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The Great Pyramid at Giza
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The object of this problem is to estimate the number of people ...

The object of this problem is to estimate the number of people required to build the Great Pyramid at Giza in Egypt. This pyramid is nearly 150 m tall* and 230 m wide at the base. The average block of stone used in building the pyramid has dimensions .66 m x 1.00 m x 1.50 m. These blocks were quarried at a site on the Giza Plateau that shall be taken to be about 5 km away although it may have been closer. The ancient Egyptians transported these blocks from the quarry to the pyramid on wooden sleds. They lubricated the ground in front of the sled's skids to make it easier to pull the blocks. In order to pull the blocks to the required heights, the Egyptians built earthen ramps that greatly reduced the slope of the pyramid side. In this fashion, Egyptian's working for the glorification of their gods and king, built the pyramid in 20 years. They were mostly farmers and needed to tend their crops most of the year so they could only work for 3 months a year when there was nothing to be done on their farms. It is beyond the scope of this problem to calculate the number of people required to quarry the stones, make and repair the ropes, apply the limestone seal, design and build the chambers, and perform the countless other acts of art and craftsmanship that were required to make the pyramid the marvel that it is. Instead, it is limited to calculating the number of workers needed to get the stones to the site and to lift them to the required heights. It will be left as an estimate to decide how many other people were required.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
University of Maryland
Provider Set:
Activity-Based Physics
LangSource
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LangSource is a searchable, annotated bibliographic database of language and culture resources. ...

LangSource is a searchable, annotated bibliographic database of language and culture resources. LangSource can be used by both teachers and learners at all levels in a variety of languages. Currently, the LangSource catalogue offers resources in Arabic, Chinese, German, Hausa, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Quechua, Spanish, Tamil, and Yoruba.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
University of Maryland
Provider Set:
National Foreign Language Center
Momentum Thinking Problems
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This reference is a series of assessment items that require that the ...

This reference is a series of assessment items that require that the students think through momentum conceptually, analyze graphs related to impulse and momentum, and work through calculations using momentum and impulse. There are energy and momentum problems mixed together in this set. Due to the large number of assessment items, the instructor will want to select a portion of the questions rather than use the entire set as a single assessment. The webpage is formatted in a straight forward text so it is easy to copy and paste the items for use in classroom tests and quizzes. 

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Assessment
Provider:
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
University of Maryland
Provider Set:
NGSS@NSTA
University of Maryland Physics Education Research Group
Author:
Joe Redish
Read Arabic!
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The Read Arabic! Internet lessons were developed at the National Foreign Language ...

The Read Arabic! Internet lessons were developed at the National Foreign Language Center (NFLC) at the University of Maryland primarily with high school students of Arabic in mind; however, the materials can also be used for those in college at the basic and intermediate level as well. The website assumes knowledge of the Arabic alphabet and how to read. In addition to lessons, the website includes a basic overview of the Arabic language in English, from its history to modern usage, and learning suggestions.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of Maryland
Relating Formulas to Common Sense: "Oomph"
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There are several tutorials on the page for this link. This review ...

There are several tutorials on the page for this link. This review is under the subheading "Momentum and Energy." It is a small group tutorial that leads students through the construction of an understanding of the concept of momentum and its conservation.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
University of Maryland
Provider Set:
NGSS@NSTA
University of Maryland Physics Education Research Group
Author:
Andy Elby
Samuel Gompers Papers Project
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This is a documentary editing project that collects, annotates, and makes available ...

This is a documentary editing project that collects, annotates, and makes available primary sources of American labor history. It includes microfilm, photocopied material, and annotation files for students and researchers.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
University of Maryland
Provider Set:
Samuel Gompers Papers
Superspace: One Thousand and One Lessons in Supersymmetry
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We introduce superfields in chapter 2 for the simpler world of three ...

We introduce superfields in chapter 2 for the simpler world of three spacetime dimensions, where superfields are very similar to ordinary fields. We skip the discussion of nonsuperspace topics (background fields, gravity, etc.) which are covered in following chapters, and concentrate on a pedagogical treatment of superspace. We return to four dimensions in chapter 3, where we describe how supersymmetry is represented on superfields, and discuss all general properties of free superfields (and their relation to ordinary fields). In chapter 4 we discuss simple (N = 1) superfields in classical global supersymmetry.

We include such topics as gauge-covariant derivatives, supersymmetric models, extended supersymmetry with unextended superfields, and superforms. In chapter 5 we
extend the discussion to local supersymmetry (supergravity), relying heavily on the compensator
approach. We discuss prepotentials and covariant derivatives, the construction of actions, and show how to go from superspace to component results. The quantum aspects of global theories is the topic of chapter 6, which includes a discussion of the background field formalism, supersymmetric regularization, anomalies, and many examples of supergraph calculations. In chapter 7 we make the corresponding analysis of quantum supergravity, including many of the novel features of the quantization procedure (various types of ghosts). Chapter 8 describes supersymmetry breaking, explicit and spontaneous, including the superHiggs mechanism and the use of nonlinear realizations.

We have not discussed component supersymmetry and supergravity, realistic superGUT models with or without supergravity, and some of the geometrical aspects of classical supergravity. For the first topic the reader may consult many of the excellent reviews and lecture notes. The second is one of the current areas of active research. It is our belief that superspace methods eventually will provide a framework for streamlining the phenomenology, once we have better control of our tools. The third topic is attracting increased attention, but there are still many issues to be settled; there again, superspace methods should prove useful.

We assume the reader has a knowledge of standard quantum field theory (sufficient to do Feynman graph calculations in QCD). We have tried to make this book as pedagogical and encyclopedic as possible, but have omitted some straightforward algebraic details which are left to the reader as (necessary!) exercises.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Maryland
Author:
Jr.
M. Rocek and W. Siegel
M.T. Grisaru
S.J. Gates