Terrorismus.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
De Gruyter
Author:
Matthias Dahlke
Date Added:
01/16/2018
Development Economics: Macroeconomics Spring 2013
Conditions of Use:
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This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets.

At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kremer, Michael
Townsend, Robert
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Economic Development
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The phrase 'economic development' generally refers not only to economic growth, but to changes in the ways in which goods and services are produced in a country as well as improvements in inhabitants' quality of life. Theories of economic development attempt to explain the social, political, and economic processes that countries go through as they transition from being what are known as 'Less Developed Countries' (LDCs) to being 'Developed Countries' (DCs). In this course, the student will discover how various theories explain development success and failure in the real world. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Define economic development and its components; Describe major theories of economic development; Understand some simple economic models related to economic development and economic growth, including the Solow Growth model and its extensions; Place economic development theories in the social and political context in which they were created; Critically examine economic development theories in light of a history of poor performance in development programs. (Economics 304)

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/18/2011
Elements of Political Communication
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This style guide is an introductory wikibook for beginners who want to produce political messages in various media formats. It is not a rule book; rather, it is a set of guidelines to facilitate effective political communication. Its purpose is to bridge the gap between two distinct styles to create pragmatic, clear, and useful information to establish a consistent tone, style, and format between all of the messages you or your organization produces.

It is meant as a practical guide for anyone, regardless of political affiliation, and it is organized in such a way that a person new to political communication can learn to create convincing and thought-provoking op-eds, letters to the editor, press releases, social media posts, website content, and spoken messages.

Subject:
Communication
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
05/13/2016
Ethics and Public Policy
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will provide the student with an overview of the role that ethical, cultural, religious, and moral principles play in public policy. The course will introduce the student to common themes found in the foundational theories of ethics and morality in politics such as justice, equality, fairness, individual liberty, free enterprise, charity, fundamental human rights, and minimizing harm to others. These themes are integrated into various decision-making models that you will learn about. Students will examine five types of decision frameworks used to make and implement public policy, as well as rationales used to justify inequitable impact and outcomes of policies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain how personal morality and ethics impact the policymaking process; discuss various ethical frameworks used to resolve policy dilemmas; identify statutes, ethical codes, and legal opinions that define the normative parameters of key domestic and international policy issues; assess the impact that public interest groups have on policymaking and execution of policies. (Political Science 401)

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
European Politics
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will examine European politics, specifically analyzing its process of integration into a supranational entity: the European Union. It will teach the student about key historical events and trends, why Europe is unique, and possible scenarios for Europe's future. It will examine the sovereign state system that emerged from the Wars of Religion, the intricacies of the European Union in the post-World War II environment, major states that make up the EU or play a key role in European politics, and many important contemporary issues that the EU and Europe face. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the emergence of modern Europe and the challenge of competing European nationalisms and nation states to European peace and prosperity; describe the emergence of the post World War II European peace project that has taken primary form in the development of the contemporary institutions of the European Union while addressing the public and foreign policy issue areas of primary concern to Europeans, including economic, development, and security issues; assess the challenges confronting traditional national state identity among the political communities of West Europe since World War II, which has gained renewed focus with the end of the Cold War and the re-emergence of the question of the relationship of Western Europe to Eastern Europe; analyze the international and national public policy challenges that continue to determine both the policy agenda within the European Union and the institutional evolution of the European Union to meet these challenges. (Political Science 323)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
European Politics, Fall 2011
Conditions of Use:
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This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kathleen Thelen
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Feminist Politics
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Throughout the course, we will examine and discuss questions important to feminist politics, such as citizenship, political participation, and political rights; work and family; reproductive rights and birth control; gender representation in the media; and finally, the role of gender in militarism and national security. In considering each topic, we will draw on historical analysis and seek to consider the variety of womenĺÎĺs experiences. Though this course will focus on feminism in the U.S., we will also attempt to incorporate international perspectives on women and feminism.

Subject:
Political Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
08/28/2013
Field Seminar: International Relations Theory, Fall 2011
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This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
M. Taylor Fravel
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Forms of Political Participation: Old and New, Spring 2005
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How and why do we participate in public life? How do we get drawn into community and political affairs? In this course we examine the associations and networks that connect us to one another and structure our social and political interactions. Readings are drawn from a growing body of research suggesting that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities represented by the concepts of civil society and social capital can have important effects on the functioning of democracy, stability and change in political regimes, the capacity of states to carry out their objectives, and international politics.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lily
Tsai
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Foundations of Political Science, Fall 2004
Conditions of Use:
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This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science. introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second (taught this year by Roger Petersen) focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After Hegemony, Allison and Zelikow, The Essence of Decision, and Doyle, "Kant, Liberal Legacies, and Foreign Affairs."

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cohen, Joshua
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Global Justice
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Detailed exploration of contemporary debates and controversies regarding global justice. Topics include: human rights theory, the moral significance of national and cultural boundaries, the currency of distributive justice, global inequality and poverty, environmental devastation, and violence against women and children.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
08/28/2013
Great Power Military Intervention, Fall 2013
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power.

Subject:
Journalism
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Peterson, Roger
Posen, Barry
Date Added:
01/01/2013
History of Economic Ideas
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The history of economic thought represents a wide diversity of theories within the discipline, but all economists address these three basic questions: what to produce, how to produce it, and for whom. The student will learn that without a clear sense of the discussions and debates that took place among economists of the past, the modern economist lacks a complete perspective. By examining the history of economic thought, the student will be able to categorize and classify thoughts and ideas and will begin to understand how to think like an economist. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain and analyze the development of economics as a discipline in various ancient cultures; Trace the development of European economic thought and analyze concepts in historical context; Compare and contrast Classical economic theories; Synthesize the elements of Neo-Classical and Keynesian approaches in the modern era; Evaluate the merits of alternative approaches to maximizing happiness. (Economics 301)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/18/2011
Housing and Land Use in Rapidly Urbanizing Regions, Fall 2011
Conditions of Use:
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A truly inter-disciplinary course, Housing and Land Use in Rapidly Urbanizing Regions reviews how law, economics, sociology, political science, and planning conceptualize urban land and property rights and uses cases to discuss what these different lenses illuminate and obscure. It also looks at how the social sciences might be informed by how design, cartography, and visual studies conceptualize space's physicality. This year's topics include land trusts for affordable housing, mixed-use in public space, and critical cartography.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Annette M.
Kim
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Human Rights in Brief
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In all civilized nations, attempts are made to define and buttress human rights. The core of the concept is the same everywhere: Human rights are the rights that one has simply because one is human. They are universal and equal. The following pubilcation gives an overview of Human Rights across the globe.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Faculty Reviewed Open Textbooks
Author:
United States Department of State Bureau of International Information Programs
Date Added:
10/28/2014
International Law
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this course, the student will learn fundamental principles of international law and examine the historical development of these laws. The first half will define international law, identify its foundations, and review its historical development. The student will examine one of the most central debates of international law: how these laws are enforced -- or, in many cases, not enforced. The inherent conflicts of international law with national sovereignty, domestic politics, and balance of power will also be reviewed. This course will explore specific topics within international law, such as the laws of war, the laws of the sea, international human rights, international crimes, environmental law, protection of intellectual property, and international trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how international law has developed over time; discuss the difficulties in enforcement of international law; identify issues that international law seeks to resolve; demonstrate an understanding of how power and politics influence the formation, application, and enforcement of international law; assess the effectiveness of international law in resolving transnational disputes. (Political Science 412)

Subject:
Law
General Law
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
International Organizations
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course provides a basic understanding of two core concepts in International Relations and, more generally, Political Science: international governance and international government. It will serve as the basis for further studies in the International Relations field within the Political Science major; it also serves as a companion course or ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_alter-egoĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ for the International Law course. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: define and correctly use the core vocabulary and concepts relevant for international organizations and global governance; discuss various theories of international governance as they pertain to regional and global contexts; identify and describe the major intergovernmental, non-governmental and transnational organizations that are participants in global relations; describe and discuss international regimes distinct from international organizations; compare and contrast various IGOs, NGOs and transnational organizations with respect to their structures, functions and activities; discuss the United NationsĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_ effectiveness with respect to addressing global issues such as armed conflict, human rights and environmental crises; evaluate the conceptual material in light of global realities through the exploration of case studies. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Political Science 312)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
International Political Economy
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the field of international political economy, teaching students the ways in which economics and politics influence each other when it comes to creating policy. Economic policy can be an important instrument of statecraft and diplomacy between countries, yet countries can also use economic policy to punish or express disapproval towards other countries using sanctions. In this course, the student will learn about the international organizations and regimes that are designed to facilitate international economic transactions and ensure economic stability, such as the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The student will also review the impact that globalization has on the world economy and the gap between rich and poor countries. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify, explain, and compare major theories in the field of international political economy; analyze the effects of trade policies on domestic and international actors; evaluate the costs and benefits of Foreign Direct Investment and Sovereign Debt; explain the development of the international currency system and analyze the effects of domestic policies; compare and contrast approaches to human rights and access to basic human needs. (Political Science 411)

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
International Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Societies, Fall 2011
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This graduate class is designed as a Ph.D.-level overview of international political economy (IPE), with an emphasis on the advanced industrial countries. It also serves as preparation for the IPE portion of the International Relations general exam. An important goal of the course is to use economic theories to identify the welfare effects, distributional consequences, and security implication of foreign economic policy decisions, and to use the tools of political science to analyze how interest groups, voters, political parties, electoral institutions, ideas, and power politics interact to share policy outcomes.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
David Andrew Singer
Date Added:
01/01/2011
International Relations, Spring 2007
Conditions of Use:
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This course is designed to acquaint beginning students with some of the fundamental principles of international relations such as realism and idealism. Realism, for example is based on the assumption that the state constitutes the most important actor in the international system. The course will also explore the nature of idealism, which emphasizes the role of international norms and ethics, such as the preservation of human rights, as a means of realizing international justice. The course will also analyze international political economy and various theories ranging from mercantilism to dependency theory.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ph.D.
Professor Robert Weiner
Date Added:
02/16/2011